Vermelha Chair

Vermelha Chair
All Photos By Gail

For the brothers Fernando and Humberto Campana, startling materials are a hallmark of their design practice. Often evoking the rich street-market culture of their native Brazil, the utilize everyday elements in unexpected ways, such as this looped red cord for the opulent pile upholstery of this Vermelha (Red) chair (2007).

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Vermelha Chair

Phil Hale, Life Wants to Live at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Life Wants to Live 7 and 11
Life Wants to Live 7 and 11 (All Photos By Gail)

I wasn’t surprised to learn that painter Phil Hale used to do illustrations for Stephen King books, because his paintings delicately embrace the dreamlike, foreboding essence of a horror novel. Simultaneously compelling and repellent, Hale creates imagined visual tableaus “derived from images appropriated from the internet and analogue archives.” The exhibit’s accompanying press release reveals that” this new series of paintings and drawings are an artifact of the instability and uncertainty that characterizes our era.”

Life Wants to Live  14

The paintings that make up Life Wants to Live — each eponymously titled with an added number — are creepy, frightening and also very beautiful, and you can see that Hale has great talent as a realist painter who knows how to put a twist on the familiar without treading into the realm of the surreal.

Life Wants to Live 2 and 3
Life Wants to Live 2 and 3

Using both form and abstraction, the works convey the struggle to process, reconcile and structure an overwhelming flood of imagery and data. His realignments and mash-ups of the human form are truncated, extruded and redirected, suggesting not only the impossibility of constructing a meaningful whole from available fragments but also the unreliability of any interpretation at all.

Life Wants to Live 13
Life Wants to Live 13

Hale’s work also reminds of of painter Brett Amory, another artist represented by the Levine gallery. Phil Hale is an American living and working in London. I am glad to have discovered his work through the LeVine Gallery.

Phil Hale’s Life Wants to Live will be on Exhibit Through March 21st, 2015 at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street, 9th Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

P1080003

Landmark Ring Holder

Landmark Ring Holder
“Put a Ring On It”

If you are like me, you have a ton of jewelry, but not enough jewelry storage for the pieces that you like to wear every day. Here is a great solution: the Landmark Ring Holder and jewelry dish. These beautiful ceramic dishes designed to look like your favorite iconic structures are space saving enough to fit on your bedside table or dresser top, but big enough to hold your bling!

Available Designs include Eiffel Tower, Big Ben, and the Empire State Building. These ring holders are on sale now for just $16.95 (a 32% savings over the regular price of $24.95) and can be purchased right now by visiting This Link!

Sebastian Wahl’s Psychedelic Gravy for the Receptive Mind at Joseph Gross Gallery

Sebastian Wahl 3 Mandalas
From Left, Kaleidoscope Vision (1 and 2) and Third Eye Vision, Collage Layered in Resin, 2014 (All Photos By Gail)

Because it is up for only one more week, you should make every effort to head to the Joseph Gross Gallery for Sebastian Wohl’s amazing solo exhibition, Psychedelic Gravy For the Receptive Mind.

Wahl is a Swedish artist now living in NYC who works with collage and lacquer in a manner similar to that of artist Fred Tomaselli, but on a much more cerebrally expansive scale. Geoffrey and I were fortunate to meet and chat briefly with Sebastian at the exhibit’s opening reception, back on February 12th, and when I mentioned how much his work reminded me of Tomaselli, he did confess to also being a fan, and offered that Tomaselli’s use of lacquer had been a tremendous influence on this new body of work.

Vahalla
Vahalla

To achieve his multidimensional effect, Wahl carefully places handmade papers and images between layers and layers of resin. The result is a collage time capsule with real shadows cast within each piece. “Collage is my medium, resin is just the gravy on top,” the artist states in the exhibits press release, adding that, “The mystical experience has always been a point of reference for my work so Psychedelic Gravy For the Receptive Mind seemed like a fitting title for the exhibition.”

Mandalla 4
Mandalla 4

Wahl’s goal is to trigger an awakening of imagination, spirituality and vision. In his work everything is balanced with the attention of a tightrope walker. This attention to balance transforms into symmetry and repetition in the three new circular works that he created for this exhibition. These three pieces are titled Kaleidoscope Vision (1 and 2) and Third Eye Vision (see the first photo in this post) and are loosely inspired by traditional Thangka painting.

The Conductress
The Conductress

Flying Lotus, VooDoo Chile, Kaliucifer
Juju Elves From Left: Flying Lotus, VooDoo Chile, Kaliucifer

Sebastian also created a new series of 7 small pieces that he refers to as the Juju Elves. The works are charged with positive energy and the intention of protecting their owner’s home.

Jimi Hendrix 4 and Jimi Hendrix 2
Jimi Hendrix 4 and Jimi Hendrix 3

He also did series of portraits of Jimi Hendrix, each one unique from the others.

Detail of Jimi Hendrix 2
Detail of Jimi Hendrix 3

12/21/12
12/21/12

Sebastian Wahl’s Psychedelic Gravy for the Receptive Mind will be on exhibit only through February 28th, at the Joseph Gross Gallery, Located at 548 W. 28th Street, Suite 243, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Mandalla 1
Mandalla 1

Detail of Mandalla 1
Detail of Mandalla 1

Sebastian Wahl Signage

Frank Stella, Scramble: Ascending Spectrum/Ascending Yellow Values

Frank Stella
Photo By Gail

Yeah, I know it’s freezing ass cold in New York right now and nobody wants to go outside, but if you can force yourself to make it all the way to Tenth Avenue and 27th Street, you can see this gorgeous work of art by Frank Stella, entitled Scramble: Ascending Spectrum/Ascending Yellow Values, (1978) which is part of Paul Kasmin Gallery’s current group exhibit at this location, entitled, The New York School, 1969: Henry Geldzahler at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Kasmin exhibit features many of the original works from the 1971 Met exhibit, New York Painting and Sculpture: 1940 – 1970 including Josef Albers, Alexander Calder, John Chamberlain, Joseph Cornell, Mark di Suvero, Dan Flavin, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Hans Hoffmann, Donald Judd, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Morris Louis, Robert Motherwell, Isamu Noguchi, Kenneth Noland, Claes Oldenberg, Jules Olitski, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Frank Stella and Andy Warhol.

The exhibit will be on display through March 14th, 2015. Surely, it will have warmed up a bit before then.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Untitled (Night Train) By David Hammons

Night Train
Photos By Gail

This Sculpture / Installation, Untitled (Night Train) (1989) by African-American artist David Hammons had just been re-rotated into display from the permanent collection at MOMA when I visited earlier this month, and I think it’s really terrific.

David Hammons has risen to prominence while at the same time consciously ducking the attention of critics, galleries and museums, preferring to “do things in the street.” A recipient of both a MacArthur Foundation Genius Award and a Pric de Rome, Hammons places himself as an artist between Arte Povera and Marcel Duchamp. He makes his art from refuse and the detritus of African-American life: chicken wings, Thunderbird and Night Train bottles, clippings from dreadlocks, basketball hoops, etc. Hammons‘ deeply felt political views on race and cultural stereotypes give his witty and elegant sculptures, installations, and body prints an integrity that promises to keep the focus on his art rather than on his career.

David Hammons lives and works in NYC.

Night Train

Video Clip of The Week: Cotillon, “Before”



A former Bedroom recording project-turned-live band, Jordan Corso is the singer/songwriter behind LA-based Cotillon. Cotillon’s press release / bio explains that the project was “originally intended to illustrate the difficulty of maintaining relationships in LA in the spirit of the french new wave,” which I find fascinating.

Aurally, “Before” blends the wistful, lo-fi California sound of a group like Kid Wave with the minor chord gloom of The Cure circa 1982’s Pornography. The video, written and directed by Laura-Lynn Petrick, seems to switch between shots of a young lady aboard the Staten Island (or similar) Ferry, and old home movies of Southern California or Florida (some place where they have palm trees) shot on color stock that has now started to turn pale pink and blue, because that is what old color film does. It sets an appropriate mood to accompany the music, which will have special appeal for goths, and people on the verge of nodding out. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Cotillon’s self-titled debut album was released by Burger Records on January 26th, 2015. Enjoy!

Cotillon Cover Art