John Lennon Throws Metal on Cover of Yellow Submarine Album

Beatles YELLOW SUBMARINE
Image Source

Snagged this one from the Huffington Post

The Beatles are credited with being the first to do many things such as printing lyrics on a pop album, creating music videos and holding a stadium concert, but most bizarre is their role in the “devil horns” hand gesture taking off. John Lennon’s cartoon figure on the Yellow Submarine cover is apparently the first time the symbol was on the cover of an album and is one of the earliest instances associated with a rock band, ever.

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Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif
Photos By Gail

The above pictured sculpture, Suspended Objects (2011) was created by artist Hassan Sharif from countless long strands made up of multi-colored yarns, twine, string and wire, tied together and also wrapped around bits of plastic, foam and other found objects. It’s super colorful and reminds me of a big Jellyfish.

Suspended Objects is part of the Here and Elsewhere group show now on exhibit at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, previously discussed in this post, so click that link for more information!

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif
Suspended Objects (Detail)

Bitchen Camaro

Bitchen Camaro
Photo By Gail

Check out this Sweet Ride of The Day! I took this photo of an awesome silver Camaro last July in the city of Ketchikan, Alaska, while in port during a Carnival Cruise. You can even see our ship, The Miracle, in the background of the shot. Good times!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Jasper Johns, Flag

Jaser Johns Flag
Flag By Jasper Johns, 1954, Encaustic, Oil, and Collage on Fabric mounted on Plywood, Three Panels (Photo By Gail)

From Moma Dot Org:

“One night I dreamed that I painted a large American flag,” Johns has said of this work, “and the next morning I got up and I went out and bought the materials to begin it.” Those materials included three canvases that he mounted on plywood, strips of newspaper, and encaustic paint—a mixture of pigment and molten wax that has formed a surface of lumps and smears.

The newspaper scraps visible beneath the stripes and forty-eight stars lend this icon historical specificity. The American flag is something “the mind already knows,” Johns has said, but its execution complicates the representation and invites close inspection. A critic of the time encapsulated this painting’s ambivalence, asking, “Is this a flag or a painting?”

Jasper Johns was born May 15th, 1930 and currently lives in Sharon, Connecticut. Flag is part of the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Video Clip of The Week: Night Club, “Need You Tonight”



This Week The Worley Gig is on Vacation in lovely Bermuda and doesn’t want to have to think too much. That is why we are bringing you the first-ever Video Clip of The Week encore appearance from a band Previously Featured here on the site, that band being the electronic duo Night Club. You’re welcome.

With Night Club, featuring Keyboardist Mark Brooks and gorgeous singer Emily Kavanaugh you know you are going to get a knock out performance with dynamite visuals and the duo’s spot-on cover on the INXS hit, “Need You Tonight” delivers on all levels.

Watch for more new music from Night Club coming in September! Enjoy!
NightClub
Image Source

Hall of Mammals Dioramas, Museum of Natural History

Impala
The Tame Impala (All Photos By Gail)

I remember when I first saw the trailer for Night at the Museum, and I was so excited for the movie because it had long been a fantasy of mine to be in NYC’s Museum of Natural History after closing time to see if all of those animals in the nature dioramas might come to life. Just being serious.

I like to visit the Natural History Museum on Central Park West a few times a year to see the special, temporary exhibits, but I also try to spend time when I am there at my favorite installations which are the Hall of Ocean Life and the Guggenheim Hall of Gems and Minerals, where I could lose myself for hours.

Grizzly Bear
Grizzly Bears

On a recent trip however, Geoffrey and I decided to spend a couple of hours really exploring the Mammal Halls – including animals from North America, Africa and Asia displayed in painstakingly recreated lifelike dioramas of their natural habitats – which is generally a section of the museum we end up racing through on our way to somewhere else. Although these dioramas undergo regular maintenance and periodic restorations, they are essentially unchanged in 50 years and the stories they tell are eternal.

I really love the mammal halls because they are kept mostly in darkness, where the only lights come from inside the dioramas. This makes them somewhat challenging to photograph but gives the exhibits a timeless sense of romance and adventure.

Baboons
Baboons

You can read a bit of the background on how these dioramas were created at This Link. But for now, let’s see more pictures.

Alaskan Brown Bear
Alaskan Brown Bears

Wapiti Elk
Wapiti (Elk)

American Bison
American Bison

Alaska Moose
Alaskan Moose

Musk Ox
Musk Ox

Mountain Goat Family
Mountain Goat Family

Ice Age Mammals
Miniature Diorama of North American Ice Age Mammals

Big Horn White Sheep
Big Horn White Sheep

Cheetahs
Cheetahs

Water Buffalo
Water Buffalos

GiraffesZebras

The Giraffes and Zebras above are actually two halves of the same large Diorama.

These photos represent just a tiny fraction of the all the animals and exhibits we saw. It was such a fun day! you should go and have your own adventure!

The American Museum of Natural History is located on Central Park West Between 79th and 83rd Streets on NYC’s Upper West Side. Take the C train to the 83rd Street Stop.