Tag Archive | Colorful

Ziggy Stardust By Albert Oehlen

Ziggy Stardust
Photo By Gail

Albert Oehlen (b. 1954) exaggerates and distorts the conventions of abstract painting, breaking rules as a way to critique traditions based on taste and canonized art historical narratives. His paintings are steeped in an aesthetic of extravagance and indulgence, often containing jarring color combinations, half-baked forms, and decorative touches.

Oehlen’s Ziggy Stardust (2001) pays homage in its title to musician David Bowie, who used his lavish alter-ego, Ziggy Stardust, to examine the power — and the destructive nature — of Rock and Roll. By channeling Bowie, Oehlen draws attention to the excesses of painting.

Beginning with an austere architectural CAD drawing, Oehlen the launches an assault on the canvas with bilious color, sludgy forms, and clashing techniques. Combining computer-generated and gestural marks, Oehlen prods at the very idea of the artist’s hand and supposed creative genius.

Photographed in The Broad Museum in Downtown Los Angeles.

Bridget Riley at David Zwirner Gallery

Bridget Riley Black and White Square
All Photos By Gail

Do you enjoy the fabulous Op Art images of legendary British painter Bridget Riley? I sure do. Bridget Riley is so cool, the retro-pop project Death By Chocolate even wrote a song about her. Fabulous. Bridget is 84 now, but still rocking a paintbrush, and I got to meet her recently at the opening reception for her current exhibit over at David Zwirner. You need to check it out.

Bridget Riley Installation View

This new show is the gallery’s first exhibition with Bridget Riley in New York, her first show in the city since 2007, and the only New York presentation since Bridget Riley: Reconnaissance at the Dia Center for the Arts in 2000 to feature new and older works. The exhibition marks fifty years since Riley’s participation in The Responsive Eye at The Museum of Modern Art, the highly influential group show which led to instant, international recognition for the young British painter. Last year, David Zwirner hosted her inaugural show at the London gallery, which was a major survey of her stripe paintings from 1961 to 2014.

Bridget Riley

One of the most significant living artists, Riley’s work has radically explored the active role of perception in art, using the interrelationship between line and color to convey movement and light within the pictorial field. From the early 1960s, the artist has employed elementary shapes — such as circles, stripes, and curves — to create visual experiences that actively engage the viewer, testing the limits of each element at various stages throughout her career.

Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley Vertical Stripes

Stripes

This exhibition includes paintings and works on paper spanning almost thirty-five years of Riley’s practice. It takes its chronological point of departure in vertical stripe works from the early 1980s featuring her “Egyptian palette” inspired by the artist’s trip to Egypt in late 1979, which unlike previous combinations of color was organized according to plastic (and not rational) principles. These asymmetrical compositions anticipated the ensuing diagonal grid paintings that Riley began in 1986. Featuring rhomboid shapes that break up the picture plane, these in turn became the foundation for her curved paintings in the late 1990s.

Bridget Riley Installation View 2

Vertical, curvilinear shapes prevailed in the past decade and also characterize her wall painting Rajasthan (2012), a composition of intersecting forms in green, gray, orange, and red whose presentation here marks its first display outside of Europe.

Bridget Riley Orange and Green

Bridget Riley Orange Purple and Green

Bridget Riley Yellow Blue and Green

Bridget Riley Black and White Long

The exhibition culminates with Riley’s most recent stripe works as well as a new series of black-and-white paintings that explore concavity and convexity of the line, all shown here for the first time. The return to painting in black and white, which she had abandoned in the mid-1960s in order to explore the properties of color, was directly inspired by Riley’s 1962 painting Tremor, and here appears in the current context of five decades of work.

Signature

Bridget Riley will be on Exhibit Through December 19th, 2015 at David Zwirner Gallery, Located at 525 and 533 West 19th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Bridget Riley Signage

Bridget Riley Framed

Keith Sonnier, Portals at Maccarone Gallery

Circle Portal A
Circle Portal A By Keith Sonnier (All Photos By Gail)

Maccarone Gallery is currently hosting Portals, 14 new wall-mounted neon sculptures by artist Keith Sonnier. Sonnier’s by-now iconic work is emblematic of a generation of artists who sought to liberate the artistic encounter from the formal constraints of Modernism to produce a sensory and emotional experience that also extended beyond the Spartan affect of Minimalism. The category of post-Minimalism, however, does not adequately describe both the unique wit and visceral impact that Sonnier’s work displays.

Gothic Portal
Gothic Portal

In his latest series, Sonnier  take the orphic allegory of the portal and explores its many different historical manifestations. Whether the portal serves as an entrance or an exit, the plane itself is a threshold — a doorway that contains both birth and termination. Taking this metaphor to its logical end, the works in Portals can be thought of as doorways to various different periods in human design — whether it be the neoclassical extension of a line into space or Romanesque arcading, each work is a luminous referent to specific architectural pathways.

Palermo Portal
Palermo Portal

The artist also displays a perversely delightful humor with the libidinous allegory of the portal as human orifice. Neon phallic protrusions punctuate the joints of these architectural gates, playing at the double-entendre embedded in the show’s title. Sonnier challenges the two-dimensionality of neon sculpture through twisting spatial arcs and juts that demand that the viewer change his or her own perspective to deduce what components of the work are exiting or entering. This tension between penetration and accommodation gives each work a wry corporeal undertone that is simultaneously abstracted by architectural allusions. Sonnier evokes art, the body, and architectural history in this polysemous suite of neon works.

Palermo Portal Detail
Palermo Portal Detail

Here are a few of out favorite pieces from this fun show!

Wall Portal B
Wall Portal B

Installation View

Gallery View from the Opening Reception!

Wall Extension B
Foreground: Wall Extension B. Background: Helmut Portal

Gros Bec
Gros Bec

Above and below are, I think studies for Sonneir’s sculptures.

Dough Boy A and Wink
Dough Boy A and Wink

Portal Nave
Portal Nave

Circle Portal B
Circle Portal B

Portals by Keith Sonnier will be on Exhibit Through December 19th, 2015 at Maccarone Gallery, Located at 630 Greenwich Street, NYC 10014.

Syracusa Portal
Syracusa Portal

Keith Sonnier Portals Poster

Frank Stella, Shape As Form at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Flin Flon 1970, Sinjerli III 1967
L: Flin Flon 1970, R: Sinjerli III, 1967 (All Photos By Gail)

You have just one more week to catch Frank Stella: Shape as Form, a solo exhibition of career-spanning works by the artist, on view at Paul Kasmin Gallery‘s Tenth Avenue space.The exhibition articulates Stella’s groundbreaking fusion between painting and sculpture.

The title of the exhibition is taken from Michael Fried’s essay published in ARTFORUM in November of 1966, which recognized the historic step Stella took with his Irregular Polygon paintings and “the very closeness of their relation to advanced sculpture.”

Beginning with the Protractor series of the 1960s through the Bali series of the early 2000s, Stella’s course between two and three dimensions has had a profound impact on generations of artists.

Sinjerli III 1967

The exhibition begins chronologically with Sinjerli III, 1967, a Protractor painting employing the compositional element Fans, which was one of three devices developed at this time (along with Interlaces and Rainbows). Though strictly two-dimensional in structure, Sinjerli can be visually interpreted as being either recessive or protruding, optically challenging the limitations of the flat surface.

Flin Flon 1970

The same is true in Flin Flon, 1970, from the series of the same name, in which Stella uses a layered series of “interlaces” to create architectural reference points and illusionistic depth.  These works are evident of Stella’s systematic approach to creating variations of paintings according to pre-determined criteria, which grew in complexity with every passing series.

Eskimo Curlew
Eskimo Curlew

Stella’s evolution into the third dimension — from the visual realm to the physical — would progress rapidly through the 1970s and 1980s in the form of the series Exotic Birds, represented in the exhibition by Eskimo Curlew, 1977, and the Circuits, seen here in Mosport 4.75X, 1982.

Mosport
Mosport

La Scienza della Fiacca
La Scienza della Fiacca

From 19841987, Stella’s hybridization of painting and sculpture would reach a dramatic crescendo in the Cones and Pillars series. Included in this exhibition is La Scienza della Fiacca 3.5X, 1984, a masterwork that was illustrated in the monograph from the artist’s 1987 mid-career retrospective at The Museum of Modern Art, NY and last exhibited at the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart in 1989.

Stella Wall Sculpture

In the Cones and Pillars, the fundamental physical constructs of what traditionally constituted a painting had been expanded, effectively broadening the definition of the medium.

Frank Stella, Shape As Form will be on Exhibit Through October 10th, 2015 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located on the Southwest Corner of 27th Street and Tenth Avenue in the Chelse Gallery District.

Canvas

Frank Stella Signage

Metal Wall Sculpture

3D Print Mosaic Bust of Benjamin Franklin

Ben Franklin
Photo By Gail

I think this is my favorite photo I took at the 3D Print Show: a fantastically detailed bust of Ben Franklin. Look at the startling realism around his eyes — amazing! I also love how this was done with a variety of different colored filaments to create a mosaic cubist motif that’s just mind-blowing.

Charles Clary at Nancy Margolis Gallery

Charles Clary Art
“Wow, Look at the Colors!” (All Photos By Gail)

The Charles Clary exhibit at Nancy Margolis has been up since December, but the opening reception wasn’t until January 9th. So I don’t feel too out of it that I had my first chance to stop by this past week on the way to Cheim and Read, and could not resist snapping few photos of his colorful and delicately structured artworks for the blog.

Charles Clary Art at Nancy Margolis Gallery
Close up of Form Seen in the Above Photo, Far Left

This is the first exhibition for Clary ( a Tennessee native) with Nancy Margolis Gallery.  These intriguing constructions are created from towers of layered, brightly colored paper. The sculptures, precise and labor-intensive, reveal a phenomenal color sensibility and an original expression distinctly his own.

Charles Clary Art at Nancy Margolis Gallery

Exact cuts and layered stacks of thin paper make up his geometric volumes of variegated textures and sinewy shapes. Forms are reminiscent of microbial colonies, sound waves, fractals and topographical landscapes. The collected sculptures in the photo directly above remind me of chunks of driftwood on the beach.

Charles Clary Art at Nancy Margolis Gallery

A palette of rainbow like colors playfully invite viewers to venture into the vivid creative world of Clary’s sculptures, ever-expanding, pulsing, and surreal.

Charles Clary Art at Nancy Margolis Gallery

I really enjoyed photographing these sculptures, which are even more vibrantly colorful in person. Check them out before the exhibit closes in just under 2 weeks.

Sculptures By  Charles Clary will be on Exhibit through February 1st, 2014 at Nancy Margolis Gallery, Located at 523 W 25th St. New York NY 10001. Gallery Hours are Tuesday – Saturday 10: 00 AM – 6:00 PM.

Charles Clary Art at Nancy Margolis Gallery