Tag Archive | Dark Shadows

Top Ten Things I Learned from Hurricane Sandy

Sandy Mercedes Mail Box
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Your Neighbors are looking out for you, even if you think they don’t know who you are.

Keep Your Mobile Devices Charged to Maximum Power at all times.

Eat Everything in your freezer and all of your perishable food before the storm hits.

When the power goes out, unplug your Refrigerator.

Buy D-cell Batteries at least a few days in advance.

There is no such thing as having too many Candles on hand.

The DVR is not recording your scheduled shows if there is no power.

In the battle of Black Clothing Versus Cat Hair, Cat Hair will win every time

The pleasure derived from being able to take a Hot Shower cannot be overestimated.

Friends you’ve know for over 10 years but whom you’ve never hung out with for more than a few hours at a time will let you sleep on their couch and feed you for a week.

Tim Burton Recreates The Look of Original Alice Cooper Band for Dark Shadows Film Cameo

Alice Cooper Dark Shadows
Alice Cooper with Dennis Dunaway Clone to his Left

It’s not exactly a secret that singer Alice Cooper has a small part in the new Tim Burton film version of the 1970s Gothic TV Soap Opera Dark Shadows. What I didn’t know until I saw the film yesterday is that it’s not just Cooper but the entire original band called Alice Cooper that’s recreated for several scenes taking place during a ball at the Collin’s family mansion, Collinwood. For these scenes, Alice fronts a group of actors who mime to the band’s hit “No More Mr. Nice Guy” as well as the fan favorite “Ballad of Dwight Fry” from 1971’s Love It To Death. I must say that Burton did a terrific job of casting actors who look remarkably like original band members Glen Buxton, Mike Bruce and Dennis Dunaway (see photo above). And while the actor playing drummer Neal Smith is mostly hidden behind Alice during the performances, at least he appears to have Smith’s trademark long blond hair.

Worleygig.com has learned from a source inside the Alice Cooper camp that the concept of giving the audience an authentic, 70s-era Alice Cooper Band experience is owed not just to Tim Burton but also primarily to Johnny Depp (who must be a fan) and Burton’s team executed it beautifully, and as well as they could given the infinitesimally brief amount of screen time given to anyone other than Alice. It is certainly a deserved homage to one of the most innovative and enduring American bands of the seventies. What makes this story even more interesting though is the fact that Cooper’s former band mates (who were all inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2011) apparently had no idea they were being represented in the film. Apart from being aware that Alice had a cameo in Dark Shadows, drummer Neal Smith told me on the phone that Alice hadn’t offered him any details on the part and that he was hearing about the entire original band being represented in the film for the first time from me. One might think that with the Hall of Fame induction last year, Cooper would consider that having their likenesses portrayed in a major motion picture would be newsworthy to his former band mates. But then again, why would he. Overall, I really loved the film, even though I was expecting to be disappointed, and thought the Alice Cooper band bits were lots of fun, “No More Mr. Nice Guy” being my favorite song from the original band and all. it Have you seen Dark Shadows? If so, what did you think?

Must See Movie: The Social Network

Jesse Eisenberg Stars in The Social Network

One thing to keep in mind when going to see the fantastic new film, The Social Network is that this is not a movie about Facebook. The billion-dollar creation of Mark Zuckerberg could have been anything – an advice column or a shopping website – it really wouldn’t have mattered. The only thing that mattered in sealing the fate of this now 26-year-old computer nerd as the youngest billionaire in history was Zuckerberg’s ability to fine-tune an already existing idea (a phenomenon that is also known as ‘building a better mousetrap’). Not only do you not need to be user of FaceBook to enjoy The Social Network – a film that will surely be feted with many Academy Award nominations – you don’t even need to know what FaceBook is. The Social Network – which at its core tells a gripping tale of rampant personal ambition and the relationships sacrificed due to inadequate foresight – is an entertaining and highly engaging film that never loses sight of where it is going. Director David Fincher (Fight Club) and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin have created a taught drama with psychological undertones and many belly laugh-inducing moments evoked by some of the smartest, wittiest dialogue I’ve heard in a movie in ages. I can’t say enough positive things about this film.

Whoever cast The Social Network should get an Academy Award of his or her own for making such spot-on choices. On screen, Jesse Eisenberg, whom I’ve always considered to be the “straight man version of Michael Cera,” becomes Mark Zuckerberg – a brilliant but almost borderline-autistic social misfit seemingly obsessed with one-upping anyone he perceives as his intellectual competition. Eisenberg carries the movie on his performance alone, but there are so many other fantastic performances to revel in. Pop singer Justin Timberlake is excellent in the role of Napster founder Sean Parker, who plays devil’s advocate to a naïve Zuckerberg.  I’ve always found Timberlake’s music to be mainstream and mediocre at best, but he is obviously a naturally gifted actor. Maybe he should go the way of Mark Wahlberg, leave pop music behind and concentrate on acting? Just saying.

This was also my first exposure to actor Armie Hammer (the devastatingly handsome, great grandson of late tycoon/philanthropist, Armand Hammer), who plays a dual role of Zuckerberg’s chief nemesis, identical twins Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss; two financially privileged students who row for Harvard’s crew team, and who unknowingly set the wheels in motion when they hire Zuckerberg to write code for their start-up dating website. Hammer does a fascinating job of playing identical twins, and if you didn’t already know that a single actor played both roles you certainly would not guess. My very favorite use of an actor whom you rarely see anymore is David Selby’s appearance as the lawyer to Zuckerberg’s original partner in the creation of FaceBook. Fans of the 1970s-era Gothic soap opera, Dark Shadows may recognize Selby from his role as Quentin Collins in that legendary TV series. Selby, now in his late 60s and white-haired, still looks absolutely fantastic. What a treat to see him in this film!

Much has also been said about the film’s score, composed by Trent Reznor and his longtime cohort, Atticus Ross. It’s been ten years since Reznor produced anything that caught my attention or held my interest. But his and Ross’s contribution to The Social Network includes intense, propulsive and storyline-appropriate techno-flavored musical themes that serve the film beautifully. More than once, the score carried a scene without need for any additional dialogue by the characters – quite a noteworthy accomplishment! I’ve avoided giving too many details about the actual plot of The Social Network because, as is the case with so many films of high quality, I feel that less is definitely more as far as how much you need to know going in versus how much enjoyment you will get if you just let the film unfold for you.

The Worley Gig Gives The Social Network – now in nationwide release – Five out of Five Stars.