Tag Archive | Exhibit

Brooklyn Museum Presents Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe

Killer Heels Catalog Display
All Photos By Gail

If you are what some people refer to as a “Shoe Freak,” or even a fan of Art, Design and Fashion, you will want to hoof it over to the Brooklyn Museum to see Killer Heels, a fantastic exhibit of High Heeled Shoes that opened just yesterday. Geoffrey and I were lucky enough to attend the opening reception and party this past Saturday and we had all kinds of crazy fun.

Party Table Decor
Let’s Party

Let’s relive the good times now, by enjoying some of my photos from the party and the exhibit.

Tattoo Station

To get people in the mood for shoes, Party-goers were able to get a temporary tattoos with one of two designs based on the shoes pictured below (which, obviously are part of the exhibit):

Flaming Shoes

I got this one of a pair of Wedge Heels decorated with Flames! Fast!

Red Fetish Boots

Or you could choose a design based on these “Kinky Boots” fetish style Red Thigh High Boots!

W Mag With Rihanna on the Cover

They were also giving out the latest issue of W Magazine with Rihanna on the cover. She does nothing for me but people seem to like her for whatever mysterious reason.

Piper-Heidsieck Brut Champagne

Piper-Heidsieck was a sponsor for the party and their delicious Champagne flowed freely.

Bar

In addition to an open bar and passed hot Hors d’oeuvre, there were also some sweet treats.

Vanilla Cake Ball

Such as these Vanilla Cake Balls and also Milk Chocolate Miniature Gold Pumps.

Milk Chocolate Gold Pump

Mmm…Little Chocolate Shoes.

Ferrragamo Platform Cake

Speaking of Sweet Treats, check out this rad cake made in the likeness of Salvatore Ferragamo’s very famous multi-colored suede platform sandal created for Judy Garland back in 1938! As far as I know, nobody even got to eat this cake, and that’s just a shame.

Killer Heels Signage

OK, let’s leave the party behind and go look at some Killer Heels. Here we go!

Ornate Gold Shoes

Killer Heels explores fashion’s most provocative accessory. From the high platform chopines of sixteenth-century Italy to the glamorous stilettos on today’s runways and red carpets, the exhibition looks at the high-heeled shoe’s rich and varied history and its enduring place in our popular imagination.

Candlestick Heel Boots
Candlestick Heel Boots

Gold Winged Slipper

Red Shoes

As fashion statement, fetish object, instrument of power, and outlet of artistic expression for both the designer and the wearer, throughout the ages the high-heeled shoe has gone through many shifts in style and symbolism.

Betty Grable Display View

Deadly sharp stilettos, architecturally inspired wedges and platforms, and a number of artfully crafted shoes that defy categorization are featured among the more than 160 historical and contemporary heels on loan from designers, from the renowned Brooklyn Museum costume collection housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and from the Bata Shoe Museum.

Spike Ankle Boot
Close Up of Black Spiked Stiletto Boot from Above Display

Designers and design houses represented in Killer Heels include Manolo Blahnik, Chanel, Salvatore Ferragamo, Zaha Hadid X United Nude, Iris van Herpen X United Nude, Christian Louboutin, Alexander McQueen, André Perugia, Prada, Elsa Schiaparelli, Noritaka Tatehana, Vivienne Westwood and Pietro Yantorny.

Ferragamo Judy Garland Platform
Here’s That Ferragamo Platform Sandal Again. It is so Legendary.

Platform Boot With Spur
Platform Boot With Spur

Presented alongside the objects in the exhibition are six specially commissioned short films inspired by high heels. The filmmakers are Ghada Amer and Reza Farkhondeh, Zach Gold, Steven Klein, Nick Knight, Marilyn Minter, and Rashaad Newsome.

Silver Guggenheim Shoes

“Everyone loves to wear shoes inspired by the Guggenheim Museum!” I heard someone say about this pair of silver space age shoes. Coincidentally, there was a lady at the event wearing these exact shoes!

Two Green Shoes

Shoe Hat
Shoe Hat

Horse Hoof Boots
Horse Hoof Boots

Red Wedgewood Pumps
Red Wedgewood Pumps

Foot Shoes
Almost Like Going Barefoot?

Chanel Light Bulb Heels
Chanel Light Bulb Heels

Space Age Boots

If Ace Frehley had been a woman, surely he would have worn these boots as part of his Space Ace costume in Kiss.

Amber Toed Pump

There is just so much great art tied into the design of all of these shoes, it was easy to feel a bit overwhelmed by the flood of genius and beauty.

What a great show! I recommend you go see it as soon as possible!

Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe will be on Exhibit Through February 15, 2015 in the Robert E. Blum Gallery (1st Floor) at the Brooklyn Museum, Located at 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York 11238-6052. Take the 2 or 3 Trains Right to the Eastern Parkway Stop.

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Match Box Art By Mohamed Larbi Rahhali

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art
All Photos By Gail

These tiny collages, drawings and mixed-media works all represented on Match Boxes are part of the series called Omri (My Life) by Moroccan artist Mohamed Larbi Rahhali.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

Omri is included in Here and Elsewhere, the comprehensive group exhibit currently inhabiting The New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

Here and Elsewhere is a major exhibition of contemporary art from and about the Arab world, and brings together more than forty-five artists from over fifteen countries.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

These photos capture just a fraction of the hundreds of Match Boxes in Mohamed Larbi Rahhali‘s piece, and the work is still ongoing.

Watch for more posts featuring art from Here and Elsewhere on The Gig in the upcoming week.

Here and Elsewhere is on Exhibit Through September 28th, 2014, at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, located at 235 Bowery (at Prince street) in Soho, NYC.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

New Paintings by Mark Kostabi at Martin Lawrence Galleries

Kostabi Signage
All Art By Mark Kostabi. All Photos By Gail

Do you enjoy looking at the paintings of contemporary pop artist Mark Kostabi? I sure do. There are a few reasons why I never miss an opening reception for an exhibit of Mark’s work: not only is there a ton of great art to look at and talk about with other cool, art-loving people, but it is always a good party and a chance to, as it is sometimes referred to in the vernacular, “make the scene.” And I enjoy making the scene.

Kostabi Sculpture
I got a good shot of this sculpture, because no one else was in the gallery yet.

Just this past Thursday, I had a chance to make the scene at Mark’s current exhibit, which is going on at the Martin Lawrence Galleries on West Broadway — a very nice venue. Before I get to talking about the paintings, I want to point out how this artist reception differed from 99% of all other art openings. Please see visual documentation below.

Cheese Donuts

Look at all that cheese!

Cheese Donuts 2

Celebrity Photographer Derek Storm was overheard to say that these wheels of fine, spreadable soft cheeses reminded him of Donuts. Mmm…cheese donuts.

Cheese and Fruit Plate

So much free cheese was available — and also, wine! — it was pretty much the greatest art opening, ever. It looks like the cheese extravaganza was sponsored by a place called Castello Cheesemonger. Their cheese made me happy.

Now, on to the Art! A good number of Mark’s new paintings belong to series I made up in my head called “Barbie’s Happy Fun Day on Acid.” Get an idea of what I am talking about below.

Dancing Girl

Dancing Barbie on Acid.

Sleeping Person

Barbie Dreams of Being On Acid.

Full Length Mirror

Barbie’s Self-Reflection (On Acid).

Do you see what I mean? I love all these paintings. You can interpret them to mean what ever you want, really. Art!

Red and Black

The last time I saw this very beautiful painting, it was sitting on the floor of Mark’s studio, Kostabi World. Now, it is in a gallery and you can buy it!

Consumerism

I interpret the above painting to be a statement on consumerism and how it weighs you down like little men are hanging on to your legs.

I deliberately left the rack of chimes in that photo to remind me to mention that Mark is not only an amazing artist but also a gifted composer and wildly talented pianist. At the opening, Mark performed a few of his original compositions with his trio that includes Bassist Paul Nowniski and Drummer Keith LeBlanc. It was awesome.

Twister Sister

The painting above is called Twister Sister and it is of a lady (Acid Barbie, perhaps) playing a game of Twister on a Damien Hirst Spot Painting. I desire to own it.

Piano with Couple

This one is cool, because it goes from being in Black and White to being in Color — just like the Wizard of Oz!

Warhol Kostabi Basquiat

This is a photo from the ’80s of Mark with Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat, in which the coolness factor is off the charts.

NYC Window

I love this one a lot, too.

Angel with Cat

And this one, of an Angel with her Cat. What is making that pink glow that you see leading down from the ladder? I want to find out.

Thoughtful Angel

This is definitely a must-see exhibit, so don’t miss it!

Martin Lawrence Galleries is located at 457 West Broadway (Between Houston and Prince) in Soho, NYC.

Kostabi Painting with Signature

Kara Walker’s Sugar Sphinx at the Domino Sugar Factory

Kara Walker Sugar Sphinx
All Photos by Gail

The most popular art exhibit in the city right now is Kara Walker’s massive Sugar Sphinx: the crouching figure of an African America woman, completely covered in white, refined sugar, which was constructed over an eight week period in the cavernous interior of the now defunct Domino Sugar Factory building that faces the waterfront in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Subtlety Artist Statement

Sponsored by Creative Time, Subtlety, as the piece is officially named, is the first large-scale public project by the internationally renowned Walker. Sited in the sprawling industrial relics of Brooklyn’s legendary Domino Sugar Factory, Walker’s physically and conceptually expansive work responds to both the building and its history, exploring a radical range of subject matter and marking a major departure from her practice to date. The exhibition promises to be an eye-opening experience for both those who are familiar with Walker’s work and those who are new to it.

Creative Time Sign

I visited the Sphinx with a friend on a Sunday afternoon, arriving 10 minutes before they started letting people in at Noon, and waited only about 20 additional minutes before we were inside. Be forewarned that this is a very popular attraction. Within ten minutes of joining the line at South 2nd Street and Kent Avenue, the line already stretched another block behind us and continued to grow. So, be sure to pee and eat before you get there, wear comfortable shoes and sun block, and be prepared to wait for as long as it takes, because you are on an Urban Adventure!

Sphinx Distance Shot

The Sphinx only takes up about one-third of the space, so you get to enjoy the emptiness of the gutted factory and imagine what it must have been like when it was full of machinery and people and sugary substances – the residue of which still covers the buildings interior surfaces. I love walking around inside abandoned buildings, so this was a huge treat for me for that reason alone.

Abandoned Factory Interior Shot

Sugar Baby with Basket

Sugar Baby's Basket

In addition to the Sphinx, there are perhaps a dozen five-foot high molasses-based sculptures of young boy laborers, many carrying wide baskets which hold sugar in its various states.

Sugar Crystal Chunks in Basket

Sugar Crystal Chunks

The boy sculptures range in hue from deep brown and nearly black to crystalline amber. Thin puddles of dark molasses expands across the floor from the bases of these figures as they have started to slowly melt.

Sugar Baby Close Up

Sugar Baby with Molasses Trail

The Huffington Post has an excellent article on the Sugar Sphinx, including an interview with Kara Walker, which reveals a lot of the theoretical groundwork for the project and will give you some perspective that may be useful to consider when viewing the exhibit, because it’s a pretty heavy deal.

Sugar Sphinx Side View

Knuckles Detail
Detail of Her KnucklesSugar Sphinx Rear View
Rear View

I had a great time seeing the Sugar Sphinx and her Molasses Babies. Once you are inside, you can stroll around and take photos for as long as you like, and the temperature stays pretty cool and comfortable even on a warm day (it was near 70 on the day I went). There are also tons of restaurants in the area, so it’s super easy to find a place to have a nice lunch or dinner once you are done with your visit.

Subtlety, Or The Marvelous Sugar Baby (aka The Sugar Sphinx), By Kara Walker will be on Exhibit at the Abandoned Domino Sugar Factory, located at South 1st Street and Kent Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, until July 6th, 2014. Hours are 4 – 8 PM on Fridays and Noon – 6 PM Saturdays and Sundays. Expect a wait of 30 Minutes Up to Over an Hour (Totally Worth it). The Exhibit is Free and Open to the Public. Take the L Train to Bedford Avenue and Walk South West for about 15 Minutes. The J or M Trains to the Marcy Avenue Exit will also get you there.

Holton Rower, Too Many Ideas at The Hole

The Hole Gallery View
A Room Full of Ideas (All Photos By Gail, Click on Any Image to Enlarge for Detail)

If you’re intrigued by the idea of visiting an artist’s studio, where you could not only see finished works but also get a peek inside his head to discover what concepts he’s experimenting with, then I suggest you visit The Hole to check out Holton Rower’s new exhibit, Too Many Ideas.

Pour Painting Chairs

Fans of this blog may recall reading about Rower’s art when we previously reviewed his exhibit of Pour Paintings and Focus Paintings, examples of which are scattered throughout the gallery for the Too Many Ideas show. The process through which Rower creates the Pour Paintings – which are really quite gorgeous – is also adapted for use with various kinds of sculptures including functional furniture.

Pour Painting on the Floor

A Pour Painting hides behind a set of chairs, created by the same paint-layering methods.

Crumpled Pour Painting on the Floor

Here, a folded Pour Painting collapses on the ground under a work bench.

Pour Painting Bust

It looks like he had fun creating these colorful and primitive looking Busts.

Pour Painting Bust 2

Instrument Mutes

Rower also experiments with groups and collections of similar objects. Above, a collection of Instrument Mutes gather without comment on a work surface.

Miniature Tea Set

This miniature China Tea Set sits atop a found-object sculpture, which can be seen center gallery in the top photo.

Scissors Cluster

He could be creating a series of hanging, grouped objects with this precarious Scissors Sculpture, which is joined in the show by a cluster of hanging whistles and also bike lock chains.

Whistles Cluster

Origami Money Shawl

There are at least four works that involve folded paper money (can we call it origami?) including this lovely Shawl.

Origami Money Shawl
Detail from Origami Money Shawl

Not everything works, but I enjoyed the “group show” feel and the excitement of continuous discovery as I walked around the gallery taking in all of the different pieces. It will be fun to see which ideas he chooses to develop for future shows and which are abandoned.

Too Many Ideas By Holton Rower will be on Exhibit through May 4th, 2014 at The Hole, Located at 312 Bowery (at 2nd Street), NYC. Visit The Hole NYC for Gallery Hours and More Information.

Desire Obtain Cherish: We Are Known By The Company We Keep at Unix Gallery

P1020431
All Photos By Gail

If the new standard of originality in the arts is based on how cleverly you appropriate and reinvent images and ideas from other well known sources, then LA based pop art sculptor known as Desire Obtain Cherish (real name Jonathan Paul) is a genius. We Are Known By The Company We Keep is his new solo show at Unix Gallery, and it is a mind blower.

Blow Up Doll
Some kind of Blow Up Sex Doll Thing

Desire Obtain Cherish (DOC) works across a wide variety of different media to create art that both validates and critiques the cycle of consumerism alluded to in his pseudonym. His controversial and self aware work combines pop, street, conceptual and appropriation art to explore contemporary society’s unrelenting obsession with sex, drugs, luxury, media and fame.

Here are some of our favorite works from the show.

Stuffed Honey Bear Beehive

Giant stuffed Bear Shaped Like a Beehive fills the center of the Gallery’s front room.

Hirst Spot Painting Wrapped Candy

Wrapped Candy Sculpture inspred by Damien Hirst’s Spot Paintings.

Warhol Mondrian Pollack Homage

This series of conjoined canvases pays homage to Warhol, Mondrian and Pollack.

Intensive Care Units Cabinet

Intensive Care Units is an ornate display cabinet filled with rows of silver and gilt-accented “blood bags,” each of which is embossed with the name and logo of a famous designer brand.

Blood Bag Close Up

Designer Blood Bags Close Up

Metallic Lollipop Sculpture

DOC has done Blow Pop sculptures like these for other exhibits, but this one appears to be a direct reference to the factory-made works of Jeff Koons.

Obviously, there are many, many layers of thought and meaning behind each work, which made it even more hilarious that one woman followed me around the exhibit repeating the phrase “I Don’t Get It” over and over.

We Are Known By The Company We Keep by Desire Obtain Cherish will be on view through May 6th, 2014 at UNIX Gallery, Located at 532 W 24th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Hauser & Wirth Presents Selections from the Reinhard Onnasch Collection

Claes Oldenberg
Claes Oldenberg Model for a Mahogany Plug, Scale B. 1969 (All Photos By Gail)

Hauser & Wirth’s cavernous space at 511 West 18th Street is currently hosting a selection of works from the collection of Reinhard Onnasch. A celebration of Onnasch’s longstanding passion for art and collecting, Re-View: Onnasch Collection is curated by Paul Schimmel, celebrated post-war scholar and Partner of Hauser Wirth & Schimmel.

Christo Wrapped Road Sign 1963
Christo Wrapped Road Sign 1963

The exhibition focuses on the period between 1950 and 1970, decades when New York’s cultural influence was unrivaled and some of the most important artistic movements of the 20th century were born. On view will be iconic examples of Pop Art, Fluxus, Color Field, Assemblage, Minimalism and Abstract Expressionism.

Claes Oldenberg Soft Medicine Cabinet
Claes Oldenberg Soft Medicine Cabinet, 1966

The collection will be on exhibit through April 12th, 2014.