Tag Archive | Furniture

Vermelha Chair

Vermelha Chair
All Photos By Gail

For the brothers Fernando and Humberto Campana, startling materials are a hallmark of their design practice. Often evoking the rich street-market culture of their native Brazil, the utilize everyday elements in unexpected ways, such as this looped red cord for the opulent pile upholstery of this Vermelha (Red) chair (2007).

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Vermelha Chair

Artichoke Lamp

Artichoke Lamp
Photo By Gail

The PH Artichoke Hanging Lamp (1958) was designed by Danish designer Paul Henningsen,  and manufactured by Louis Poulsen & Co. It is made from bent copper, steel and enameled metal and looks just  spectacular!

Henningsen’s Artichoke Lamp employs copper leaves attached to a metal framework to suggest the actual plant. The resulting composition creates industrial-looking, uniform layered planes while evoking a naturally occurring structure.

I  recently passed by the office building at 11 West 19th Street, where I once worked well over a decade ago, and saw that they now have these lamps installed in the lobby.

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Skyscraper By Paul T. Frankl

Skyscraper By Paul T Frankl
Photo By Gail

By the 1920s, the skyscraper was a symbol of American modernity. Here, Frankl uses maple and Bakelite to suggest the jagged, upward-reaching outline of a New York skyscraper. By breaking with the constraints of the past, this towering architectural form expressed the excitement and optimism of a new era.

Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Not My Cup of Tea Musical China Cabinet

Not My Cup of Tea
All Photos By Gail

Not My Cup of Tea follows Splendour Lender, a cabinet which addresses the Dutch tradition of displaying one’s porcelain in a “Pronkkast” as a symbol of status and happiness.

A coin, inserted into either cabinet, rolls down the porcelain, producing an enjoyable melody. In contrast to Splendour Lender, which holds a collection of porcelain, this cabinet contains identical cups and plates. While the cabinet alone encapsulates abundance, the meaning behind the phrase “Not My Cup of Tea” suggests discrimination. After each usage, the coin is returned, which would usually happen when a product is defective. The repetitious cups and their tunes show the universal cycle of consumption, the financial greed of modern times, regardless of difference in taste.

Created by Designer Jelle Mastenbroek, Eindhoven, Netherlands. Available at Chamber, Located at 515 W. 23rd Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District. Hours are Tuesday – Saturday 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM. Visit Chamber online at Chamber NYC Dot Com.

Not My Cup of Tea

Hand Table

Hand Table
All Photos By Gail

Little is known about Costo Archillopoulo, the designer of this table (circa 1934), which is both a functional piece of furniture and a fantastical Surrealist sculpture. The glass tabletop rests improbably atop small balls balanced on the tips of three delicately tapering fingers, generating a sensation of tension and unease.

Hand Table 2

Disembodied hands and gloves are recurrent motifs in Surrealist art, with the left hand, in particular, symbolizing the irrational. The cloudlike element from which the hand emerges also suggests a transition from the conscious to the subconscious world.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC.

Velvet Chair and Dancing Videos

Velvet Chair and Dancing Videos
All Photos By Gail

The antique velvet chair seen above is part of the exhibit Maira Kalman Selects, on now at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum. Embedded in the seat back of the chair is a small tablet screen which shows videos of dancing ballerinas. Thus the work’s title, Velvet Chair and Dancing Videos. Clever.

Dancing Videos Detail

For this exhibition, the author, artist and designer has filled the former first-floor Drawing Room of what was once the Carnegie Mansion, with 40 objects from sources including the Cooper Hewitt, the National Museum of American History, and her personal collection to suggest the journey of a life story, from birth through death.

Kalman is best known for her whimsical take on modern life. Here, she explores the human condition, presenting objects that create a picture of daily life as she sees and lives it. In her words, the exhibition is about “falling in love with a group of objects”; “the preciousness of time”; and the realization that “many of the most important memories in your life will be populated by the most seemingly unimportant objects. A chair. A bowl.”

And what does she suggest you do when you enter the exhibition? Just look. And listen. “To wander about in a room in a museum and to have the fluttery feeling of discovery and potential,” she says, “is a great feeling.”

Velvet Chair and Dancing Videos Signage

Maira Kalman Selects will be on View Through June 14th, 2015 at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, Located on Fifth Avenue at the Corner of 92nd Street.

Stacking Chair By Danny Lane

Stacking Chair
All Photos By Gail

Danny Lane is a London-based designer, visual artist and glass sculptor who specializes in working with fractured and stacked glass.  His popular Stacked Chair (1993) is made up of slab-like green-tinted glass with polished, irregular edges. The chair back and rear, single leg are  constructed of an arched column of stacked irregularly cut and polished glass slabs held together by a central steel rod topped by a nut. Similar construction applies to the chair’s shorter front legs and feet

Stacking Chair Display Shot

This is what the chair looks like on display in the contemporary art wing of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, where I took these photos last summer. You can actually find this chair for sale around the web, with a little Googling effort.

Stacking Chair Detail