Tag Archive | Furniture

Cinderella Table and Attracted to Light Lamp

Cinderella Table and Attracted to Light Lamp
All Photos By Gail

If you have timed tickets to the Bjork Songlines exhibit and need to kill a couple of hours at MOMA while you wait, be sure to visit the third floor Architecture and Design Galleries, many of which have just recently been restaged!

That’s where you’ll find Geoffrey Mann’s Attracted to Light hanging lamp (2005). According to the designer “Attracted to Light narrates the erratic behavior of a moth upon the stimulus of light.” The insect’s path through the air is captured using cinematic technology and materialized through rapid prototyping (also called 3D printing), a process by which computer-controlled lasers solidify liquid or powdered resin layer by layer to create a three-dimensional rendering of a digital design – in this case forming a delicate hanging lamp.

Attracted to Light Lamp
Attracted to Light (Detail)

The design is part oh Mann’s Long Exposure series, which also features lamps based on the trajectories of a bird in flight, taking off, and landing.

Just under the lamp you’ll find the Cinderella Table (2004) by Dutch designer Jeroen Verhoeven for his firm Demakersvan (“The Makers of”). With this table, Demakersvan merged traditional and advanced manufacturing techniques. Using computer software, they translated sketches of the profiles of two tables into digital drawings and then made a rendering representing the two morphing into each other.

Next, using computer-driven woodcutting machines normally employed for mass production, they fabricated the drawing as a three-dimensional object, in thin vertical sections out of sheets of birch. Each slice was glued by hand to the next, forming a unique piece of furniture.
Cinderella Table
Cinderella Table Detail

Mid-Century Bar with Circular Mirrors

Mid-Century Bar with Circular Mirrors
Photo By Gail

We spotted this fantastic Mid-Century Design Service Bar at an event at the Marriott Marquis Hotel and had to take a snap! The design would look great as part of any retro or modern decor, but in this case, we think that the carpet’s print reflects onto the mirrors to make the orbs look like a constellation of planets! Very Cool!

Moss Lamp

Moss Lamp
All Photos By Gail

This Moss Lamp (1999) exemplifies designer Gaetano Pesce’s use of industrial production techniques and materials to produce unique objects. Here, he pours silicone in thread-like trails to achieve a textured and translucent sphere that casts a soft glow through irregular gaps and varied thicknesses. The end result is dictated by the behavior of the material.

Moss Lamp Display

Vermelha Chair

Vermelha Chair
All Photos By Gail

For the brothers Fernando and Humberto Campana, startling materials are a hallmark of their design practice. Often evoking the rich street-market culture of their native Brazil, the utilize everyday elements in unexpected ways, such as this looped red cord for the opulent pile upholstery of this Vermelha (Red) chair (2007).

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Vermelha Chair

Artichoke Lamp

Artichoke Lamp
Photo By Gail

The PH Artichoke Hanging Lamp (1958) was designed by Danish designer Paul Henningsen,  and manufactured by Louis Poulsen & Co. It is made from bent copper, steel and enameled metal and looks just  spectacular!

Henningsen’s Artichoke Lamp employs copper leaves attached to a metal framework to suggest the actual plant. The resulting composition creates industrial-looking, uniform layered planes while evoking a naturally occurring structure.

I  recently passed by the office building at 11 West 19th Street, where I once worked well over a decade ago, and saw that they now have these lamps installed in the lobby.

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Skyscraper By Paul T. Frankl

Skyscraper By Paul T Frankl
Photo By Gail

By the 1920s, the skyscraper was a symbol of American modernity. Here, Frankl uses maple and Bakelite to suggest the jagged, upward-reaching outline of a New York skyscraper. By breaking with the constraints of the past, this towering architectural form expressed the excitement and optimism of a new era.

Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Not My Cup of Tea Musical China Cabinet

Not My Cup of Tea
All Photos By Gail

Not My Cup of Tea follows Splendour Lender, a cabinet which addresses the Dutch tradition of displaying one’s porcelain in a “Pronkkast” as a symbol of status and happiness.

A coin, inserted into either cabinet, rolls down the porcelain, producing an enjoyable melody. In contrast to Splendour Lender, which holds a collection of porcelain, this cabinet contains identical cups and plates. While the cabinet alone encapsulates abundance, the meaning behind the phrase “Not My Cup of Tea” suggests discrimination. After each usage, the coin is returned, which would usually happen when a product is defective. The repetitious cups and their tunes show the universal cycle of consumption, the financial greed of modern times, regardless of difference in taste.

Created by Designer Jelle Mastenbroek, Eindhoven, Netherlands. Available at Chamber, Located at 515 W. 23rd Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District. Hours are Tuesday – Saturday 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM. Visit Chamber online at Chamber NYC Dot Com.

Not My Cup of Tea