Tag Archive | Furniture

Modern Art Monday Presents: David Hockney, Large Interior, Los Angeles

David David Hockney Large Interior LA
Photo By Gail

David Hockney’s Large Interior, Los Angeles (1988) applies a cubist treatment of geometry to open up the interior of a large, modern, urban living space. In this painting, the conventional tunnel perspective of a regular image is expanded to give a fisheye panorama of the entire space.

The viewer’s attention is initially drawn to the central living area, but then begins to wander and explore; the fireplace, the kitchen, dining area, even an external deck and outdoor garden invites us toward it. The floor, furnishings, walls and all the contours of the ceiling faces are folded open but without loosing any dimension or becoming flat. Light pours through the skylights and exterior opening illuminating the main living area with bright vibrant colors.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Vivian Beer’s Anchored Candy Chair

Anchored Candy Chair 1
All Photos By Gail

Vivian Beer’s Anchored Candy Chair may remind you of a stiletto-heeled shoe, or perhaps the sleek styling of a sports car.

By fusing such gendered images, Beer highlights both the obvious differences and the more subtle overlap between masculine and feminine consumer forms.

Tuffet Seat

The red Tuffet seat is the first in a new series inspired by the pieces of industrial scrap metal left over from laser cutting. Beer replicated the cut out look of these fragments on a computer, adapting a pattern from a screen by the Art Deco metalsmith Edgar Brandt (1880 – 1960).

Anchored Candy Chair

Like many women in the historical section of the Pathmakers exhibit, Beer studied at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan, which continues to be a center for creative innovation across all disciplines.

Anchored Candy Chair

Since receiving her MFA in 2004, Beer has become well known for her use of industrial materials such as steel and concrete to create sensuously curved seating.

Anchored Candy Chair Detail

Vivian Beers Anchored Candy Chair is part of the Exhibit Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft and Design, Midcentury and Today, at the Museum of Arts and Design, Located at 2 Columbus Circle, NYC, Through September 30th, 2015.

Paul T. Frankl, Skyscraper Step-Table

Skyscraper Step Table

Skyscraper Step Table, 1927 (Photo By Gail)

The magazine Good Furniture commented in 1927 that Paul T. Frankl (1886 – 1958), “has developed one feature that is absolutely unique. This is the now somewhat celebrated skyscraper type of furniture, which is as American and as New Yorkish as Fifth Avenue itself.” Indeed, what could be more American and modern than furniture based on the uniquely American contribution to architecture – The skyscraper. Frankl was creating furniture of this type by 1925, thereby making him one of the first modern designers of American decorative arts.

Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum.

Sansa Chair in Red By Cheick Diallo

Sansa Chair
All Photos By Gail

The Sansa Chair, an inventive deconstruction of the chair form, is among the original creations that have established Cheick Diallo (b 1960 in Mali, West Africa), as one of Africa’s leading contemporary designers.

Sansa Chair Front
Sansa Chair Front View (2012)

Built from steel and nylon material by artisans from Bamakos at Diallo’s direction, the half-reclining Sansa chair seems to sit midway between a European notion of the chair as a leisure object and a West African idea of the chair as a support for displaying a person of status.

Sansa Chair Rear
Sansa Chair Rear View

I think it is simply stunning!

Part of the Brooklyn Museum’s Arts of Africa Collection, this chair is on view in the Double Take: African Innovations Installation, East Gallery, 1st Floor (Through July 2016).

Damien Hirst Spin Chair

Damien Hirst Spin Chair
All Photos by Gail

The problem with an item of furniture that is also an expensive piece of collectible art is that you tend to not want to use it for its originally intended function, which would be, of course, to sit on it. Because we’ve all been told countless items to refrain from touching the art, let alone putting our asses on it.

This unique Spin Chair by artist Damien Hirst, specifically entitled Beautiful Arrested Development,  can be found at Other Criteria, Hirst’s gift shop on Broome Street in NYC’s Soho district, selling for $13,400. Bring your Black Card.

Damien Hirst Spin Chair

Marshmallow Sofa

Marshmallow Sofa
Photo By Gail

Designed George Nelson™ and Irving Harper in 1956, the playful Marshmallow sofa is a landmark of Midcentury modern design that’s still turning heads and making people smile. The 18, round cushions can be all the same color or in multiple colors for the right look in a private office, lobby, lounge, living room or den.

Manufactured by Herman Miller, this design is currently on sale for $3,314.00 (with Free Shipping!) at This Link.

The Marshmallow Sofa in this post was photographed on display as part of Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Battery Park City, Manhattan, NY.

Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism at The Museum of Jewish Heritage

Kaufman House
Julius Shulman Photo of Richard Nuetra’s Kaufman House in Palm Springs, CA (All Photos by Gail. Click on Any Image to Enlarge for Details)

Anyone smitten with Midcentury Design (as encapsulated and popularized by the Mad Men aesthetic) should plan a visit to the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, for their fantastic exhibit Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism. I was fortunate to attend a private preview of the exhibit the evening before it opened to the public, and was not only visually thrilled by this comprehensive showcase of vintage furnishings, housewares, graphics, and architecture, but I really learned a lot about the people behind these designs.

Midcentury Furniture
Midcentury Furniture Featuring George Nelson’s Marshmallow Sofa by Herman Miller

Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism explores how Jewish emigrants and American-born designers and architects helped spark America’s embrace of midcentury modernism — forging a bold new direction in design and thought. The exhibit focuses on the roles of more than 30 Jewish architects, designers, and patrons, including Anni Albers, George Nelson, and Richard Neutra; as well as others whose fascinating life stories and important contributions have received less acclaim.

Here are some favorite highlights from the exhibit!

Furniture By Paul Frankl
Sofa and Shelves By Paul Frankl

Furnture by Alvin Lustig
Furniture by Alvin Lustig

Furniture by Harry Rosenthal
Furniture by Harry Rosenthal, William Schiff House by Richard Neutra, (San Francisco, CA)

X-110 House
Exterior of X-110 House (Right), Interior of X-110 House (Center and Left). Prototype developed by Joseph Eichler. Designed by A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons (Photos By Ernest Braun)

Kaufman House
Richard Neutra’s Kaufman House (1946), Palm Springs CA, (Above and Below Photos by Julius Shulman, 1949)

Kaufman House Pool
Kaufman House Pool

Banner in Exhibition Hall
Banner in Exhibition Hall Featuring Modern Kitchen Appliances of the Day

The Modtini

The opening reception featured an open bar where they served this delicious classic vodka cocktail, the Modtini!

George Tscherny
Lark Cigarette Packages By George Tscherny, 1968

Booky Covers By Alvin Lustig
Book Covers By Alvin Lustig (1943, 1945)

Household Items by Henry Dreyfuss
Above and Below, Household Items by Henry Dreyfuss
Household Items by Henry Dreyfuss
Thermostat, Pink Princess Phone, Alarm Clock

Ernest Sohn Designed Products
Ernest Sohn, Esquire Coffee Pot with Lid, Creamer, Sugar Bowl with Lid, Small Casserole Dish with Lid (1963). (Center) Esquire Large Casserole Dish with Lid (1963). (Lower) Doric Coffee Urn with Lid and Stand, Creamer, Sugar Bowl with Lid, and Tray (1959)

Album Covers By Alex Steinweiss
Album Covers By Alex Steinweiss

In 1939, Alex Steinweiss (a graduate of NYC’s Parsons school of Design) designed what is recognized as the first example of album cover art and soon became the art director at Columbia Records. During the 1940s, he was asked to develop a packaging solution to protect a new product: the long playing 133 1/3 rpm vinyl record. Steinweiss designed a paper jacket that quickly became the industry standard. He oversaw cover art for Columbia up until the 1070s, designing thousands of album covers.

Album Cover By Alex Steinweiss

Steinweiss’s covers combine witty cartoon figures, abstract shapes, bright colors and his signature, curly hand-drawn lettering.

Corporate Logos
Corporate Logos by Saul Bass, Louis Danziger, Paul Rand

Movie Ad for the man with the Golden Arm
Movie Ad for the Man with the Golden Arm By Saul Bass

There is so much to see and learn at the Designing Home exhibit and I really cannot recommend it highly enough. Aside from this one show, the museum hosts many other permanent exhibits and is situated right on the water in Battery Park City, which means spectacular views!

Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism is Currently on Exhibit at The Museum of Jewish Heritage, A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, Located at Edmond J. Safra Plaza, 36 Battery Place, Battery Park City, New York, NY 10280 (By Subway: Take the 4 or 5 Train to Bowling Green and walk west along Battery Place). Admission is Free on Wednesday Evenings, and you can visit them online at MJHNYC Dot Org for Admission, Hours and Other Exhibit Information. I’m not quite sure when the Designing Home Exhibit ends, so maybe give them a call at 646-437-4202 before you plan your visit!

Designing Home Signage