Tag Archive | Furniture

Extruded Aluminum Bench

Bench Front View
Billet 1: Extrusion 1 Bench, 2009 (All Photos By Gail)

Can you squeeze a chair out of a machine, the way you squeeze toothpaste out of  a tube? Extruded aluminum, commonly used for double-glazed window frame systems, is made by squeezing heated metal through a shaped hole, or die. Intrigued by the warped lengths that occur during this process, the studio sought to make seating, formed in single extrusions, that makes imperfection part of the design.

Bench Right Side View
Bench Viewed from its Right Side

The Heatherwick team worked with an Asian factory whose extrusion machine, used to make aerospace-industry components, can exert 11,000 tons of pressure. The result is a series of seats in which straight, clean lengths contrast beautifully with raw, disfigured ends.

Bench Left Side View
Bench Viewed from its Left Side

This electroless-nickel-plated, aluminum bench was designed by Thomas Heatherwick in collaboration with contemporary art gallery Haunch of Venison.

Bench Rear View
Extrusion Bench, Rear View

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York City.

Modern Art Monday Presents: David Hockney, Large Interior, Los Angeles

David David Hockney Large Interior LA
Photo By Gail

David Hockney’s Large Interior, Los Angeles (1988) applies a cubist treatment of geometry to open up the interior of a large, modern, urban living space. In this painting, the conventional tunnel perspective of a regular image is expanded to give a fisheye panorama of the entire space.

The viewer’s attention is initially drawn to the central living area, but then begins to wander and explore; the fireplace, the kitchen, dining area, even an external deck and outdoor garden invites us toward it. The floor, furnishings, walls and all the contours of the ceiling faces are folded open but without loosing any dimension or becoming flat. Light pours through the skylights and exterior opening illuminating the main living area with bright vibrant colors.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Vivian Beer’s Anchored Candy Chair

Anchored Candy Chair 1
All Photos By Gail

Vivian Beer’s Anchored Candy Chair may remind you of a stiletto-heeled shoe, or perhaps the sleek styling of a sports car.

By fusing such gendered images, Beer highlights both the obvious differences and the more subtle overlap between masculine and feminine consumer forms.

Tuffet Seat

The red Tuffet seat is the first in a new series inspired by the pieces of industrial scrap metal left over from laser cutting. Beer replicated the cut out look of these fragments on a computer, adapting a pattern from a screen by the Art Deco metalsmith Edgar Brandt (1880 – 1960).

Anchored Candy Chair

Like many women in the historical section of the Pathmakers exhibit, Beer studied at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan, which continues to be a center for creative innovation across all disciplines.

Anchored Candy Chair

Since receiving her MFA in 2004, Beer has become well known for her use of industrial materials such as steel and concrete to create sensuously curved seating.

Anchored Candy Chair Detail

Vivian Beers Anchored Candy Chair is part of the Exhibit Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft and Design, Midcentury and Today, at the Museum of Arts and Design, Located at 2 Columbus Circle, NYC, Through September 30th, 2015.

Paul T. Frankl, Skyscraper Step-Table

Skyscraper Step Table

Skyscraper Step Table, 1927 (Photo By Gail)

The magazine Good Furniture commented in 1927 that Paul T. Frankl (1886 – 1958), “has developed one feature that is absolutely unique. This is the now somewhat celebrated skyscraper type of furniture, which is as American and as New Yorkish as Fifth Avenue itself.” Indeed, what could be more American and modern than furniture based on the uniquely American contribution to architecture – The skyscraper. Frankl was creating furniture of this type by 1925, thereby making him one of the first modern designers of American decorative arts.

Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum.

Sansa Chair in Red By Cheick Diallo

Sansa Chair
All Photos By Gail

The Sansa Chair, an inventive deconstruction of the chair form, is among the original creations that have established Cheick Diallo (b 1960 in Mali, West Africa), as one of Africa’s leading contemporary designers.

Sansa Chair Front
Sansa Chair Front View (2012)

Built from steel and nylon material by artisans from Bamakos at Diallo’s direction, the half-reclining Sansa chair seems to sit midway between a European notion of the chair as a leisure object and a West African idea of the chair as a support for displaying a person of status.

Sansa Chair Rear
Sansa Chair Rear View

I think it is simply stunning!

Part of the Brooklyn Museum’s Arts of Africa Collection, this chair is on view in the Double Take: African Innovations Installation, East Gallery, 1st Floor (Through July 2016).

Damien Hirst Spin Chair

Damien Hirst Spin Chair
All Photos by Gail

The problem with an item of furniture that is also an expensive piece of collectible art is that you tend to not want to use it for its originally intended function, which would be, of course, to sit on it. Because we’ve all been told countless items to refrain from touching the art, let alone putting our asses on it.

This unique Spin Chair by artist Damien Hirst, specifically entitled Beautiful Arrested Development,  can be found at Other Criteria, Hirst’s gift shop on Broome Street in NYC’s Soho district, selling for $13,400. Bring your Black Card.

Damien Hirst Spin Chair

Marshmallow Sofa

Marshmallow Sofa
Photo By Gail

Designed George Nelson™ and Irving Harper in 1956, the playful Marshmallow sofa is a landmark of Midcentury modern design that’s still turning heads and making people smile. The 18, round cushions can be all the same color or in multiple colors for the right look in a private office, lobby, lounge, living room or den.

Manufactured by Herman Miller, this design is currently on sale for $3,314.00 (with Free Shipping!) at This Link.

The Marshmallow Sofa in this post was photographed on display as part of Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Battery Park City, Manhattan, NY.