Tag Archive | Sculpture

Video: Flying Cherubs Kinetic Art Sculpture by Walter Rossi

This mesmerizing kinetic art sculpture by Italian Artist Walter Rossi can be observed from the first floor front window of the Agora Gallery, located at 530 West 25th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Since 2000, Rossi has been working in kinetic art. He animates action toys and other found items by using a magnetic motor. The results are like theatrical presentations; often very funny and profound at the same time. I could watch them fly around all day long!

Zheng Lu’s Water Dripping – Splashing at Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Sculpture by Zheng Lu
Water Dripping – Splashing By Zheng Lu (All Photos By Gail. Click on Any Image to Enlarge)

The gravity-defying sculpture works of Zheng Lu are deeply influenced by his study of traditional Chinese calligraphy, an art form he practiced growing up in a literary family. Zheng Lu uses language as a pictorial element, inscribing the surface of his stainless-steel sculptures with thousands of Chinese characters derived from texts and poems of historical significance.

Sculpture by Zheng Lu Detail

To create his metal sculptures, Zheng Lu begins with a plaster base. He then laser-cuts character into metal, and in a fashion similar to linking chainmail, the pictographs are connected and heated so that they can be shaped to the support. The resulting works are technically astonishing: their fluid, animated forms are charged with the energy (qi) of the universe, belying their steel composite.

Sculpture by Zheng Lu Detail 1

Zheng Lu was born in Chi Feng, Inner Mongolia, China in 1978. He lives and works in Beijing.

Sculpture by Zheng Lu Detail 2

Zheng Lu’s Water Dripping – Splashing is part of the Bright Eye of the Universe Exhibit and will be up Through October 10th, 2015 at Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Located at 547 West 27th Street, Ground Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Zheng Lu Signage

Boy Kong Mural and Sculpture Welcomes Attendees to the Affordable Art Fair!

Boy Kong Mural
Fiend Cub, Spray Painted Mural by Boy Kong

If you attended the Affordable Art Fair in NYC this past weekend, you could not have missed the bright, florescent colored Tiger Mural, entitled Fiend Cub, adorning the 18th street-exposed wall of the entrance lobby at the Metropolitan Pavilion, which was created by Orlando, Florida based artist Boy Kong especially for the fair!

Fiend Cub Boy Kong Mural

I think that just looking at the piece got everyone excited for the show before they even entered the exhibition hall!

Boy Kong Blood Dancer

Kong also created a companion piece in this sculpture, Blood Dancer. A 3D artist by trade, Boy Kong expertly illustrates, paints and then hand cuts, and layers pieces of wood or acrylic to create his signature aesthetic. His pieces usually incorporate a bright and upbeat color scheme while his subjects often portray a disquieting message.

Modern Art Monday Presents: East West Gate by Yu Yu Yang

East West Gate 1
All Photos By Gail

Near the Water Street side of the plaza at 88 Pine Street is a two-piece abstract sculpture called East West Gate, by Taiwanese artist Yu Yu Yang  (1926 – 1997), consisting of a large shiny stainless steel disk standing upright next to a 16-foot-tall steel rectangle with a circular hole in it, suggesting that the disk has been cut from the rectangle.

East West Gate 2

This circle in the square creates an intriguing visual and philosophical perspective for the viewer who repeatedly regresses in the reflection of the disk.

East West Gate 3

Yang’s works show a rich variety of forms and subjects with their essences based on Chinese cultures through expressions that incorporate both eastern and western aesthetics. A renowned sculptor, environmental designer and architect, Yang was a versatile and prolific artist who left behind a great legacy of art.

East West Gate 4

East West Gate 5

Rejected Skin By William Tarr

Rejected Skin
All Photos By Gail

For years I’ve walked by this sculpture installation at the corner of Water Street and Old Slip, and assumed it was one of John Chamberlain’s crushed car works. But recently I was compelled to snap a few photographs and the do a bit of Googling. What I found out is that back in 1970, artist William Tarr made this sculpture from aluminum panels meant for the facade of 77 Water Street (the building on whose plaza it sits) that were rejected due to their imperfections. Thus, the sculpture’s name, Rejected Skin.

Rejected Skin

Rejected Skin 2

Video: Tim Hawkinson’s Gimbled Klein Basket at Pace Gallery

Artist Tim Hawkinson explores the fourth dimension with his 2007 Gimbled Klein Basket, which creates an analog rendering of an impossible object. With a porous, gridded bamboo structure, Hawkins then recreated the Klein Bottle and suspended it from the ceiling like a Calder mobile, envisioning an object which is at once knowable, and of another dimension. This video was created at the Pace Gallery on W. 25th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, as part of the Eureka exhibit, which has now closed.

Girl On a Chair By George Segal

Girl on a Chair
All Photos By Gail

George Segal (1924 – 2000) was an innovator in sculpture known for his installations of white plaster figures with ghostly appearances. He depicted the dignity in everyday life, showing people poised at a bus stop, paused before a Traffic Intersection, or conversing on a park bench. Segal’s work also took on political themes such as the Holocaust and gay pride. At the time the Girl On a Chair (1970) sculpture was created, the artist discussed its art historical references:

“The chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house, the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof…I’ve always liked the hardness and softness combined, this wedding of organic and geometric.”

Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum.

Girl on a Chair