Tag Archive | Sculpture

Disco Ball Caught in a Bear Trap

Disco Ball Caught in a Bear Trap
Photos By Gail

Check out this fun sculpture by Joel Morrison! Disco Ball Caught in a Bear Trap (2013) is constructed of Stainless steel and measures 28 x 30 x 36 inches (71.1 x 76.2 x 91.4 cm). Edition of 3. Photographed by me at the Leila Heller Gallery on West 57th Street.

Disco Ball Caught in a Bear Trap

Modern Art Monday Presents: Jean Arp, Constellation with Five White and Two Black Forms: Variation 2

Constellation with Five White and Two Black Forms
Photo By Gail

Jean Arp, also known as Hans Arp (September 16, 1886 – June 7, 1966) was a German-French sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper. When Arp spoke in German he referred to himself as Hans, and when he spoke in French he referred to himself as Jean. Interesting!

Arp was a founding member of the Dada movement in Zürich in 1916. In 1920, as Hans Arp, along with Max Ernst, and the social activist Alfred Grünwald, he set up the Cologne Dada group. However, in 1925 his work also appeared in the first exhibition of the surrealist group at the Galérie Pierre in Paris. Through his investigation of biomorphism (as seen in Constellation with Five White and Two Black Forms: Variation 2, 1932, above) and of chance and accident, he proved especially influential on later 20th-century art in liberating unconscious creative forces.

Constellation with Five White and Two Black Forms: Variation 2 by Jean (Hans) Arp is part of the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. View it in Painting and Sculpture I, Gallery 12, 5th Floor.

Must See Art: Frank Stella Sculpture at the Marianne Boesky Gallery

Puffed Star II, 2014
Puffed Star II, 2014, Polished Aluminum (All Photo By Gail)

Can you believe that Frank Stella is 78 years old and he is still making amazing sculptures like Puffed Star II? I can’t even believe it — and yet, it is true. Right now, Marianne Boesky Gallery presents Frank Stella Sculpture, the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery since joining in the spring of 2014, and you really have to check it out. Because, Look at this:

K.150, 2014
K.150, 2014

Just Look at it!

K.150, 2014

K.150, 2014

If this were the only piece in the show, it would still be worth going to. K.150, as it is called, was rendered using rapid prototyping or 3D printing. So remarkable.

K.150, 2014

K.150, 2014

If I owned this sculpture, I would never, ever stop looking at it. But wait, there’s more!

Sanibel to Sobolnoye, 2014
Sanibel to Sobolnoye, 2014

This one is pretty cool as well.

Sanibel to Sobolnoye, 2014

Fishkill, 1995
Fishkill, 1995

This one, Fishkill, is from Stella’s Hudson River School series.

Frank Stella Sculpture Sturdy

I think this one is a study for larger work, as you can see a tiny model of the Puffed Star inside of it. Go see this exhibit while you can.

Frank Stella Sculpture will be on Exhibit Through December 20th, 2014 at Marianne Boesky Gallery, Located at 509 West 24th Street, New York, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Frank Stella Sculpture Signage

K8 Hardy, Credit Default Swap

Credit Default Swap
Credit Default Swap (2012), Duratrans Film on Lightbox, Edition of 2 (Photo By Gail)

K8 Hardy’s work typically subverts common conceptions of fashion and consumerism, combining product close-ups, meticulous styling and staging. Her photographs and sculptures employee layering to confuse and undermine assumptions about class, economics, race and gender. She “teases out” the emotional meanings in everything – from clothes to figures in a landscape. “This blanket expression that you shouldn’t judge a person by their clothes is ridiculous to me,” she said. “Every article of clothing is so loaded with signifiers, I don’t know how you can help but make up stories about people and their desires based on what they wear.”

Modern Art Monday Presents: Meret Oppenheim, Fur-Covered Cup, Saucer and Spoon

Fur-Covered Cup, Saucer and Spoon
Photo By Gail

This Surrealist object was inspired by a conversation between Meret Oppenheim, (Swiss, 1913–1985) and artists Pablo Picasso and Dora Maar at a Paris cafe. Admiring Oppenheim’s fur-covered bracelet, Picasso remarked that one could cover anything with fur, to which she replied, “Even this cup and saucer.” Soon after, when asked by André Breton, Surrealism’s leader, to participate in the first Surrealist exhibition dedicated to objects, Oppenheim bought a teacup, saucer, and spoon at a department store and covered them with the fur of a Chinese gazelle. In so doing, she transformed genteel items traditionally associated with feminine decorum into sensuous, sexually punning tableware.

Fur-Covered Cup, Saucer and Spoon (1936) is part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Neon Drugs Sign

Jack Pierson Drugs (Pink and Orange)
Photo By Gail

Jack Pierson, Drugs (Pink and Orange), 2000. Neon and Transformer. Photographed at the Leila Heller Gallery on West 57th Street, NYC.