Tag Archive | Sculpture

Eyeball Dress

Eyeball Dress
All Photos By Gail

In these photos, what looks like a wearable Eyeball Dress is actually a sculpture, make up of tiny ceramic tiles, called Million Eyes Woman, by artist Marek Zyga. Photographed at the Evan Lurie Gallery Booth at the Summer 2015  Affordable Art Fair in NYC.

Eyeball Dress Detail
Eyeball Dress Detail

Group of Four Trees by Jean Dubuffet at 1 Chase Manhattan Plaza

Group of Four Trees
All Photos By Gail

Group of Four Trees (1969-72 ) by artist Jean Dubuffet is a black and white sculpture standing just in front of the black and white Chase Manhattan Bank building. The similarities between the sculpture and building, however, stop there.

Group of Four Trees Detail

The building’s straight lines and evenly-spaced rows of windows stand in contrast to the irregular surfaces of Group of Four Trees. The forms of the trees are made up of a series of varying planes, all white, and connected together by thick black outlines. The trees’ canopies lean in different directions, and the heights of the four trees are all different, making the viewer’s eye move all around the sculpture, following the many lines that are present.

Group of Four Trees Detail

The trees manage to look both big and small at the same time. Although almost dwarfed by the surrounding buildings, Group of Four Trees in turn stands high above the people who walk by. Because of the unusual shapes of the trees, and the lack of natural color, the trees seem not quite organic. They do, however, add dynamic movement to the plaza.

Group of Four Trees Detail

In 1969, David Rockefeller, then chairman of Chase Manhattan Bank, asked Jean Dubuffet to design models for a possible sculpture to be placed in front of the bank’s new building. Already, the building’s plaza included Isamu Noguchi’s Sunken Garden, completed in 1964, and the bank’s leaders wanted to add another sculpture as well.

Dubuffet submitted a number of models, of which Group of Four Trees was chosen. He then enlarged the piece for placement in the plaza. The sculpture is made of synthetic plastic over an aluminum frame, with a steel armature holding the whole piece together.

Group of Four Trees is located in the Chase Manhattan Bank Plaza, off Pine Street, between Nassau and William Streets, in NYC’s Financial District.

Kris Kuksi, Amalgamation at Joshua Liner Gallery

Ambiguous Exodus
Ambiguous Exodus (All Photos By Gail)

Joshua Liner Gallery is currently hosting Amalgamation, an exhibition of new work from Kansas-based artist Kris Kuksi. This is Kuksi’s fifth solo show with Liner and it includes seven works in the artist’s signature medium of mixed media assemblage.


When observing the delicate wall assemblages Kris Kuksi constructs, intricacy seems almost an understatement. Excessively detailed, each work plays out an epic drama meticulously assembled piece by piece. Largely influenced by the ornamental details of the late Baroque and Rococo movements, these embellished pieces possess a darkness. Chaos, downfall, and anguish are poignant struggles amongst Kuksi’s miniature models, their plight serving as commentary on humanity’s social, political and spiritual obstacles. The title of the exhibition — Amalgamation — sheds light on Kuksi’s elaborate process of collection, and also bears reference to the multiple chaotic narratives taking place in each ornate piece.

A Farewell to Arms
A Farewell to Arms

Many of the central figures in Kuksi’s assemblages resemble deities, transcending the disorder and turmoil that surround them. Rage and conflict between the smaller, less dominant figures is literally below them. In Farewell to Arms, a mythical warrior rises above a mass of smaller figures clambering beneath, struggling to keep hold of their heavy artillery.

A Farewell to Arms Detail
A Farewell to Arms, Detail

Perhaps this profound difference in size between the godlike central figure and smaller mortal figures metaphorically reveals the sheer distance humanity is from total serenity. Kuksi elaborates, “Human beings are limited by their greed and carelessness yet they know it. Humans know how to be better and solve problems that are pressing the advancement of our species but we don’t always do the right thing. We are consumed by our darkness and yet we don’t realize we don’t have to be. I think if we can embrace our dark impulses, we can overcome them.”


Sedation Detail
Sedation Detail

The process of assembling these intricate works is complex and time consuming, and sourcing the right piece to fit can take months. Balance and placement are of equal importance in the construction of the assemblages, thus resulting in the majority of the works having a symmetrical appearance. Kuksi explains, “It is balance of chaos vs. symmetry which can take lots of time just thinking out the arrangement for balance and control, rushing the process will leave too much chaos.” Aside from the painstaking arrangement of each assemblage, the artist pays special attention to every individual piece, hand painting them with careful patience. In many cases, the final result is unknown and it is the process of assemblage that builds the narrative and speaks to the artist.

Psychoactive Animalia
Psychoactive Animalia

Over the many hours spent constructing a piece, Kuksi develops a fondness for each work as he explains, “I will love a new piece I’m building and I will sink in sadness to have to come to an end just to finish it.” However, the necessity to move on and begin another work is vital to the artist’s ambition as he explains, “My hope is that my art is a tool for recognition, at least in the short term. Tomorrow is always a new struggle and a new fight for survival.”

Ambiguous Exodus Detail
Ambiguous Exodus, Detail

Imperial Rights Fighter
Imperial Rights Fighter, Bronze on Wood Base

Star Wars fans may also get kick out of this fun, hybrid sculpture.

Imperial Rights Fighter

Kuksi’s Imperial Rights Fighter is also available in a hand-painted, 3D printed multiple in a limited edition of fifty pieces. Contact the gallery for pricing and availability.

Kris Kuksi’s Amalgamation will be on Exhibit through November 14th, 2015 at Joshua Liner Gallery540 West 28th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Kris Kuksi Amalgamation Signage

Kuksi Installation View

Undulating Column Sculpture in Soho

Undulating Column
All Photos By Gail

This minimalist sculpture is (approximately) located in front of 102 Greene Street in Soho, NYC.

Undulating Column Detail

It appears be made of brushed aluminum, but who knows.

Undulating Column Plaque

This plaque, attached to the building in front of which it sits, identifies the piece as Undulating Column (1977) by artist Hans Van de Bovenkamp.

Rachel Harrison, All In the Family

All In the Family 2
All Photos By Gail

Rachel Harrison (b. 1966) deploys a wide range of influences in her work, combining art-historical and pop-cultural citations with explorations of material, color and form. Her hybrid sculptures enact a range of dialogues — between handcrafted and commercially produced objects, aesthetic and consumer goods, among others — and engage broader social and political histories of exchange.

All In the Family

All in the Family (2012), an upright, top-heavy construction painted deep aubergine, acts as a display mechanism for a bright orange Hoover Vacuum Cleaner. This classic domestic appliance poses as a sculptural artifact or a figure from a retro sitcom, while alluding to Jeff Koons’ seminal 1980s series of encased vacuum cleaners.

All In the Family Rear

Photographed at the Guggenheim Museum’s Storylines Exhibit.

Video: Flying Cherubs Kinetic Art Sculpture by Walter Rossi

This mesmerizing kinetic art sculpture by Italian Artist Walter Rossi can be observed from the first floor front window of the Agora Gallery, located at 530 West 25th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Since 2000, Rossi has been working in kinetic art. He animates action toys and other found items by using a magnetic motor. The results are like theatrical presentations; often very funny and profound at the same time. I could watch them fly around all day long!

Zheng Lu’s Water Dripping – Splashing at Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Sculpture by Zheng Lu
Water Dripping – Splashing By Zheng Lu (All Photos By Gail. Click on Any Image to Enlarge)

The gravity-defying sculpture works of Zheng Lu are deeply influenced by his study of traditional Chinese calligraphy, an art form he practiced growing up in a literary family. Zheng Lu uses language as a pictorial element, inscribing the surface of his stainless-steel sculptures with thousands of Chinese characters derived from texts and poems of historical significance.

Sculpture by Zheng Lu Detail

To create his metal sculptures, Zheng Lu begins with a plaster base. He then laser-cuts character into metal, and in a fashion similar to linking chainmail, the pictographs are connected and heated so that they can be shaped to the support. The resulting works are technically astonishing: their fluid, animated forms are charged with the energy (qi) of the universe, belying their steel composite.

Sculpture by Zheng Lu Detail 1

Zheng Lu was born in Chi Feng, Inner Mongolia, China in 1978. He lives and works in Beijing.

Sculpture by Zheng Lu Detail 2

Zheng Lu’s Water Dripping – Splashing is part of the Bright Eye of the Universe Exhibit and will be up Through October 10th, 2015 at Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Located at 547 West 27th Street, Ground Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Zheng Lu Signage