Tag Archive | Sculpture

Alice Cooper Eye Sculpture by Scott Stevens

Alice Cooper Eye Sculpture
Artwork and Photo By Scott Stevens

In a backyard garden in Austin, Texas, lush with native succulents and clusters of Baby Doll Heads on Sticks, artist Scott Stevens has built a unique totem to his favorite musical performer, Alice Cooper. Scott has given Worleygig.com an exclusive on this larger than life representation of Cooper’s iconic eye makeup and how the sculpture came to be.

“I started with a discarded metal fence pole set in a concrete plug,” Scott explains. “Once that was in the ground, I cast a concrete footer around the plug for stability. I used found metal pieces, lathing, tar paper, and lots of bell wire to tie it all together. To create the form I used Portland cement mixed with sand on top of the armature (metal framework). I learned a lot about methods and materials while putting the sculpture together.”

“The totem changes color — ranging from blue green to blackish, depending on the time of day and on the position of the sun. Although Alice’s makeup is black, I didn’t want a big black piece in the middle of all the green cacti. Home Depot pulled through for me again with an exterior satin latex that was mixed to match Liquitex Green Permanent Deep. I dug the hole on Feb 1st and finished painting on July 5th, 2014.

Scott continues that, “It was truly a labor of love – during which I battled loads of mosquitoes! I had been working on drawings of the idea for years and I was motivated to build it this year because Alice was playing a show here in Austin on July 15th (on his tour with Motley Crüe) and I was hoping he would come to visit my yard! I saw him also in Dallas on the 16th – he blew the Crüe off the stage at both stows – and will see him again in Houston on October 11th.”

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Gilberto Zorio Crystal Star with Javelins

Gilberto Zorio Crystal Star with Javelins
Crystal Star with Javelins, 1977, Glass and Steel (Photo By Gail)

Stars and Javelins are two reoccurring themes in the work of Italian sculptor, performance artist and conceptual artist Gilberto Zorio (Born 1944), who is an artist I admit I don’t know much about. I like the reflective qualities of this piece however, and the fact that it is a sculpture mounted on the wall, which is always fun. Crystal Star with Javelins is part of the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Lynda Benglis, Modern Art 1970 – 1974

Modern Art 1970-74

Modern Art 1970 – 1974 is a cast-in-two-parts Bronze and Aluminum modular sculpture by American Sculptor and Visual Artist, Lynda Benglis. The work (created between 1973 and 1974) includes four individual sculptures that are identical in form while maintaining an organic feel. To me they look like molten lead, tongues or platypus bills. Modern Art 1970 – 1974 can be viewed at NYC’s Museum of Modern Art in Painting and Sculpture II, Gallery 23, 4th Floor.

Modern Art 1970-74

Must See Art: Jeff Koons Retrospective at The Whitney Museum

Jeff Koons Retrospective Signage
Jeff Koons Retrospective Signage Depicting Michael Jackson and Bubbles Sculpture from the Banality Series (All Photos By Gail)

It is no secret that Jeff Koons is one of my most-loved artists. A lot of haters take issue with the fact that Koons is so rich and successful, like that is a bad, thing. I say, if a billionaire wants to pay $58 million dollars for one of his Balloon Dog sculptures, good for him. Good for everybody! If I had $58 Million to blow on some rad artwork, I would do the same thing. Jeff Koons!

Jeff Koons is currently the subject of a retrospective at The Whitney Museum, surveying the full scope of his career, and it is a must see show. Comprised of almost 150 objects dating from 1978 to the present, this exhibition is the most comprehensive ever devoted to Koons’ Artwork, his first major museum presentation in New York, and the first to fill nearly the entire Marcel Breuer-designed Whitney building with a single artist’s work. The Koons Retrospective will also be the final exhibition to take place there before the Whitney opens its new building in the Meatpacking District in 2015 — but what a way to go!

Mail Box with Gazing Ball
Gazing Ball Series (2013)

The Koons Retrospective fills four floors of the building including the lobby, plus the lower level (adjacent to the restaurant) and the small outdoor “garden.” The work is organized chronologically with his newest work, which includes the Gazing Ball series that debuted at the David Zwirner Gallery last year, in a lobby adjacent gallery. Geoffrey and I started on the 4th floor and worked our way down.

Non-flash photography is allowed (thank god) and I took about 100 photos. Here are some highlights from the show!

Inflatable Flowers
Inflatable Flowers

The Inflatables Series (1978–79) features works that look like weightless, air-filled plastic flowers, though the works are made of stainless Steel.

Light Mounted Toaster
Toaster Mounted on Lit Base

Pre-New (1979–80) includes a series of small, counter top kitchen appliances mounted on deco-style lit bases.

Red Telephone
Red Telephone, Pre-New Series

I never thought I would live in an era where some people will neither know how the above object is used, nor understand the significance of its red color.

Vacuum Cleaners
Vacuum Cleaners, New Series

The News Series (1980–87) features billboard-sized product adverts as well as a large collection of sculptures comprised of early model vacuum cleaners encased in vitrines lit by fluorescent tubing. These works reminded me favorably of The Carousel of Progress attraction at Disneyland.

Vacuum Cleaner Gallery View
New Series Gallery View

Basketballs in a Tank
Three Basketballs in a Tank, Equilibrium Series (1983–93)

Frangelico Ad
Frangelico Ad, Luxury and Degradation Series (1986)

Baccarat Crystal Cocktail Set
Baccarat Crystal Cocktail Service Set, Luxury and Degradation Series

Mermaid Sculpture
Mermaid, Statuary Series (1986)

Bob Hope Statue
Bob Hope, Statuary Series

Banality Series Gallery
Banality Series (1988) Installation View

Surprised Bather
Surprised Bather, Banality Series

Gilded Mirror
Gilt Mirror, Banality Series

Made in Heaven Signage
Made in Heaven Series (1989–91)

Between 1989 and 1991, Koons and his then wife, Italian Porn star and Politician Cicciolina, posed for a series of sexually explicit artworks that became the Made in Heaven Series and Coffee Table Book. While Koons and Cicciolina are unbelievably hot and fun to look at, some of these photos show lots of Peen and Vajayjay, so you are going to want to keep any kids out of the galleries that are labeled “Sexually Explicit Material/Not for Children” or something similar.

Made in Heaven
Made In Heaven Series

Koons Bust with Crystals
Koons Bust with Crystals, Made in Heaven Series

Made in Heaven Amethyst Sculpture
Made In Heaven Series Amethyst Sculpture

Pink Cake
Pink Cake, Celebration Series (1994 Onward)

The Celebration Series gallery is probably my favorite in the entire exhibit.

Purple Heart
Purple Heart, Celebration Series

Giant Pile of Play Doh
Play-Doh with Balloon Dog in the Background, Celebration Series

Pink Button
Pink Button with Random Gallery Visitor, Included for Scale, Celebration Series

Purple Giraffe Mirror
Purple Giraffe Silhouette Mirror, Easyfun Series (1999–2000)

Mirror Reflected in a Mirror
Easyfun Series

Betty Page and Dolphin
Easyfun-Ethereal Series (2000–02)

Lunch Meat Faces with Mustache
Easyfun-Ethereal Series

Beach Chairs and Seals
Seal Walrus (Chairs) Sculpture (Foreground), Elvis (Background), Popeye Series (2002 Onward)

Inflatable Lobster
Lobster, Popeye Series

Hulk Organ
Hulk (Organ), Hulk Elvis Series (2004–14)

Yellow Mirrored Sculpture
Pluto and Proserpina, Antiquity Series (2013 Onward)

Balloon Venus
Balloon Venus (Orange), Antiquity Series

I know there are a ton of photos in this post, but consider that they represent only one tenth of what’s in the exhibit and you know you gotta go check this out! I’ll be going back at least once more. Helpful Hint to Avoid Crowds: Try to get to The Whitney by 12 Noon or earlier on a weekend. Although crowds are unpredictable, an early arrival made the difference between waiting on line just inside the lobby when we arrived a line that went outside and around the block when we left!

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective Will be on Exhibit Through October 19th, 2014, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Located at 945 Madison Avenue (at 75th Street) in NYC. The exhibition then travels to the Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, Paris (November 26, 2014–April 27, 2015) and to the Guggenheim Bilbao (June 5–September 27, 2015).

Modern Art Monday Presents: De Wain Valentine, Triple Disk Red Metal Flake — Black Edge

De Wain Valentine Triple Disk Red
Triple Disk Red Metal Flake – Black Edge, 1966, Fiberglass Reinforced Polyester (All Photos By Gail)

Commentary on this work of art provided by Museum Director, Glenn Lowry and Curator, Leah Dickerman.

Glenn Lowry: After moving to Venice Beach, California in 1965, De Wain Valentine helped shape a new style of art that combined aspects of Minimalism with a distinctive West Coast flair.

Leah Dickerman: You can see the lessons of Minimalism, that idea of a new type of sculpture that’s defined by color, simple organization, bodily scale, repeated units of form. But that cherry, candy finish with metal flakes is unmistakably California, and those rounded shapes and luscious colors that have an erotic charge is a vocabulary that isn’t at all New York.

De Wain Valentine Triple Disk Red
Alternate View

G L: Valentine had an interest in industrial plastics and resins—materials used for cars and surfboards.

L D: That shiny, glittery surface adds a kind of perceptual instability to the object. And there’s lots of photographs where you see Valentine working on these objects, polishing and buffing them with all of the fanaticism of car and surf buffs. So it’s easy to see how work like this won the nickname “Fetish Finish.”

Triple Disk Red Finish
Finish Close Up

De Wain Valentine’s Triple Disk Red Metal Flake — Black Edge
is part of the Permanent Collection at NYC’s Museum of Modern Art.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Yayoi Kusama’s Accumulation No.1

Yayoi Kusama Accumulation No.1
Accumulation No. 1, 1962 (Photos By Gail)

Japanese sculptor, painter, writer, installation artist and performance artist Yayoi Kusama is one of my favorite living artists, because she is just so darn rad. This week, Yayoi makes her Modern Art Monday debut. Welcome, talented lady!

In the early 1960s Kusama began to cover items such as ladders, shoes and chairs with white phallic protrusions made of stuffed sewn cloth. With their humorous, sexualized transformation of domestic objects beginning with furniture, but spreading eventually to clothing, shoes and even kitchen equipment, Kusama’s Accumulations represent a remarkably prescient example of contemporary art that wrestles with issues of gender. This aspect of the Accumulations shocked male contemporary art critics of the time who — too embarrassed to acknowledge their explicit expression of female rage at male domination — described them with anodyne art-speak phrases like “the semantics of mono-surfacing.” Even today, a work like Accumulation No. 1 is much more disturbing to look at than the Infinity Net paintings with which it was often exhibited. Equally recognizable as a signature work by Kusama, Accumulation No. 1 is arguably more revolutionary in form and challenging in content than its painterly counterparts.

Accumulation No. 1, purchased by the Museum of Modern Art in 2012, is now part of its permanent collection. See this fun work in the museum’s fourth-floor Painting and Sculpture Galleries.

Yayoi Kusama Accumulation No.1

Modern Art Monday Presents: Lucas Samaras, Book 4

Lucas Samaras Book 4
Book 4, 1962: Book with Pins, Table Knife, Scissors, Razor Blade, Metal Foil, Piece of Glass and Plastic Rod (All Photos By Gail)

From MOMA Dot Org:

In 1960 Samaras began a series of Surrealist-inspired boxes filled with personal materials that he encrusted in needles, mirrors, shards of glass, and brightly colored beads. The boxes were followed by room–sized installations and subversive Polaroid self–portraits. Like Samaras’s boxes, Book is a multifaceted object and a miniature world in itself. Although it includes eight fictional narratives written by the artist between 1959 and 1967, it is not a storybook. Each thick amoeba–shaped page contains surprises, such as pop–ups, pockets, interlocking layers, foldouts, and hidden pamphlets. Samaras’s working maquette (scale model) for Book offers a glimpse of the handcrafted origin of this sculptural book.

Book 4 is part of the permanent collection at NYC’s Museum of Modern Art.

Lucas Samaras Book 4

Lucas Samaras Book 4

John Clement’s Fireflies at De Buck Gallery

John Clement Fireflies
John Clement, Fireflies, Painted Steel (All Photos By Gail)

De Buck Gallery is currently hosting an exhibition by New York-based sculptor John Clement, entitled Fireflies Clement’s artistic language, which entails a spirited geometry of curving forms and gaping voids, embodies an evolving interest in capturing and interacting with both viewers and the environment which has been a cornerstone of the artist’s work since the 1990s.

John Clement Houdini
Houdini

For Fireflies, Clement has created a large-scale site-specific installation for De Buck Gallery, bringing what would typically be an outdoor, public work into the white cube of the gallery space. Juxtaposed with small and medium scale sculptures, the exhibition provides a compelling overview of the transformation of Clement’s vocabulary through size, scale, color and shape.

John Clement Awho
Awho

Installed together, the effortless and endless variation of curves and negative space on multiple planes seen throughout Clement’s works implore further exploration on the part of the viewer. In the artist’s hands, the thick tubes of steel with which he works seem weightless and even mobile, molding the perception of the surrounding space.

See a slideshow of John Clement’s related painted steel sculptures at This Link.

John Clement Tailpipe and  Oscar
Tailpipe and Oscar

John Clement’s Fireflies will be on Exhibit Through July 25th, 2014 at De Buck Gallery, Located at 545 West 23rd Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

New Paintings by Mark Kostabi at Martin Lawrence Galleries

Kostabi Signage
All Art By Mark Kostabi. All Photos By Gail

Do you enjoy looking at the paintings of contemporary pop artist Mark Kostabi? I sure do. There are a few reasons why I never miss an opening reception for an exhibit of Mark’s work: not only is there a ton of great art to look at and talk about with other cool, art-loving people, but it is always a good party and a chance to, as it is sometimes referred to in the vernacular, “make the scene.” And I enjoy making the scene.

Kostabi Sculpture
I got a good shot of this sculpture, because no one else was in the gallery yet.

Just this past Thursday, I had a chance to make the scene at Mark’s current exhibit, which is going on at the Martin Lawrence Galleries on West Broadway — a very nice venue. Before I get to talking about the paintings, I want to point out how this artist reception differed from 99% of all other art openings. Please see visual documentation below.

Cheese Donuts

Look at all that cheese!

Cheese Donuts 2

Celebrity Photographer Derek Storm was overheard to say that these wheels of fine, spreadable soft cheeses reminded him of Donuts. Mmm…cheese donuts.

Cheese and Fruit Plate

So much free cheese was available — and also, wine! — it was pretty much the greatest art opening, ever. It looks like the cheese extravaganza was sponsored by a place called Castello Cheesemonger. Their cheese made me happy.

Now, on to the Art! A good number of Mark’s new paintings belong to series I made up in my head called “Barbie’s Happy Fun Day on Acid.” Get an idea of what I am talking about below.

Dancing Girl

Dancing Barbie on Acid.

Sleeping Person

Barbie Dreams of Being On Acid.

Full Length Mirror

Barbie’s Self-Reflection (On Acid).

Do you see what I mean? I love all these paintings. You can interpret them to mean what ever you want, really. Art!

Red and Black

The last time I saw this very beautiful painting, it was sitting on the floor of Mark’s studio, Kostabi World. Now, it is in a gallery and you can buy it!

Consumerism

I interpret the above painting to be a statement on consumerism and how it weighs you down like little men are hanging on to your legs.

I deliberately left the rack of chimes in that photo to remind me to mention that Mark is not only an amazing artist but also a gifted composer and wildly talented pianist. At the opening, Mark performed a few of his original compositions with his trio that includes Bassist Paul Nowniski and Drummer Keith LeBlanc. It was awesome.

Twister Sister

The painting above is called Twister Sister and it is of a lady (Acid Barbie, perhaps) playing a game of Twister on a Damien Hirst Spot Painting. I desire to own it.

Piano with Couple

This one is cool, because it goes from being in Black and White to being in Color — just like the Wizard of Oz!

Warhol Kostabi Basquiat

This is a photo from the ’80s of Mark with Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat, in which the coolness factor is off the charts.

NYC Window

I love this one a lot, too.

Angel with Cat

And this one, of an Angel with her Cat. What is making that pink glow that you see leading down from the ladder? I want to find out.

Thoughtful Angel

This is definitely a must-see exhibit, so don’t miss it!

Martin Lawrence Galleries is located at 457 West Broadway (Between Houston and Prince) in Soho, NYC.

Kostabi Painting with Signature

Modern Art Monday Presents: Louise Bourgeois, Quarantania, I

LouiseBourgeois, “Quarantania, I,”
Louise Bourgeois, Quarantania, I, 1947-53; reassembled by the artist 1981 (Photo By Gail)

French-born Louise Bourgeois made these wooden totem-like figures early on in her career. In this piece, she brings together several of those individual pieces on a single base.

According to MOMA Curator, Deborah Wye, the sculptures were meant to not only represent friends and family that she had left behind when she left Paris and moved to the United States, but also her family at this time, including her husband and three small boys. The figure in the middle has three appendages attached to it, and this piece, when it was shown by itself, is called Woman with Packages. Bourgeois had said that these represented her three children who she was responsible for, and she felt were always attached to her in one way or another.

Louise Bourgeois passed away in 2010, at the age of 98. She was actively creating art right up until the time of her death.