Tag Archive | The Beatles

Ken Regan’s Uncovered at Morrison Hotel Gallery

The Beatles
All Photos By Gail

It’s been a while (i.e. way too long) since we had the chance to stop by an opening reception at Morrison Hotel Gallery on Prince Street in Soho. Fortunately, we remedied that situation by hitting the party for Uncovered, a selection of 60s-era Black & White photography from New York based legend, Ken Regan.

The Beatles
The Beatles

For me, the sign of an excellent music photography exhibit is one that shows me at least one photo of The Beatles that I’ve not seen before. So: score, a direct hit. The above shot of the Fab Four is not only previously unknown to me, it’s  simply a fucking fantastic photo. You could live an entire lifetime in that photograph — and Ken Regan took it.

Batman Party
Left, Batman Party. Right, JFK

Regan, who passed away in November of 2012, was not an artist who let himself be pigeonholed into just one area of photography, as his portfolio included not only pop music icons and movie starts, but also sports, politics, fashion and landscape photography. Featuring mostly photographs from between 1960 to 1970, Uncovered provide an excellent cross section of Ken’s vast body of work.

Here are a few of our favorite pieces from the show.

Bridget Bardot
Bridget Bardot

Black Panthers
Black Panthers

Yves Saint Laurent (On the Right)

This one is blurry because I was trying to hold a glass of wine in one hand and take a picture with the other. Multi-tasking!

Rich Lady

I don’t know who this lady is, but she looks pretty fabulous.

John John and Jackie
John John and Jackie

This photo breaks my heart a million times.

Bobby Kennedy

Social Unrest

Ken was also a great news photographer, because he was able to distill the action with just one shot. Amazing.

Uncovered: A Decade of Images by Ken Regan will be on Exhibit Only Through July 3rd, 2015 at Morrison Hotel Gallery, Located Upstairs at 116 Prince Street, Soho, NYC.

Ken Regan Uncovered Signage

MHG Signage

Ron English Hulk Baby Mural at Bowery and Houston

Hulk Baby Mural Full
All Photos By Gail

Legendary street artist and social satirist Ron English’s Hulk Baby Mural has been on display at the corner of Houston and Bowery since late April, but you know sometimes we arrive a little late to the party, because so much else is going on. Because, NYC!

The selfie-friendly mural shows English’s Hulk Baby character (AKA Temper Tot) set against a patchwork American flag, featuring reproductions of the many scathing corporate/brand parodies, memes and unique characters he has introduced over the past two decades as “guerilla” billboards, paintings and collectible art toys. Here are a few of our favorites.

The Missing Link

But it wasn’t Big Foot, it was Gay Foot.

You Are Not Here
You Are Not Here

Kiss Kids
Kiss Kidz on Coke

The child model in many of Ron’s paintings is actually his son, Mars English who is perhaps a teenager by now, and an artist in his own right.

King of Beers
King of Jews, King of Beers

You Are Not a Clone
You Are Not a Clone

Grinning Skull

The Grinning Skull is one of English’s most famous images.

Morrison Cigarettes
Light My Fire

I could be wrong, but I think Ron might like to smoke pot.

Evolution Not For Everybody

Clearly not.

Beatles on iTunes

This is one of my favorites.

You could spend hours discovering new images on the Hulk Baby billboard and it’s certainly worth paying a leisurely visit.

Hulk Baby Close Up

Video Clip of The Week: Blur, “Lonesome Street”

There were a number of years in the early to mid-nineties when British Pop band Blur were my very favorite band in the Universe and, in fact, I got quite obsessed and silly over them. But I don’t regret any of that, because back when Blur and their perceived musical nemesis, Oasis, were duking it out in the British press for Band of the Century or whatever, Blur were undeniably the shit. There are tracks off of Park Life that I’d put up against anything in The Beatles‘ catalog any day of the week. Just being serious.

Well, the big news is that, after years and years of being broken up, Blur have recorded a new album together, which is called The Magic Whip, and it is quite good. A few videos for various songs are already on the YouTube, but I like this one for the song “Lonesome Street” which features what could become a viral dance craze as far-reaching as that pony dance they do in the video for the mystifyingly popular “Gangnam Style,” but that is just my opinion. The Magic Whip is released April 27th, 2015. Enjoy!

Blur Lonesome Street Still

Abbey Road Bananas

Abbey Road Bananas
Image Source

Dutch artist Stephan Brusche makes fun art on and with the skin of the delicious Banana. Here, he has demonstrated his technique with a rendering of the famous cover of The Beatles’ album, Abbey Road. So clever!

See more of Stephan’s banana art at This Link!

More Of Mr. OneTeas’s Wack Donald’s Project: John Lennon and Alfred E. Newman

Wack Donald's Lennon and Newman
Photo By Gail

It looks like street artist Mr. OneTeas is at it again with his very fun Wack Donald’s Project, in which he paints the clown face of Ronald McDonald on various pop culture icons. I spotted John Lennon and Alfred E. Newman side by side on a traffic barrier at 26th Street and 11th Avenue in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Show Review: Lennon: Through a Glass Onion

Lennon Glass Onion Poster

For Beatles fans who crave an authentic performance experience of the group’s expansive catalog of music, there is certainly no shortage of grand scale productions, which range from Rain and Let it Be on Broadway to 1964 The Tribute – an act that regularly sells out Carnegie Hall. But for fans who maintain a keen interest in the life and post-Beatles career of John Lennon specifically, Lennon: Through a Glass Onion offers something completely different.

Now in evening and matinee performances at the Union Square Theater, Lennon: Through a Glass Onion, is an intimate, two-man show featuring esteemed actor and singer John R. Waters and accompanist Stewart D’Arrietta, which originally saw sell-out tours in the duo’s native Australia. While there are no dazzling lights, clever sets, informative backdrops or special effects to bolster this very stripped down production, what you get is a heartfelt acoustic performance (guitar and piano – and D’Arrietta’s piano playing is quite excellent) of a selection of over thirty of John Lennon’s best and most autobiographical songs – both written with Paul McCartney while in The Beatles, and written and recorded by Lennon as a solo artist.

Tying the musical numbers together is Water’s biographical narrative of John Lennon’s often traumatic youth and tumultuous adulthood, the ups and down of which are punctuated and fleshed out by songs he wrote at that time. Although Water’s speaking voice is appealingly similar to Lennon’s, his (often quite gravelly) singing voice is not, so don’t expect the “close your eyes and imagine it is really him” effect that you can get with so many tributes. Through a Glass Onion is really more like watching two hardcore John Lennon fans perform his songs and talk about his life in a pub setting. This may or may not be your thing, so just know what you are walking into a ahead of time.

In order to fit thirty songs into a 90-minute run time, many of the songs are performed as excerpts of various lengths, but you get the idea. Likewise, some liberty is taken with traditional arrangements, which finds “Help!” – one of The Beatles‘ most exhilarating anthems – performed almost as a dirge. Sometimes the alternative arrangements work and other times not so much.

It’s also unclear how much of the biographical information is simply improvised or creatively extrapolated based on various facts but, again, it is easy to imagine that Waters is speaking as Lennon and the story all comes together. As an aside, fans seeking more information about John Lennon’s life as a child and teenager, including the not-very-happy story about his relationship with his mother Julia – which had such a profound influence on so many of his songs — might be better served by the 2009 film, Nowhere Boy. You can find it on Netflix.

An added note about the venue, for those who’ve not yet been to the Union Square Theater, is that you are in for treat in this pristinely maintained, old school theater where every very comfy seat offers optimal viewing, so you don’t have to stretch your ticket buying budget to get the best seat in the house. The theater is also conveniently located three blocks uptown from the Union Square subway hub and is within blocks of dozens of excellent restaurants — so you can plan a night of it!

Lennon: Through a Glass Onion will run through February 22nd, 2015 at the Union Square Theater, located at 100 East 17th Street (Between Park Ave South and Irving Place), New York, NY 10003. Visit Lennon Onstage Dot Com for more information about the show, to get show times and to purchase tickets!

Artist Shepard Fairey to Release Limited-Edition Art Prints: Poster For George

George Harrison Silver
Poster for George: Silver Edition (Images Courtesy of Big Hassle PR)

There is no denying that George Harrison was a ridiculous babe, as evidence by the above poster, which was created by Shepard Fairey based on a photograph by Astrid Kirchherr. I want to own it.

Poster For George will be offered in two editions — Red and Silver — as a tie-in with the recent release of the CD Box Set, George Harrison: The Apple Years 1968-75. Both editions are limited to 400 signed and numbered copies. The posters are being sold one day apart and via separate webstores, as detailed below.

The Silver Edition (pictured above) is an 18×24″ Screen Print, which be released October 24th, 2014 at 10:00 AM PST through the George Harrison web store located: This Link.

George Harrison Red

The Red Edition will go on sale on October 23rd, at a random time between 10:00 AM and 12 Noon PST through Fairey’s Obey Giant Web Store. Both poster editions will sell for $65 each and here is a limit of 1 print per household/person.

About the posters, Shepard Fairey remarked: “My parents were Beatles fans and introduced me to them at a young age. In college, I grew to especially love the later Beatles albums like Sgt. Pepper, The White Album, and Abbey Road. George Harrison started to contribute more songs to the later Beatles albums that were just as strong as any Lennon-McCartney compositions.

I got George Harrison’s All Things Must Pass album a long time ago, but even as a kid listening to the radio I reacted very emotionally to the song “My Sweet Lord.” The song has a profound beauty and melancholy that is unique and powerful. I love George’s solo material musically, but what speaks to me most about George’s music and actions is his humanity and his soulfulness.

I think George looked at himself as a world citizen, and not only brought international influences into his music, but was sensitive to human rights and politics around the globe. I’ve always seen music and art as amazing pleasures, but also as relatable vehicles to deliver a point of view. Art and music can invite people to think about something they might ordinarily not be interested in.

George put together the Concert For Bangladesh as a way of using his music to benefit humanity. I admire that he went beyond just writing songs addressing issues, and used his significant cultural weight to be an activist and put something noteworthy together, both as a way of raising money for Bangladesh, and of publicizing the situation there. George is a hero.”