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Modern Art Monday Presents: Marie Bashkirtseff, In The Studio

in the studio by marie bashkirtseff photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Marie Bashkirtseff (18581884) was one of the most outspoken and persistent advocates for a woman’s art academy in Paris. The dynamic scene on In The Studio (1881) depicts the artist (foreground, tipping her palette forward) alongside her peers at the Académie Julian as they work from a draped male model. Founded by Rodolphe Julian in 1868, the Académie originally permitted men and women to work side by side from a live nude model, but as news of assumed impropriety spread, Julian created separate studios for men and women. Julian’s school  was one of a handful in Paris to provide women with rigorous artistic training. Dying of tuberculosis at the age of 25, Bashkirtseff lived just long enough to emerge as an intellectual in Paris in the 1880s.

Photographed as Part of The Exhibit Women Artists In Paris at The Clark Institute, Located in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

Jean Shin’s Floating Maize at Brookfield Place

jean shin installation photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Fans of this blog will know that I am way into repurposing and recycling items that would otherwise end up in a landfill into both functional items and aesthetically pleasing works of art, so when I read about Floating Maize, artist Jean Shin’s new public art installation at the Brookfield Place mall, I braved the subway to get down there to check it out.

jean shin installation photo by gail worley
jean shin installation photo by gail worley

Known for her inventive works that transform discarded materials into elegant expressions of place and identity, Jean Shin’s art and practice is ingrained with the idea of sustainability. With that in mind, Shin has repurposed thousands of green plastic soda bottles into an elaborate installation that resembles an artificial landscape.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Amedeo Modigliani, Portrait of a Medium

portrait of a medium by amedeo modigliani photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Amedeo Modigliani’s mother wrote that at about the age of fifteen the artist attended is first seance. His youthful spiritual and esoteric inclinations took him in the direction of the occult, reflected in this drawing, Portrait of a Medium (1906), made from memory, of a session he attended in Venice, where he studied for two years before coming to Paris.

Photographed in the Jewish Museum in NYC.

Greatest Documentaries, Movies, And Series About Cannabis

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Cannabis, weed, or whatever you call it, has been a part of popular culture and entertainment for centuries. A lot has been said about this plant; discover here what stands out from the rest when it comes to weed on the screen!

Making a Story

These stories have documented the rise of the cannabis industry from obscurity to legitimate business ventures through the CBD products that do not have THC – the psychotropic ingredient that gives the feeling of being high. The latest installments will have you considering the multiple benefits of starting a business with certified CBD hemp seed for sale and making it in the industry yourself.

The Business of Drugs (2020)

This documentary premiered on Netflix and exclusively speaks about the business side of the cannabis plant. It explores the opportunities that are available from the growing of the plant to the creation of high-tech by-products. A far cry from the Cheech & Chong type of production and narrative associated with cannabis. A great choice for those looking for a seriously in-depth look at what goes on behind the scenes of a weed business.

The Future of Weed: High Country (2013)

A production of journalism and reality content Vice, The Future of Weed: High Country gives us an inside peek into all the technology invested in making cannabis products. With a little bit of history and science sprinkled on, the documentary shows just how far the interest of the health industry, with its science, has impacted advancements and taken weed to another level. This one is for the tech-savvy people and those that want to look at the future of cannabis.

Pineapple Express Poster

Pineapple Express (2008)

An explosive, hilarious story of two unlikely friends, danger, and weed, starring James Franco and Seth Rogen. This unpredictable comedy was an immediate success, and stands out in weed films, for its action storyline and solid final results. Pineapple Express is one of those films that has you wondering where your weed limits are, so you don’t end up in the same trouble as the characters. Great for relaxing on the couch with some snacks, with a lot of laughs and excitement.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Berthe Morisot, Lucie León at the Piano

lucie león at the piano photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Throughout the 1800s, playing the piano was considered obligatory for the educated and upper class, and many artists depicted girls and women at the piano. Although little is known about the relationship between Berthe Morisot and her subject, Lucie León spent the majority of her childhood training to be a concert pianist. Yet rather than depicting León from behind or in profile — as so many of her male peers do in their portrayals of female pianists — Morisot renders the young artist mid-recital without any visible sheet music, a virtuoso in command of both her instrument and our gaze.

Lucie León at the Piano (1892) was Photographed as Part of The Exhibit Women Artists In Paris at The Clark Institute, Located in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

Alexander Calder’s Saurien Sculpture on 57th Street

alexander calder saurien sculpture photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

In the absence of any organized celebrations for the holiday, I spent the afternoon of July 4th stretching my legs in midtown and enjoying the sites ‘on exhibit’ in the museum of the streets. At the southwest corner of Madison Avenue and 57th Street, I paused to appreciate a monumental sculpture that I’ve been passing by for years now, which is Alexander Calder’s bright orange, steel installation known as Saurien.

alexander calder saurien sculpture photo by gail worley

Saurien reaches a height of 18 feet at its tallest point, and the piece reminds me of one of Louis Bourgeois‘ monumental spiders, in that it stretches its ‘legs’ across the entrance to the IBM building, inviting visitors to walk under and around it. Although I’ve never read this in a formal description of the sculpture, one critic has claimed that this Calder is clearly meant to represent a dinosaur, with its stegosaurus-like spikes emerging from the top two arches. I can see that.

calder sculpture detail photo by gail worley

The irregular-edged, top forms inspired me to take this shot, with the spikes set in contrast against the skyline. Artsy!

alexander calder saurien sculture photo by gail worley

While Calder is most famous for his kinetic sculptures and delicate, hanging mobiles, Saurien is an example of the artist’s fixed work, which are called stabiles. Saurien was created in Calder’s Connecticut studio in 1975.

alexander calder saurien scuplture photo by gail worley

Alexander Calder’s Saurien is Located in Front of the IBM Building in Midtown, at 590 Madison Avenue, on the Southwest Corner at 57th Street, NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Claude Monet, Arrival of the Normandy Train, Gare Saint-Lazare

arrival of the normandy train photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

The Gare Saint-Lazare was the largest and busiest train station in Paris. Early in 1877, with help from his friend Gustave Caillebotte, Claude Monet rented an apartment in the nearby rue Moncey and began painting the first of twelve canvases showing this icon of modernity. Monet displayed seven of them, including this one, at the third Impressionist exhibition, in April of that year. Legend has it that he arranged to have the standing locomotives stoked with extra coal, so that he could observe and paint the effects of belching steam — dull grey when trapped inside the station, but white and cloudlike when seen against the sky.

Arrival of the Normandy Train, Gare Saint-Lazare (1877) was Photographed at  the Institute, Chicago.

Pink Thing of The Day: Slum Sex By Schizo 27

slum sex by schizo 27 photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

Ah, pandemic-themed street art: I love it. Slum Sex (spray-painted sometimes in Pink, and sometimes not) is a tag by renegade street artist Schizo 27 (@shizo27), who is a member of the 2wo 7even Bandits; a crew that actually rejects the name ‘crew’ and instead refer to themselves as a team of art ‘Bandits.’ This, I  also love. All members of the 2wo 7even Bandits add the number 27 to their tags.

slum sex by schizo 27 photo by gail worley

The 2wo 7even Bandits occasionally hold free Street Art Shows, where they paint discarded items (also known as trash) and buyers can pick up anything that strikes their fancy. Follow them on Instagram (@2wo_7even_bandits), for more information!

Photographed in Freeman Alley!

Breakthrough By SacSix

breakthrough by sac six photo by gail worley

Here’s a new artwork by street artist SacSix that you’re probably already seeing all over the city. Break Through depicts the instantly recognizable hand of Mickey Mouse making the Peace Sign, where his two fingers literally  ‘break through’ the fabric of the white glove he wears. Pretty heavy.  According to the artist, “2020 is the time to break through the white glove of racism and oppression. Time for Equality. Justice. Peace. RIP George.” This piece is a ‘sign of the times’ if there ever was one.

breakthrough by sac six photo by gail worley

Above Images Photographed in Freeman Alley, NYC.

breakthrough by sac six photo by gail worley

Here it is Again, Sharing Space With an Outdoor Cafe on Mercer Street in Soho.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, At The Moulin Rouge

toulouse lautrec at the moulin rouge photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s association with the Moulin Rouge began when it opened in 1889 and the owner bought the artist’s Equestrienne (at the Cirque Fernanado) to decorate the foyer. Lautrec populated the scene depicted in At The Moulin Rouge (1892/95) with portraits of the regulars at the dance hall, including himself — the diminutive figure in the center background — accompanied by his cousin and frequent companion, the physician Gabriel Tapie de Celeyran. The woman on the right is the scandalous English singer Mary Milton. At some point, the artist or his dealer cut down the canvas to remove her from the composition, perhaps because her shocking appearance made the work hard to sell. In any case, by 1914 the cut section had been reattached to the painting.

Photographed in the Art Institute, Chicago.