Archives

Orange Dum Dums: For A Special Kind of Sucker

orange dumdum dump photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

It’s a good thing I have a sharp eye or I would have walked right by this fun street art sticker, which cleverly portrays the hideous orange face of Dump as an Orange Dum Dums sucker! Bwhahahaha! They got the sucking part right, that is for sure. Just six more that of this loser. January 20th can’t come soon enough.

orange dumdum trump photo by gail worley

Photographed at the Southeast Corner 23rd Street and 8th Avenue.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Diego Rivera, Cubist Landscape

cubist landscape diego rivera photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Cubist Landscape (1912) was inspired by a trip that Diego Rivera made to Spain on 1911, where he encountered the olive trees of Catalonia. The serrated blue ridge in the painting evokes Montserrat, a mountain in the region. The work exemplifies the idiosyncratic approach to Cubism that Rivera developed in the 1910s, when he lived in Paris. He saw these early works, which combine a sun-drenched palette with kaleidoscopic planes and abstract patterning, as a way of beginning to forge a specifically Mexican modernism. “My Cubist paintings,” he said, “are my most Mexican.”

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Postcards From The Edge: A Massive Show of Tiny Art Makes Virtual Debut January 9th, 2021!

postcards from the edge signage

Do you miss going to art galleries? I sure do. I know that many galleries have reopened, but as a fairly enthusiastic fan who used to spend nearly every Thursday evening roaming the streets of Chelsea, the scene just feels so dead while Covid keeps us from gathering together to celebrate our shared passion for art. Art! Because of this — even though I’ve been hitting the museums pretty hard — I’ve been feeling rather art-starved over the past year, and that’s just a shame.

postcards from the edge feather guy

I am overjoyed then to tell you of a Massive Show of Tiny Art called Postcards From the Edge that will allow you to get your art-fix on from the safety of your own home,  because the whole thing is happening online! But wait, theres more: Postcards From the Edge will allow you to purchase original artworks — many from celebrated artists — for just $85! Not to mention, but you can see I am about to, proceeds from all sales of the art will support a charitable cause! Win, Win, Win! The exhibit kicks off on January 9th and runs through the 15th.  Postcards From The Edge will be a must-attend event for Artists and Collectors, with artworks by Deborah Kass, Julie Mehretu, Amy Sillman, William Wegman, Liliana Porter, Robert Longo, Marilyn Minter, Catherine Opie, Jim Hodges, Louis Fratino, Hans Haacke and many more available for the unheard of price just $85 each Here’s how it works.

Post Continues, With All the Details, After The Jump!

Continue reading

Koi Fish Stencil Art By Jeremy Novy

sidewalk koi stencil art photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

This cool Koi Fish stencil art is one of the better-known images in the ouvre of California-based Street Artist/Activist Jeremy Novy. There was a larger Koi Fish piece in Freeman Alley a while back but it got obliterated by foot-traffic before I had the chance to see it, so it was a nice surprise to find this when I was walking home from Pearl River Mart this past November. See more of Novy’s art by following him on Instagram.

sidewalk koi stencil art jeremy novy photo by gail worley

Photographed on Walker Street, Just East of Broadway, in Chinatown, NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Raúl Lozza, Relief No. 30

raul lozza relief no 30 photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

In works such as Relief No. 30 (1946), Raúl Lozza fragmented the surface of painting into discrete parts — usually, irregular geometric shapes — that he fixed in a particular configuration with connecting rods. Known as Coplanals, these constructions are placed directly onto the wall without any framing mechanism. The empty space in between their shapes thus becomes a part of the work.

Lozza investigated the possibilities of the coplanal for years, founding the Perceptismo group with his brothers. They developed a mathematical approach to painting that focused on the relationship between the wall and the coplanal’s dimensions and colors.

Photographed the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Beauty in Banality: The Art of Jennifer Small

jennifer small art 7X  cropped
All Images Courtesy of Robert Berry Gallery

Since the Chelsea galleries reopened a few months ago, there has not been much on exhibit that has compelled me to leave my house in order to see the art in person. I felt differently, however, when I received an email announcing an exhibit of new paintings from Wilmington, DE-based painter Jennifer Small. As soon as I saw her bold and colorful canvases featuring abstract shapes and patterns, they reminded me of the shaped, sculptural paintings by Beverly Fishman as well as the furniture designs of Shiro Kuramata. It delighted me to imagine what a line of art furniture from the mind of this artist might look like. I wanted to see these paintings in person right away. Sadly, I was informed that the show was viewable online only, but gallerist Robert Berry was kind enough ask Jennifer for a statement about her work exclusively for this post. Sweet.

jennifer small work detail
Detail of Work from Above Photo

jennifer small art 12xx

Beauty in Banality is about seeing everyday routine as an opportunity to absorb visual curiosities in situations or places that are often overlooked,” Jennifer explains. “I use abstraction to elevate these glimpses of ordinary environments into bold, engaging compositions that can live in a white cube gallery space but are still approachable and relatable because they are grounded in observations of common things.” It’s nice to know that I am not alone in having taken inspiration from my post-lockdown neighborhood walks.

jennifer small art 2xx

“The majority of the paintings in Beauty in Banality were made since the Covid-19 lockdown this past year,” she continues. “I was inspired by walking my dog around the block, witnessing caution tape around playgrounds and abandoned soccer fields. My paintings become a visual diary of my movements in a specific time and place.”

jennifer small art 9x

Suggestive of the works of Thomas Nozkowski, Richard Diebenkorn’s Ocean Park Series, and Wendy White, Small’s work often features a major focal point, as well as secondary items, creating visual interest with neutral areas juxtaposed with detailed patterning. Find out more about Jennifer Small, and see all of the fourteen works featured in the Beauty of Banality series, through January 10th 2021, by visiting  the Robert Berry Gallery.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Ferdinand Lured By Ariel By Sir John Everett Millais

ferdinand lured by ariel photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Sir John Everett Millais (18291896) opened up new terrain in this scene from Shakespeare’s The Tempest. The shipwrecked prince Ferdinand can hear, but not see, the sprite Ariel, who strums a stringed abalone shell and lifts the hero’s hat to sing in his ear. Determined to be true to nature, the young artist took eye-catching color and minutely observed detail to unconventional limits. He adopted the novel approach painting the background outdoors, zealously delineating “every blade of grass and leaf distinct.” By contrast, Ariel and the noisemaking imps are whimsically fantastical. Exhibited at London’s Royal Academy in 1850, Ferdinand Lured By Ariel proclaimed the insurgent ambitions of Millais and his friends in the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, so named because their innovative style took inspiration from art made before Raphael (14831520).

Photographed in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Tabletop Christmas Trees

pink christmas tree decorations photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

If you’ve been paying attention at all, you know by now that the Pink Thing of The Day posts every Friday, with no exceptions. So why,  you may wonder, am I posting Pink Things on a Thursday? Well, it is certainly because tomorrow is Christmas, and I have something even better than these assorted Pink Tabletop Christmas Tree Decorations waiting for you this Friday! You’ll see what I mean tomorrow!

Photographed at the New York Now Home and Gift Show at Javits Center in 2019.

pink christmas tree decorations photo by gail worley

Trump As The Grim Reaper Mural By Pure Genius

dont be afraid of covid mural photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail Worley

Yes, that is in fact Dump as the Grim Reaper himself in this expansive mural from street artist Pure.Genius. The Dump Reaper’s ignorant declaration, “Don’t be afraid of Covid,” perfectly distills his administration’s campaign of propaganda and misinformation that has lead to hundreds of thousand of needless deaths in this country to date.

dont be afraid of covid mural photo by gail worley

Thank Christ he’ll be gone soon, though not soon enough. This mural is painted near the southeast corner of Houston and Bowery in NYC.

dont be afraid of covid photo by gail worley

Modern Art Monday Presents: Christmas-time, The Blodgett Family By Eastman Johnson

christmastime the blodgett family photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Jonathan Eastman Johnson (18241906) was an American painter and co-founder of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In this painting from 1864, Johnson depicts merchant William Tilden Blodgett and his family in the parlor of their Manhattan home. Painted toward the end of the Civil War, the serene interior only hints at the urgent issue of Black emancipation through a kinetic toy seen on the table (click the image to enlarge for detail). Suggestive of a minstrel figure and outfitted as a Union recruit, its presence underlines Blodgett’s abolitionist sympathies and the complexity of racial stereotyping at this time. Along with Johnson, Blodgett would later serve as a trustee of The Met, securing funds for the purchase of the 174 European pantings in 1871, which included works by Anthony van Dyck and Francesco Giardi.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibition, Making the Met, 1870-2020, a Celebration of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 150 Year Anniversary.