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Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Ladies Room

pink bathroom 2 photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

To be at an exhibit called Pink Jungle (at NYC’s Makeup Museum) and then to be further surprised by the discovery that they have a Pink Ladies Room is to be a very happy girl indeed. So. Much. Pink.

pink bathroom 3 photo by gail worley

The bathroom was also very clean and well-stocked with supplies. All good.

pink bathroom photo by gail worley

Eye On Design: Rabbit Waiter Brooch By Raymond Yard

rabbit brooch photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Raymond C. Yard (18851964) is considered to be one of the great Art Deco jewelers. After mastering the art of jewelry making at Marcus & Co., Yard opened his own shop at 607 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan in 1922. Between 1928 and 1933 he created a series of charming Rabbit Brooches, each of which differs slightly, featuring fine details of gold, diamonds, rubies and sapphires. That the Rabbit Waiter brooch (1930) serves alcoholic drinks during Prohibition adds a certain humor to the whimsy, which would have appealed to Yard’s high-society clientele.

Photographed in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Opalescent Glass Vase By Philip Webb

venetian glass vase by philip webb photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Rediscovered Venetian glass techniques inspired James Powell and Sons to experiment with making light and lithe shapes at its Whitefriars Gassworks factory.

venetian glass vase by philip webb photo by gail worley

Among the new forms invented were these ethereal vases with rippling rims and opalescent colors. The firm also made simpler shapes, such as the footed goblet.

venetian glass vase by philip webb photo by gail worley

The featured ‘Straw Opal’ glass vase (circa 1890) was originally designed by Architect Philip Webb for Red House, the home his design partner, William Morris.

Photographed in the British Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: InnoGear Aromatherapy Essential Oil Diffuser

aromatherapy diffuser red and box photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Innovative design can be described as showing people what they can have, rather than merely giving them what they want: and this often translates to expanded functionality. When your apartment has limited tabletop and storage space, it’s especially fun to discover one product that can replace two or three devices you use regularly. Are you fond of infusing your home with comforting scents? And do you love to set a mood with colorful lighting? Perhaps you are also in the market for a small humidifier to offset the drier indoor air during winter months. If you’re feeling any or all of these scenarios, then you will want to check out the Innogear Aromatherapy Essential Oil Diffuser.

Innogear is a pioneering company in the art of aromatherapy, and they offer a range of home diffusers to meet your needs and complement your decor. I received the Model AD309D, seen above, for the purpose of this review. Let’s look at everything this diffuser can do!

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Pink Of Thing The Day: Neon Sign for Pink Jungle Exhibit at the Makeup Museum!

make up museum neon sign photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

If you are intrigued by the history of Makeup, love things that are Pink — and you also crave an out-of-the-house adventure before NYC imposes its next Covid Lockdown (because you know it’s coming) — you can head on over to the newly-opened Makeup Museum (which is a thing that exists) for its debut exhibit entitled Pink Jungle: 1950s Makeup in America. Pink Jungle explores the Makers and Muses of that decade through fascinating and never-before-seen beauty artifacts, and the museum features other makeup-themed exhibits as well. I’ve already booked my visit and will be posting on that very Pink experience in the upcoming weeks!

The Makeup Museum: Pink Jungle is Located at 94 Gansevoort Street, Accross from the Whitney Museum in NYC’s Meatpacking District. Visit This Link For More Information, and to Book and Purchase Your Timed-Entry Tickets. General Admission is $36 but You Can Get a 20% Discount By Entering the Promo Code “NYC” at Check Out.

Eye On Design: Chinese-Inspired Fretwork Candlestands

pair of fretted candle stands 2 photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Chinese fretwork first appeared in Britain in the early eighteenth century on garden fences, but it was not until midcentury that the vogue for fretwork on furniture erupted.

top fret detail photo by gail worley

Here, the three-dimensional angular pattern seems to float in midair to support a small, six-sided tray. The exact design for these candelstands comes from the first edition (1754) of Thomas Chippendale’s Gentlemen and Cabinet-Maker’s Director.

center fret detail photo by gail worley

This Pair of Mahogany Candlestands (Circa 1755 – 60) Was Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

pair of fretted candle stands photo by gail worley

Eye On Design: Gilded Wooden Bench by Thomas Hope

gilded wooden bench by thomas hope photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

A member of a wealthy banking family and sophisticated patron of the arts, Thomas Hope (17391861) set out to influence and improve contemporary taste through the publication of his own collection in Household Furniture and Interior Decoration (1807).

gilded wooden bench by thomas hope installation view photo by gail worleyInstallation View

Following interest in ancient Rome and Greece, attention turned to Egypt as a major source of inspiration for furniture and interior design. This ‘Egyptian” bench shows influence of Hope’s archeological taste and may have been part of the furnishings of his country house The Deepdene, Dorking, Surrey (outside London). It was possibly sold in the Christie’s sale of the Hope heirlooms held at Deepdene over six consecutive days in September of 1917. Lot 1044, sold on September 17th, consisted of: “a carved 4ft. 4in. gilt Egyptian pattern settee with scroll ends, on claw feet, and squab seat upholstered in gold satin damask.”

gilded wooden bench by thomas hope photo by gail worley

While several surviving pieces of furniture can be attached to the detailed line drawings, Hope never remarked on the fabrics to be used. The present wool covers are based on fiber fragments from this bench and on original textile remains from a settee also designed by Hope, which is now at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Pink Thing Of The Day: Pink Tent for Outdoor Dining

pink tent photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Outdoor dining during the Covid 19 pandemic has really saved New York City, not only economically but morale-wise. I love how the little temporary dining areas that restaurants have built curbside make it seem like there’s street fair going on all the time! This Pink Tent and Picket Fence was spotted on Bleecker Street in the West Village.

Eye On Design: Red Bakelite Bead Necklace

red bakelite bead necklace photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

This Red Bead Necklace was crafted from Bakelite (beads and chain links) cellulose acetate, with a metal clasp, and attributed to an unknown American designer. In the twentieth century, plastic manufacturing transformed the American jewelry industry and allowed for the production of fashionable yet affordable pieces. This chain link and cube necklace represents a style that was especially popular during the Depression era and the early 1940s.

red bakelite bead necklace photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Pink Thing of the Day: Pink Mannequin Hand Jewelry Display

pink mannequin hand photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

I was at a flea market downtown when I became enchanted by this Hot Pink, Lucite Mannequin Hand that was being used as a display for rings by a fun jewelry vendor. Luckily, the vendor (IG @dollybabyofficial) let me remove the rings so that I could photograph the hand for the blog — what a sweetheart.

pink mannequin hand photo by gail worley

You can buy one of these hands in a less-vibrant pink color for about $13 at This Link.

pink mannequin hand photo by gail worley

OK!