Archives

Eye On Design: Maquette 259 Seating By Faye Toogood

maquette 259 faye toogood photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

British designer Faye Toogood believes that, whatever your domain of design expertise, the materials you can get your hands on are essential, “because you are always looking for a new way to interpret your designs and to explain your story.” This approach also pertains to her recent venture from designing signature interior spaces and environments (for high-profile clients), to furniture design.

maquette 259 faye toogood photo by gail worley

Part of the exhibit What Would Have Been on view at Freidman Benda, her Maquette 259 seating (2020)  realized in a rusty-peach-painted canvas over upholstery foam aligns with this aesthetic. Toogood’s products are designed with “honesty to the rawness and irregularity of the chosen material,” and are sculptural in form. Like her interior spaces, her furniture is considerate of both the two-dimensional design as well as three-dimensional space.

maquette 259 faye toogood photo by gail worley

I love how it looks like a group of boulders just rolled together! Maquette 259 was manufactured in an limited edition of 8 pieces. Contact Friedman Benda Gallery in NYC for purchase information.

Eye On Design: Red Chiffon and Organza Gown By Brandon Maxwell

brandon maxwell red gown photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

New York’s Museum of Natural History always has one or two special exhibits that require purchase of an extra ticket above the standard price of admission, but that’s because they are worth it. One of the museum’s current special exhibits is called The Nature of Color, and it is just fantastic. The exhibit is immersive and contains many different galleries and rooms. For example, the Red Room highlights how the color red can mean status, power, and fertility while simultaneously representing sports teams, political parties, and religions.  The centerpiece of this room is a flowing Red Silk Chiffon and Organza Gown created especially for the The Nature of Color by fashion designer Brandon Maxwell.

red gown by brandon maxwell photo by gail worley

Post Continues With More Photos, After The Jump!

Continue reading

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Bunny Storage Ottoman

pink bunny storage bin photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

I originally took this photo of a giant paper mache (guessing) Pink Bunny Storage Ottoman (guessing again) at a NY Now gift show in August of 2019. I found it in my photo archives while digging around for a pink thing to post this week. How fortunate.

pink bunny storage bin photo by gail worley

You can see it is rather big, so it would probably be a great addition to a child’s bedroom or playroom, as the back has a removable “lid” and I am sure you could store lots of toys and kid’s crap (or even linen) inside it.  It’s pretty cute, definitely unique and also quite practical. Although I neglected to note the vendor, I did a search for “paper mache animal heads” and found this site, where I immediately recognized the Rainbow Striped Cow Head in the background.  I have no idea if that is the correct vendor, but if you want to have a hand at doing some research Googling on your own, please leave any information in the comments.

Eye On Design: Washington Skeleton Side Chair By David Adjaye

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

The Metropolitan Museum of Art does not often invite visitors to sit directly on the art, but they have made an exception for these Washington Skeleton Side Chairs (2013), designed by Ghanaian-British architect David Adjaye, which can be found in the gallery where the 2020 Holiday Tree is on display.

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley

These delicately balanced, precisely engineered chairs emerged from the design process for the façade of the National Museum of African-American History and Culture, which opened in Washington DC in 2016.  David Adjaye developed an intricate lattice form that was an investigation of the geometry, materiality, light and shadow.

washington skeleton side chair detail photo by gail worley

Both functional in its shading role, and poetic in its abstract visual qualities, this screen borrowed from African design patterns but also paid homage to the history of enslaved blacksmiths and their ironwork for ornamental gates in southern cities such as New Orleans and Charleston.

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley

Utilizing the smaller scale of furniture as an agile testing ground for these architectural ideas, Adjaye produced what he describes as a “narrative about skin, form and structure.“ Here, he shapes the skeletal, ribbed surfaces to mimic the form of a seated person, resulting in a cantilevered, ergonomic silhouette that almost disappears when in use. Made of die-cast aluminum, then powder coated and copper plated, the chairs are manufactured by Knoll International.

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley

Eye On Design: Melting Thonet Chair By OrtaMiklos

melting thonet chair photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail Worley

The classic Thonet Chair design gets a super artsy, post-modern treatment with Melting Thonet, from European design firm OrtaMiklos (which includes partners Leo Orta and Victor Miklos Andersen).

melting thonet chair photo by gail worley

Generally informed by natural habitats and processes, the creative duo’s experimental approach activates their design works from the existing norms. Here, Michael Thonet’s innovative chair frame — created by bending wood with hot steam and forming it into curved, graceful shapes — is fabricated from a powder-coated steel, to create a frame that exaggerates the original’s bends and twists into an entirely different domain.

melting thonet chair photo by gail worley

Photographed at Friedman Benda Gallery in Chelsea (Contact for Pricing) as part of the Recent Exhibit, What Would Have Been.

melting thonet chair photo by gail worley

Eye On Design: Grotto Mirror By Chris Schanck

grotto mirror photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

The absence of virtually all design shows for the year 2020 (Salon Art + Design, Architectural Digest Home Show, ICFF, and on and on) — which was probably my least favorite Covid cancelation — serves as the inspiration for Friedman Benda’s latest exhibit: What Would Have Been, which I visited a few weeks ago to get my design-fix on! The exhibition gives fans access to design that lost its intended platform; works shown briefly before museum doors closed or failed to open at all. A favorite piece in the gallery (and not just because it’s pink) was Chris Schank’s Grotto Mirror — which may look familiar to some readers.

grotto mirror by chris schanck detail photo by gail worley

The Grotto Mirror is part of Schanck’s Unhomely collection, which employs his Alufoil method of sculpting industrial and discarded materials, covering them in aluminum foil and then sealing each with resin.

grotto mirror by chris schanck installation view photo by gail worley
Grotto Mirror Installation View

Each mirror is a unique piece and would surely be the center of attention in any room!

Eye On Design: Octopus Chatelaine

octopus chatelaine photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

With its eight limbs, the octopus was an ingenious choice for a Chatelaine; a belt hook that carried small household items from its chains. Surviving records suggest that Gorham Manufacturing Company made two Octopus Chatelaines (this one is circa 1887).

octopus chatelaine detail photo by gail worley
Detail View

At least one of these devices was equipped by the factory with its attachments, including scissors, a knife, a vinaigrette (small decorative box), a tablet, a pin cushion, and a needle case. The back plate is marked with the Gorham trademark and stamped with the date letter for 1887. The Octopus and its chains are sterling silver and the eyes are surprisingly not polished garnets, but red glass.

octopus chatelaine installation view photo by gal worley
Octopus Chatelaine Installation View

Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Holiday Face Masks From Pomchies!

pomchies pom mask assortment photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

The Holiday Season is upon us and, as predicted, we’re still wearing face masks to keep ourselves and others safe from the spread of the Covid-19 virus. Masks are now a part of everyday life, so it makes sense that consumer mask design continuously evolves to create products that are more comfortable, effective, and — very important — stylish. Previously here on The ‘Gig, we reviewed a line of fashion and lifestyle accessories from Pomchies, a certified woman-owned company with an interesting back-story.

pomchies holiday hair scrunchies photo by gail
Pomchies Hair Scrunchies 3-Pack in Holiday Colors

Heather Logan Clark created Pomchies in 2002 out of a desire to utilize swimsuit material remnants from her previous swimwear company. All Pomchies products are created using the highest quality swimwear fabric that is durable, waterproof, washable, reasonably priced and also eco-friendly. Earlier in 2020, Pomchies launched its Pom Mask line in quick response to the need for comfortable, breathable facial masks at the onset of Covid-19, and the company is now celebrating the sale of two million masks in just seven months!

pom masks holly berry duo photo by gail worley
Pomchies Pom Mask 2-Pack in Seasonal Holly Berry Print and Coordinating Gold Fabric

Thanks to popular demand for these easy-wearing masks, Pomchies has released a line of fun and cheerful seasonal holiday masks for all ages. Worleygig received a few sets of these masks for review on the blog and we are loving them!

Post Continues After The Jump!

Continue reading

Ceramic Cabbage Teapot

ceramic cabbage teapot photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

How did an ancient Asian tradition become something quintessentially British? The fashion for Tea drinking in Great Britain started at court in the later seventeenth century and spread among the aristocracy. Tea remained a heavily taxed luxury until a century later, 1n 1784, when tea duties were slashed from 119 to 12.5 percent, making it affordable to the general public.

In the eighteenth century, the rise of the East India Company — founded to trade with India, Southeast Asia, and China — led to a British monopoly on tea distribution. This global grip established the nation’s mercantile empire, critically dependent on colonial occupation and the movement of slaves. In 1771, American colonists famously protested Britain’s commercial control, dumping imported tea into Boston Harbor during the Boston Tea Party.

ceramic cabbage teapot photo by gail worley

Ambitious British pottery manufacturers and retailers leveraged tea’s popularity to their advantage, cultivating an enormous national ceramics industry. Vastly expanded production yielded new wares, materials and consumers. Profit margins on ceramics were slim, so quality mattered, as did efficiency. Resources and skills were often shared, as innovative makers sprung up and sometimes quickly failed. These developments signaled a shift — creative and economic — toward mass manufacture in a remarkably nimble market, generating a booming export industry for Britain as a result

Photographed in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Interior Design Platform Modsy Reveals the Top Style Trends of 2020

casual modern dining room in blue
Casual Modern Dining Space (All Images Courtesy of Modsy)

A few weeks into Manhattan’s Covid lockdown it became clear that I would be working from home for the long haul, so I created a small budget to upgrade my home office with a few new items. A new task chair, a small colorful rug, and a set of strategically-measured storage cubes helped to create a pleasant and comfortable workplace within my apartment, while optimizing the functionality in the 50-square foot room. Now that our homes are often serving as offices, and even classrooms, you might also be looking for design ideas for the way we live right now. With that in mind, Modsy, an online interior design platform, has just released its 2021 Trend Report, which is brimming with quarantine-inspired interior design trends, emerging style predictions for next year, product sales comparison insights, and survey data from thousands of people across the U.S.

elegant modern living room
Livingroom: Elegance Meets Modern Design

Let’s get inspired with a closer look at some of their findings!

Post Continues, With More Design Ideas, After The Jump!

Continue reading