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Modern Art Monday Presents: Helen Frankenthaler, Orange Mood

Helen Frankenthaler Orange Mood
Photos By Gail

In Orange Mood (1966), Helen Frankenthaler (19282011) thinned acrylic paint to the consistency of watercolor in order to create larger, curving expanses of color through which the weave of the canvas remains visible. Like Jackson Pollack, she placed her canvas directly on the floor and poured paint from above, largely without the aid of a brush. Frankenthaler used color as her painterly language, but she never entirely abandoned representation. Although the references can be subtle, her paintings consistently evoke nature. The undulating forms in Orange Mood relate to a simplified landscape, with zones of color recalling different emotional states. Hue and shape convey place and feeling. “I think of my pictures as explosive landscapes, worlds and distances, held on a flat surface,” Frankenthaler once stated.

Helen Frankenthaler Orange Mood
Installation View

Photographed as Part of The Exhibit Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s, On View Through August 2019 at the Whitney Museum in NYC.

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Pink Think of The Day: Pink Metallic Mesh Dress

Pink Metallic Mesh Dress
Photos By Gail

I saw this fabulous Pink Metallic Mesh Dress in a store on Greene Street in SoHo when I was party-hopping during the Open Showrooms evening that closes out the two-week long NYCxDesign event.

Pink Metallic Mesh Dress Detail

Here’s a detail shot of the mesh that I managed to get, even though at this point I was already too tipsy to remember to note the name of the store I was in. Oops.

Pink Metallic Mesh Dress

The camera roll on my phone tells me that pictures of the dress were taken at 31 1/2 Greene Street, but I looked up that address and I am pretty sure it was south of that exact location. It sure is a great-looking dress. I would wear it.

Rat Boi Mural By Sheryo and The Yok

Rat Boi By Sheryo and The Yok
Photos By Gail

This fun mural features an urban rodent character called Rat Boi, and it is a collaboration from street artists Sheryo and The Yok. The mural went up on Allen Street (as part of The New Allen project) in October of 2017.

Rat Boi By Sheryo and The Yok

Eye On Design: Orbital Floor Lamp By Ferruccio Laviani for Foscarini


All Photos By Gail

Every Spring, NYCxDesign runs for two weeks leading up to the ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair), but the Saturday evening prior to the kick off of ICFF is a festive night of open showrooms down in SoHo. Anyone who’s been to Open Showrooms knows that it means one thing; parties, and one of the best parties is hosted by Italian lighting designers Foscarini, which is where I like to start my evening. This year, I was completely smitten by Foscarini’s Orbital Floor Lamp, by architect and designer Ferruccio Laviani. The Orbital lamp pairs mid-century modern shapes with soft illumination to create a playful lamp for bold, contemporary interiors.

Orbital Floor Lamp Installation View

The Orbital Floor Lamp, a 1992 design by Laviani, features five glass shapes with large screw details. The glass shapes are individually backlit. Constructed of polished metal and silk screen-printed glass, the Orbital makes a timeless statement. Shown here in a multicolored lacquered finish, it is also available in white.

Orbital Floor Lamp

The Orbital Floor Lamp has a price point of $2,026.00 and is available online through a variety of outlets, or at any Foscarini Store globally.

Orbital Floor Lamp Detail

Curtis Kulig Love Mural in Soho

Love Mural
Photos By Gail

Artist Curtis Kulig’s popular Love Me campaign can be found on everything from Tote Bags and Baseball Caps to Jewelry and Nike sneakers. But sometimes you just see it out on the street, where it originated.

This minimalist mural, which just says Love twice in black and again in pink paint, was spotted while I was headed uptown on Sixth Avenue, somewhere between Dominick and Spring Street in SoHo, NYC.

Love Mural

Worleygig.com Turns Sweet Sixteen!

Worleygig Birthday Meme
Worleygig Illo By Dean Haspiel

Hey, Guess What? Today, June 10th, 2019, marks Sixteen sweet years of The Worley Gig existing in the Blogoverse! While thousands of other websites have come and gone in that considerable span of years, The Gig is still surviving and thriving — bringing you the best of Art and Design, plus Food, Pop Culture and Lifestyle posts for what is truly a Blog of Neat Things. Thanks for your continued readership!

Did you know that you can make sure to never miss a post by following Worleygig.com on all of the coolest social media platforms? Get set to start clicking:

FaceBook and FaceBook: FaceBook’s Shitty Algorithm Means I Need Two Fan Pages So That People Can Still Tell Me That They Never See My Posts! Fan Page With Daily Posts Is Here ; Archives and Revival Posts Are Here!

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I am only able to write this rad blog because of your love, so if you dig the Worley Gig please Tell Your Friends about us! Thank you!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Ad Reinhardt, Number 22

Ad Reinhardt Number 22
Photos By Gail

Ad Reinhardt (19131967)  studied both Eastern and Western art history at the undergraduate and graduate levels. He deepened his understanding of Buddhism and other Eastern philosophies by attending the lectures of Zen teacher Daisetz Suzuki at Columbia University. Number 22 (1949) shows Reinhardt fusing Eastern and Western traditions by using calligraphic brushwork inspired by Chinese and Japanese calligraphy in a gridded composition influenced by those of de Stijl cofounder Piet Mondrian.

Ad Reinhardt Number 22 Detail
Number 22, Detail

In classical East Asian painting, the fragility of paper wet with ink limits the artist’s ability to rework the composition. The sturdier canvas support and slower-drying oil paints used throughout much of the history of Western painting allows artists to highlight various revision and layering techniques. Although he worked in oil on canvas, Reinhardt chose to restrain himself and not rework his painting’s surface, in keeping with Asian calligraphic traditions. The result is a far more controlled manner of gestural painting than those of the Abstract Expressionists.

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.