Tag Archive | Art Exhibit

Gas Mask Showerhead

Gas Mask Shower Head
Image Source

Holy Mother of God, that’s one scary best showerhead, isn’t it? Sort of Giger-esque if you ask me, but nevertheless clever and extremely functional. I guess one of the scariest things would be having to rip out the shower wall to install it. Originally exhibited at the Art Directors Club’s 2002 art exhibit, Bed, Bath and Bomb Shelter, which featured gas mask-themed utilitarian product designs, the showerhead was designed by Chris Dimino.

Thanks to Modern Urban Living for The Tip!

Hank Willis Thomas What Goes Without Saying at Jack Shainman Gallery

Hank Willis Thomas I Like Dick
All Photos By Gail

Jack Shainman Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of What Goes Without Saying, Hank Willis Thomas’ third solo exhibition with the gallery. The show includes photographs, sculpture, painting and new media, all which delve into the construction of mythologies embedded in popular culture.

Hank Willis Thomas Assorted SignsKnown for his innovative use of advertising, the differences here is the globally ubiquitous language, he builds complex narratives about history, identity and race. This show brings together several facets of Thomas’ practice to explore objects and language, torn from their history, brought to our present, and repurposed to reveal the process of their agency.

Hank Willis Thomas Believe It

The works in What Goes Without Saying draw from a section of Roland Barthes’ book, Mythologies, to explore the ideas of explicit and implicit representations found in objects, gestures and phrases. By separating language from the advertising in which it appears, he effectively deconstructs the relationship between the reader and viewer.

Hank Willis Thomas Smoking Slogans In Thomas’ new carborundum works, part of the Fair Warning series, he takes text from cigarette advertising in magazines from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, retaining the font while abandoning the accompanying visuals. The decontextualized slogans like Stronger Yet Milder, Measurably Long  and Immeasurably Cool come to stand for more than just a cigarette, highlighting the adjectives used to connote power and elegance, often times with a sexual tone.

Hank Willis Thomas I Am The Greatest Button

What Goes Without Saying focuses on subtext, shifting meaning and the complexity of historical actions embedded in visual culture. These ideas are important in the context of the current election and the theater of the campaigns.

Hank Willis Thomas’s What Goes Without Saying will be on Exhibit Through November 17, 2012 at Jack Shainman Gallery, Located at 513 West 20th Street, NYC. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Hank Willis Thomas Goes Without Saying Exhibit Sign

Hank Willis Thomas 3 Signs

Pink Thing of the Day: Pink Cannon Sculpture

Pink Cannon Sculpture
Image Source

Yes, we know what else this lovely pink thing looks like. But this silicone sculpture of a hot pink cannon is part of an exhibit that includes a larger grouping of the identical sculptures (see photo below) from an exhibit at the Ankara Galeri in Turkey. From what we gather courtesy of Google Translate, the exhibit, which took place in late 2011, was called Generation of Defense. Very Nice!

Pink Cannon Sculptures

Ron English Status Factory Pop Up Gallery Opens in Soho!


All Photos By Scott Beale of Laughingsquid.com Except Where Noted. Click on Any Image to Enlarge. (Image Source)

 Although Ron English is one the most prolific and recognizable pop artists in the world, he’s not really a household name to people who, unlike Geoffrey  and me, are not completely obsessed with art, or to anyone who has not seen Morgan Spurlock’s documentary, Supersize Me, for which English did all of the iconic artwork – including a squat, pudgy cheeked Ronald McDonald known as McSupersize. So, here’s a little introduction to Ron from his Wikipedia page, which I am cutting and pasting here for your edification:

Ron English is an American contemporary artist who explores popular brand imageryand advertising. His signature style employs a mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, including comic superhero mythology and totems of art history, to create a visual language of evolution. He is also widely considered a seminal figure in the advancement of street artaway from traditional wild-style lettering and into clever statement and masterful trompe l’oeil based art. He has created illegal murals and billboards that blend stunning visuals with biting political, consumerist and surrealist statements, hijacking public space worldwide for the sake of art since the 1980s.

In a word, Ron English is rad. On Sunday, September 12th I was very lucky to be one of the first in NYC to visit his latest exhibit, Status Factory, and I can tell you it was well worth waiting in the rain for over an hour to get in. Presented by Opera Gallery, Status Factory occupies a three level retail space in Soho, where over 100 works by English have transformed the store into a surreal, pop art Fantasyland.

Offering a stimulating visual treat at every turn, you’ll see dozens of the images that English is known for, including many works inspired by his deep infatuation with Andy Warhol: the Marilyn Monroes with Mickey Mouse breasts, the camouflage Warhol mash-ups and a new series of portraits called Pubescent Artist, featuring a young boy wearing a Warhol fright wig shown in a succession of stoic poses that reveal only very subtly different facial expressions. The Pubescent Artist series was one of my favorite parts of the exhibit.

Photo Courtesy of ArrestedMotion.Com

There’s also a darkened room clogged with neon-painted, glow-in-the-dark sculptures that resembles something straight out of a head shop’s black light poster room. Status Factory also proudly displays one of English’s most recent and topical works, the Abraham Obama portrait, alongside a painting depicting a  tranquil mountain stream beside which a rainbow-striped zebra contemplates bowing its head to take a drink.

 

A few of the larger canvases include several of his reinterpretations of Picasso’s Guernica, which I found to be very clever and thought provoking. And of course, there’s always room for McSupersize himself. There is just so much to see and ponder at the Status Factory that I’d say you could visit a few times and discover something new on each visit.

I’d also like to thank Ron for giving away signed and numbered prints of his Grin image to the first 100 of us who waited in the rain to get in, and for taking extra, personal time to sign additional items for each person visiting the exhibit. He is a very friendly, gracious person. Ron English!

 

Experience the wonderful world of Ron English’s Status Factory while you can at 282 West Broadway (C Train to Canal, then walk a few blocks uptown on West Broadway). Open 12 Noon – 8 PM daily from now until October 30, 2010.


Andy Warhol: The Last Decade at The Brooklyn Museum


It is no secret to anyone who reads this blog that I am all about Andy Warhol. When it comes to matters of the art (pun intended) Geoffrey and I will agree on most things, but we differ slightly in opinion when it comes to Warhol. While he admits to being a fan, Geoffrey has a love/hate relationship with Andy, feeling that he ruined art as much as he saved it by facilitating the “Everyone will be famous for 15 minutes” approach to everyman stardom that has created such reprehensible pieces of shit as The Real Housewives, Big Brother and the Kardashian sisters. I see his point, but I would have to respectfully disagree with his take that Warhol “ruined” art in any way. On the contrary, by being the very first artist to infiltrate fine art with a commercial art approach and accompanying sensibilities, Warhol made art truly accessible to the masses for the first time in history. In this way, he revolutionized Modern Art as we know it. Regardless of his many eccentricities and the commonly held belief that he was somewhat of an asshole in person, Andy Warhol was a maverick pioneer of staggering genius. He is my favorite artist ever in the Universe of all time. Andy Warhol!

Easter Eggs, Photo By Geoffrey Dicker

You can probably imagine then how excited I was to finally have the time to check out Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, which has been up for over a month now over at the Brooklyn Museum. The Last Decade is the first US museum retrospective to examine the later period work of Andy Warhol (who died in 1987). With close to fifty works in the collection, the exhibition reveals a “renewed spirit of experimentation” that Warhol experienced in his final ten years. At this time, Warhol produced more works in series form, and on a vastly larger scale, than at any other point in his forty-year career. With his controversial Oxidations series as well as his Yarn, Rorschach and Camouflage paintings, the visual style of his work progressed along with the introduction of new techniques. Inspired by collaborations with Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francesco Clemente and Keith Haring, Warhol also returned to hand-painted images using a brush.


Camouflage (Reminds Me a Little of This)

The Last Decade is much different from another recent Warhol exhibit I saw back in February of 2009, Warhol Live at San Francisco’s DeYoung Museum which, while comprehensive, was primarily about Warhol’s portraits. With exception of the “Fright Wig” self-portraits (one of which provides the primary image used by the museum for promoting this exhibit) and the Interview Magazine cover portraits, I’d never seen any of these images on exhibit before. And discovering something new about an artist who’s already been dead for over two decades is always fun.

Andy Warhol: The Last Decade at The Brooklyn Museum (in the 1st Floor Robert E. Blum Gallery and the 5th Floor Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing) runs through September 12, 2010. From Manhattan take the 2 or 3 to the Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum stop, and you’re right there.

The Mighty Boosh’s Noel Fielding to Exhibit Original Artwork in London!

Heads Up: American fans of the hilarious and twisted BBC/Adult Swim series, The Mighty Boosh – starring Noel Fielding and Julian Barratt – might want to schedule that long-planned trip to London for sometime between next Monday and the end of the year. That way, you can check out Noel Fielding’s exhibit of his original paintings, starting July 5th at Maison Bertaux patisserie in London. The show is entitled Brian Ferry versus the Jelly Fox, which makes sense when you know that Noel is a huge fan of the former Roxy Music front man (Ferry is referenced in the 2004 Mighty Boosh episode, Hitcher).

According to an interview with Fielding published today in the Guardian UK, the exhibit “will feature a shrine to Ferry, including a large portrait of the Roxy Music singer, as well as a picture of a tree, with Ferry masks hanging off, and another with a headless man on a hill, a Bryan Ferry kite flying high above his neck. The Jelly Fox is part of another convoluted fantasy, a little like The Wizard of Oz, in which three characters go in search of the Jelly Fox.”

I think I will be calling my travel agent shortly!

Noel Fielding’s Bryan Ferry vs The Jelly Fox runs from July 5, 2010 to January 2011 at Maison Bertaux (“London’s oldest and best patisserie”), located at 28 Greek Street, SOHO London, England.


Final Day for John Lennon Art Exhibit in NYC!

It is no secret that The Beatles were the greatest band ever in the universe of all time. For those Beatles and John Lennon fans in or near New York City, Sunday October 12, 2008  is the final day to see a moving and impressive collection of John Lennon’s drawings and song lyrics entitled “Imagine Peace.” Geoffrey and I went yesterday and spent about an hour enjoying the funny, insightful and often provocative collection of over 100 drawings and framed lyrics of songs from both The Beatles’ and Lennon’s solo catalogs. Some of my favorites were colorful sketches John did with his son Sean, like the frog drawing seen above. They also play Beatles songs non-stop over the gallery’s sound system, which makes it an even more enjoyable experience, because you can work in a little dancing! Sadly, the exhibit has a limited run which ends this evening. Do try to make it by if you can. Gallery address info is below.

Exhibit is at Openhouse Gallery, 201 Mulberry St., in SoHo. Hours: Thursday night 5-9; Friday 12-9 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-6p.m. The suggested $2 donation benefits City Meals-On-Wheels.