Tag Archive | David Zwirner Gallery

Modern Art Monday Presents: Jeff Koons, Bluebird Planter

Koons Bluebird Planter
All Photos By Gail

As part of the gallery’s anniversary of 25 Years in business, David Zwirner on 20th Street is currently hosting an exhibit of works by a selection of the major artists it represents. Being a major Jeff Koons fan, my favorite piece in the show is Bluebird Planter: a piece from Koons‘ Banality series (2010 – 2016) created in the artists signature mirror-polished stainless steel, with a transparent color coating, and a space on top of the sculpture for live flowering plants.

Koons Bluebird Planter

The  Banality series consists of a number of large sculptures inspired by porcelain Hummel Figurines. I left a random art fan in this shot so you can see how large the sculpture is.

Koons Bluebird Planter

This sculpture had fake plants in its planter but you can get the idea. It is extremely gorgeous. Breathtaking even.

Koons Bluebird Planter

 

Advertisements

Bridget Riley at David Zwirner Gallery

Bridget Riley Black and White Square
All Photos By Gail

Do you enjoy the fabulous Op Art images of legendary British painter Bridget Riley? I sure do. Bridget Riley is so cool, the retro-pop project Death By Chocolate even wrote a song about her. Fabulous. Bridget is 84 now, but still rocking a paintbrush, and I got to meet her recently at the opening reception for her current exhibit over at David Zwirner. You need to check it out.

Bridget Riley Installation View

This new show is the gallery’s first exhibition with Bridget Riley in New York, her first show in the city since 2007, and the only New York presentation since Bridget Riley: Reconnaissance at the Dia Center for the Arts in 2000 to feature new and older works. The exhibition marks fifty years since Riley’s participation in The Responsive Eye at The Museum of Modern Art, the highly influential group show which led to instant, international recognition for the young British painter. Last year, David Zwirner hosted her inaugural show at the London gallery, which was a major survey of her stripe paintings from 1961 to 2014.

Bridget Riley

One of the most significant living artists, Riley’s work has radically explored the active role of perception in art, using the interrelationship between line and color to convey movement and light within the pictorial field. From the early 1960s, the artist has employed elementary shapes — such as circles, stripes, and curves — to create visual experiences that actively engage the viewer, testing the limits of each element at various stages throughout her career.

Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley Vertical Stripes

Stripes

This exhibition includes paintings and works on paper spanning almost thirty-five years of Riley’s practice. It takes its chronological point of departure in vertical stripe works from the early 1980s featuring her “Egyptian palette” inspired by the artist’s trip to Egypt in late 1979, which unlike previous combinations of color was organized according to plastic (and not rational) principles. These asymmetrical compositions anticipated the ensuing diagonal grid paintings that Riley began in 1986. Featuring rhomboid shapes that break up the picture plane, these in turn became the foundation for her curved paintings in the late 1990s.

Bridget Riley Installation View 2

Vertical, curvilinear shapes prevailed in the past decade and also characterize her wall painting Rajasthan (2012), a composition of intersecting forms in green, gray, orange, and red whose presentation here marks its first display outside of Europe.

Bridget Riley Orange and Green

Bridget Riley Orange Purple and Green

Bridget Riley Yellow Blue and Green

Bridget Riley Black and White Long

The exhibition culminates with Riley’s most recent stripe works as well as a new series of black-and-white paintings that explore concavity and convexity of the line, all shown here for the first time. The return to painting in black and white, which she had abandoned in the mid-1960s in order to explore the properties of color, was directly inspired by Riley’s 1962 painting Tremor, and here appears in the current context of five decades of work.

Signature

Bridget Riley will be on Exhibit Through December 19th, 2015 at David Zwirner Gallery, Located at 525 and 533 West 19th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Bridget Riley Signage

Bridget Riley Framed

Yayoi Kusama’s Give Me Love at David Zwirner

Obliteration Room
Obliteration Room By Yayoi Kusama (All Photos By Gail)

David Zwirner’s 19th Street space is currently hosting Give Me Love, the New York gallery’s second exhibition with our favorite living artist, 86-year-old Yayoi Kusama. On view are new paintings from the celebrated My Eternal Soul series, new polka-dotted pumpkin sculptures, and the artist’s seminal installation The Obliteration Room from 2002. Whether you are a long-time Kusama fan, or even if you are new to her work, Give Me Love is a Must See Exhibit!

Kusama Fan

Yayoi Kusama Fan at Opening Reception!

Kusama Painting

In this show, Kusama continues her recent series of large-format, square My Eternal Soul paintings with a group of canvases conveying extraordinary vitality and passion.

Kusama Painting

With titles such as Fear of Youth Overwhelmed by the Spring Time of Life, I Who Have Taken an Antidepressant, and My Longing, the Unseen Land of Death, the compositions acquire an autobiographic, even confessional dimension.

Kusama Painting

Kusama Painting

The bold brushstrokes and swirly shapes seem to hover between figuration and abstraction; vibrant, animated, and intense, they transcend their medium to introduce their own pictorial logic, at once contemporary and universal.

Pink Eyes

Pink Eyes Detail
Detail from Painting, Above

As such, while they continue Kusama’s innovative exploration of form, subject matter, and space, they also represent a connection to her work from the past six decades.

Kusama Painting

Pumpkin Room

The sculptures on view include new stainless steel pumpkins featuring either painted or perforated dots. Their exaggerated sizes — the tallest being approximately 70 inches (178 cm) high — seem measured after human proportions, and their mirrored surfaces are thus able to contain viewers’ full body reflections.

Me in the Pumpkin

Red Pumpkin

Yellow Pumpkin

While pumpkins have appeared in Kusama’s work since her early art studies in Japan in the 1950s, they gained increasing prominence from the late 1980s onwards. The juxtaposition between the lush organic shape and its shiny, steel materiality here creates a psychedelic impression, but ultimately the bulbous forms emerge as celebratory and animated, absorbing viewers and their surroundings in their own image.

Obliteration Room Line
In Line to Enter the Obliteration Room

Obliteration Room Exterior
Obliteration Room, Exterior

This very whimsical exhibition also marks the United States debut of The Obliteration Room, an all-white, domestic interior that over the course of the show is covered by dots of varying sizes and colors.

Obliteration Room

Obliteration Room

In a departure from earlier iterations of the work, which have involved one or several rooms, the present installation is built like a typical, prefabricated American suburban house.

Obliteration Room

As visitors are handed a set of stickers and step inside, they enter a completely white residential setting where otherwise familiar objects such as a kitchen counter, couch, and bookshelves are all painted the same shade.

Obliteration Room

Gradually transforming the space as a result of the interaction, the accumulation of the bright dots ultimately changes the interior until it is eradicated into a blur of colors. A sense of depth and volume disappears as individual pieces of furniture, floors, and walls blend together.

Obliteration Room

Obliteration Room

Consider that these photos were taken less than two hours after the exhibit opened to he public. Now imagine how it looks right now, or will look at the exhibit’s close on June 13th? Pretty crazy!

Obliteration Room

Give Me Love by Yayoi Kusama will be on Exhibit Through June 13th, 2015 at David Zwirner, Located at 519 & 525 West 19th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Give Me Love Signage

Kusama Painting

Kusama Painting

Michael Riedel’s Powerpoint at David Zwirner Gallery

Michael Riedel Powerpoint
All Photos by Gail

In my own words, I would describe German artist Michael Riedel’s Powerpoint as repetitive, minimalist geometric designs on large canvases, mounted on wallpaper mimicking the same design. As far as how he came up with these specific images, however, and what it all “means,” I admit I couldn’t really get my head around it. Here’s an explanation from the show’s press release:

“Since the late 1990s, Michael Riedel has advanced his own model of a self-sustaining artistic production, continuously using reproductions as a means to “reintroduce the system of art into the art system.”

Michael Riedel Powerpoint

PowerPoint takes its point of departure in the artist’s last solo exhibition at David Zwirner entitled The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog (2011). Where this show reflected digital distribution processes — with Poster Paintings featuring information from websites communicating Riedel’s work as their backgrounds — the present exhibition takes the process a step further, allowing the system to recreate itself once more. It includes new works made by combining two Poster Paintings using an animated feature in PowerPoint, the software program used by the artist when delivering presentations on his work. Riedel has “frozen” the particular transition between two slides, generating a new work that takes place between two existing works. In a further variation of the idea, some Poster Paintings were merged with a blank page. The fact that each new work creates a gap that can be filled again suggests the idea of endless production.”

So, there you go. I couldn’t have said it myself.

Michael Riedel Powerpoint Various

What was also cool about attending this opening reception is the invite itself. Riedel asked the band Woog Riots to create an original song to advertise the exhibition, and this makes the invitation itself a collectible work of art. You can see it in the above photo, bottom right. Below, you will see my signed copy of the invite.

Michael Riedel Invite

You can stream the song at This link. The lyrics explain the “point” of the exhibit and give the location, address, time and date of the opening as well as the duration of the exhibit — and the correct way to pronounce Riedel’s name — in an up-beat, euro-pop dance tune that sounds like a kid’s band version of Kraftwerk with a girl singer. Very fun!

Michael Riedel Powerpoint Turntable

Geoffrey and I arrived at the gallery about 15 minutes early and so were able to get all of our pictures with no people in them, meet Riedel and get his autograph on our invitations and also enjoy some very cool ’60s-sounding music playing on a turntable that was set up on the floor near the corner of the rear gallery.

Up Againt It The Times

I think this album is what was playing, but I can’t be sure. It says, Up Against It: Joe Orton’s Original Screenplay for The Beatles. Original Soundtrack by The Times.” I want to find this album and own it.

Michael Riedel Powerpoint Black

Michael Riedel Powerpoint Red

Michael Riedel’s Powerpoint will be on Exhibit at David Zwirner Gallery, 533 West 19th Street, NYC, through March 23, 2013, so you still have lots of time to see it. Gallery Hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM.

Michael Riedel Powerpoint Purple
Michael Riedel Powerpoint Green and Purple