Tag Archive | The Brooklyn Museum

More Photos From The John Paul Gaultier Exhibit

Portrait of JP Gaultier
Photo/Portrait of Jean Paul Gaultier (All Photos By Gail)

As promised, here’s another stash of awesome photos from The Brooklyn Museum’s Jean Paul Gaultier Fashion Retrospective. These creations can be found in The Boudoir Gallery.

For background (the how and why, so to speak) information on the exhibit, please visit This Link.

Boudoir Pink Satin Outfit and Teddy Bear

Note the prototype Cone Bra-Wearing Teddy Bear, which set a precedent for many Cone Bras to Come!

Boudoir Pink Satin Outfit Detail

Detail from the photo above. This was one of my favorite outfits in the entire exhibit.

Boudoir Outfit with Umbrella and TV

Costumes Sketches for Madonna

It can be argued that Gaultier virtually created Madonna’s Blonde Ambition tour persona with his elaborate corsets, bustiers and fetish-wear designed for the superstar and her dancers. Certainly there is ample evidence to that end on display here, in The Boudoir.

Costume Sketch for Madonna and Dancers
Let the Homoeroticism Begin!

Madonna Iconic Gold Corset
Madonna in Her Gaultier-Designed Iconic Gold Corset

Boudoir Gallery Champagne Satin Walls

The walls of this gallery are covered floor to ceiling in quilted, champagne colored satin. Very nice!

Boudoir Gallery with Crowd

This is what the gallery looks like with people in it.

Gaultier Colognes

Various scents of JPG Cologne in the now Iconic Bottle!

Outfits for Beth Ditto

Outfits designed for Beth Ditto of The Gossip!

Black Waistcoat and White Lace Gown

That White Lace dress is nice!

If these pics, and the ones posted previously, aren’t enough to inspire you to get your ass to the Brooklyn Museum for this exhibit, I have another set or two which will run probably next week. For logistical information (the when, where and how much) on the Jean Paul Gaultier exhibit, please visit This Link.

Advertisements

Must See Art – Keith Haring: 1978–1982 at The Brooklyn Museum

Keith Haring Exhibit Card

Image Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum. All Additional Photos By Me.

Spring has sprung, and the cherry blossoms are in serious bloom out front of the Brooklyn Museum, where from now until July 8th you can see an exciting retrospective on the early career of the late Keith Haring. Here in downtown NYC, especially, Haring’s humorous yet socially provocative, instantly recognizable pop art images are enduring and almost ubiquitous even 22 years after his death. I’ve always been attracted to Keith’s clever line drawings and the sense of humor inherent in his work, but it wasn’t until I watched Christina Clausen’s 2008 documentary The Universe of Keith Haring (rent it on Netflix) that I realized what a true visionary and genius he was. It seems that the great ones always leave us too soon.

Keith Haring Long Wall Mural

According to the official press release, Keith Haring: 1978–1982 is the first large-scale exhibition to explore the early career of one of the best-known American artists of the twentieth century. Tracing the development of Haring’s extraordinary visual vocabulary, the exhibition includes 155 works on paper, numerous experimental videos, and over 150 archival objects, including rarely seen sketchbooks, journals, exhibition flyers, posters, subway drawings, and documentary photographs.

Keith Haring Exhibit Crowd

The exhibition chronicles the period in Haring’s career from his arrival in New York City through the years when he started his studio practice and began making public and political art on the city streets. Immersing himself in New York’s downtown culture, he quickly became a fixture on the artistic scene, befriending other artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Kenny Scharf, as well as many of the most innovative cultural figures of the period. The critical role that these relationships played in Haring’s development as a public artist and facilitator of group exhibitions and performances is also explored.

Keith Haring Subway Art with Pia Zadora

Pieces on view include a number of very early works never before seen in public; seven video pieces, including Painting Myself into a Corner (his first video piece) and Tribute to Gloria Vanderbilt; and collages created from cut-up fragments of his own writing, history textbooks, and newspapers. Keith Haring died from AIDS related complications in February of 1990 at the age of 31, but his art and message will live on forever. For more information on the Keith Haring exhibit visit the Brooklyn Museum’s website at this link.

Keith Haring Where Meat Comes From

Keith Haring: 1978–1982 will be on Exhibit through July 8, 2012 in the Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 5th Floor of The Brooklyn Museum, located at 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, which is easily accessible from Manhattan via the 2 or 3 Trains to the Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum exit. So Easy! Hours are Wednesday: 11:00 AM – 6:00 PM, Thursday: 11:00 AM –10:00 PM and Friday–Sunday: 11:00 AM – 6:00 PM. Phone: (718)638-5000 for Additional Information.

Keith Haring Flyer Wall

See Additional Photos from this exhibit at According2g.com and after the jump!

Continue reading

Andy Warhol: The Last Decade at The Brooklyn Museum


It is no secret to anyone who reads this blog that I am all about Andy Warhol. When it comes to matters of the art (pun intended) Geoffrey and I will agree on most things, but we differ slightly in opinion when it comes to Warhol. While he admits to being a fan, Geoffrey has a love/hate relationship with Andy, feeling that he ruined art as much as he saved it by facilitating the “Everyone will be famous for 15 minutes” approach to everyman stardom that has created such reprehensible pieces of shit as The Real Housewives, Big Brother and the Kardashian sisters. I see his point, but I would have to respectfully disagree with his take that Warhol “ruined” art in any way. On the contrary, by being the very first artist to infiltrate fine art with a commercial art approach and accompanying sensibilities, Warhol made art truly accessible to the masses for the first time in history. In this way, he revolutionized Modern Art as we know it. Regardless of his many eccentricities and the commonly held belief that he was somewhat of an asshole in person, Andy Warhol was a maverick pioneer of staggering genius. He is my favorite artist ever in the Universe of all time. Andy Warhol!

Easter Eggs, Photo By Geoffrey Dicker

You can probably imagine then how excited I was to finally have the time to check out Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, which has been up for over a month now over at the Brooklyn Museum. The Last Decade is the first US museum retrospective to examine the later period work of Andy Warhol (who died in 1987). With close to fifty works in the collection, the exhibition reveals a “renewed spirit of experimentation” that Warhol experienced in his final ten years. At this time, Warhol produced more works in series form, and on a vastly larger scale, than at any other point in his forty-year career. With his controversial Oxidations series as well as his Yarn, Rorschach and Camouflage paintings, the visual style of his work progressed along with the introduction of new techniques. Inspired by collaborations with Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francesco Clemente and Keith Haring, Warhol also returned to hand-painted images using a brush.


Camouflage (Reminds Me a Little of This)

The Last Decade is much different from another recent Warhol exhibit I saw back in February of 2009, Warhol Live at San Francisco’s DeYoung Museum which, while comprehensive, was primarily about Warhol’s portraits. With exception of the “Fright Wig” self-portraits (one of which provides the primary image used by the museum for promoting this exhibit) and the Interview Magazine cover portraits, I’d never seen any of these images on exhibit before. And discovering something new about an artist who’s already been dead for over two decades is always fun.

Andy Warhol: The Last Decade at The Brooklyn Museum (in the 1st Floor Robert E. Blum Gallery and the 5th Floor Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing) runs through September 12, 2010. From Manhattan take the 2 or 3 to the Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum stop, and you’re right there.