Tag Archive | The Cloisters

Eye On Design: Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne

Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne
All Photos By Gail

The Spring 2018 exhibition from The Met’s Costume Institute, entitled Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, ended its five-month run on October 8th, and broke all kinds attendance records, surpassing even that of 2011’s Alexander McQueen exhibition.  Over these past few months, I’ve enjoyed bringing you design posts featuring some of my favorite highlights from the exhibit, seen at both its Met Fifth Avenue and Met Cloisters locations. I still have many photos that have not been publicshed, so I may be bringing you #MetHeavenlyBodies designs well into 2019! You’re welcome!

Wedding Ensemble Right Side

One of my vary favorite outfits, photographed over at the Met Cloisters is this Thom Browne-designed Wedding Ensemble with its cloud-like skirt, from his Spring/Summer 2018 collection. Created from a variety of materials including white mink, white silk organza, ribbons of white nylon tulle, embroidered white silk thread, gold bullion, pearls, crystals, clear glass, and mother-of-pearl, it was quite the show stopper!

Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne

It’s no accident that this piece was installed near the museum’s famous Unicorn tapestries, as you can see in the above photo where a Unicorn Head and Horn are formed with twisted tulle and gold bullion on the garment’s bodice.

Wedding Ensemble
Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne with Unicorn Tapestries In Background

Wedding Ensemble Rear View Detail

And on the back, yes, there they are, the subtle stab wounds that we see in the tapestries.

Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne

What may be even more striking than this ornate dress is the mannequin’s vibrant red hairpiece by celebrated hair stylist and wig-maker Shay Ashual, who designed all of the wigs for the exhibit. To quote Catherine Addington for Weekly Standard Dot Com, “In Ashual’s most stunning work, red-violet streaks matted to the face of the mannequin wearing a Thom Browne wedding dress conjure blood and beauty at once. Set against The Unicorn in Captivity, a tapestry that has often been interpreted as Passion symbolism, the hairpiece turns an otherwise enigmatic ensemble into the heavenly wedding garment of a martyr.”

Wedding Ensemble

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Eye On Design: Crown of Thorns Headpiece By Alexander McQueen

Crown of Thorns Headpiece
All Photos By Gail

Alexander McQueen collaborated with the jeweler Shaun Leane to create this silver Crown of Thorns Headpiece (1996 – 97) formed from three intertwined briars. The piece was featured in McQueen’s Autumn/Winter 1996-97 collection entitled Dante, after the medieval Italian poet whose Divine Comedy portrayed an allegorical vision of the afterlife.

Crown of Thorns Headpiece

Photographed at the Cloisters as Part of the Exhibit, Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, On View Through October 8th, 2018 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (at both the Fifth Avenue and Cloisters Locations) in NYC.

Crown of Thorns Headpiece

Note: As of 11/5/18 This Piece is Now On Exhibit at The Met Fifth Avenue as Part of the Exhibit Jewelry: The Body Transformed

Crown Of Thorns

Eye On Design: Undercover Spring/Summer Ensembles Featuring Hieronymus Bosch Textiles

Undecover Mini Dress Detail
All Photos By Gail

For designer Jun Takahashi’s Undercover 2015 spring/summer ready-to-wear collection, he presented a series of dresses in textiles printed with phantasmagoric iconography from Hieronymus Bosch’s triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights, collaged in a manner that heightens the painting’s proto-Surrealism.

Undecover Mini Dress

Undecover Mini Dress Full

Arguably Bosch’s most complex and enigmatic creation, the triptych’s overall theme is the fate of humanity — more specifically, the concept of sin, which starts in the Garden of Eden on the left panel and ends in Hell, on the right.

Bosch Separates

The collection also features matching footwear in the Bosch textile, and jewelry/accessories inspired by flowers in the background of the famous painting.

Giraffe Print Blouse Detail

Bosch Shoes Front

Wedge Shoes, Detail

Bosch Shoes Back

Bosch Dress Back

Photographed at the Cloisters as Part of the Exhibit, Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, On View Through October 8th, 2018 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (at both the Fifth Avenue and Cloisters Locations) in NYC.

Bosch Dress Front

Armors Outdoor Art Installation On The Cloisters Lawn!

Armors Duo
All Photos By Gail

A couple of weeks ago, Geoffrey and I made the upper Mnahattan pilgrimage to The Cloisters to see the second half of The Met’s Heavenly Bodies costume exhibit, and we were not disappointed. A bonus of the trip is that, as we rode the bus from the subway up to the top of the hill – because who wants to walk in this heat? – I noticed what looked like life-size Knights in Armor scattered about the lawn, and decided that we must check that shit out on our way back to the train. And check it out we did.

Armors Wide Shot

It turns out that the Armored Knights, and their alien-looking, silvery Nude companions, part of an installation, Armors, which was created by Icelandic sculptor Steinunn Thorarinsdottir. Back home, the artist is known for the androgynous figures she’s placed at iconic landmarks across the globe, including in Reykjavík outside Hallgrímskirkja church and, back in 2011 at NYC’s Hammarskjöld Plaza near Second Avenue.

Armors

Armors is made up of three pairs of figures, each featuring a Knight — whose armor replicates a piece of 16th century armor found in gallery 317 at The Met – who is facing or interacting with one of Thorarinsdottir’s nude figures. The Knights were 3D scanned and then manufactured out of aluminum. Thorarinsdottir modeled each nude figure as a direct response to each distinct suit of armor, and all six were then brought to the Cloisters Lawn.

Armors Nude Figure

Knight and Cosplay Child
Knight Photographed with Random Cosplaying Child

In a statement about the work, Thorarinsdottir offers that, “Ancient armors are in themselves sculptural forms. They were developed for war but they give a sharp insight into the psyche of man. I wanted to merge medieval armors and ageless, androgynous figures in a way that would speak to the human condition today and in the past.”

Knight Close Up

Armors Distance Shot

Armors was created in collaboration with NYC Parks’ Art in the Parks program, and can be found in Fort Tryon Park, on the great lawn just downhill from the Cloisters. Get your medieval selfies through September 13th, 2018.

Knight and Nude Duo