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Rasta Banana

Rasta Banana
All Photos By Gail

I saw this deadlock-sporting Rasta Banana hanging merrily in this tree in a Community Garden on Avenue C. I like his hat.

Rasta Banana

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Eye On Design: Charlotte Perriand’s Revolving Armchair Circa 1928

Revolving Armchair
All Photos By Gail

In this design, partly inspired by an office swivel chair, Charlotte Perriand softened the rigidity of the tubular, chrome-plated frame with a stuff cushion resting on coil springs. Because the frame and the upholstery required considerable handwork, the chair was relatively expensive and manufactured in limited numbers. Perriand used such chairs in her own Paris apartment.

Revolving Armchair
This View More Closely Shows the Chair’s Curved Back Detailing

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Photos From Paris Refashioned: 1957-1968 at The Museum at FIT

Installation View with Ungaro Coat
All Photos By Gail

For reasons that take too long to talk about, I’m late to the game with my post on the exhibit Paris Refashioned: 1957-1968, which closed on April 15th, 2017. But why waste a collection of lovely photos when I could still post them here, in hope that they will entice you to attend the museum’s next exhibit, while you learn more about the history of French fashion!

Installation View
Installation View

I was fortunate to visit the exhibit one frigid Saturday afternoon in February, when there were very few other attendees and the feelings of nostalgia were great, as it reminded me of shopping with my mother when I was a little girl back in the 1960s.

Installation View with Pantsuits
Installation View with Pantsuits

Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968 highlighted one of the most groundbreaking time periods in fashion history. While many books and exhibitions about this era position London as the center of innovative, youth-oriented design, this limited perspective overlooks the significant role that Paris continued to play in the fashion industry. Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968 examined the combined influence of French haute couture, ready-to-wear, and popular culture during this era, with particular emphasis on how fashion was perceived and promoted by the American fashion press. All objects on view were selected from The Museum at FIT’s permanent collection of more than 50,000 objects.

Please enjoy some of our favorite designs from the show!

Evening Suit By Coco Chanel
Evening Suit By Coco Chanel in Gold Silk Satin Brocade, 1960

Christian Dior Hostess Gown
Christian Dior Ready-to-Wear Hostess Gown, Printed Ivory Silk Satin, 1957

Installation View with Red Suit

Emanuel Ungaro Couture Dress
Emanuel Ungaro Couture Dress, Red Double-knit Wool, Polyurethane and PVC, 1967

Emanuel Ungaro Couture Coat
Left Foreground: Emanuel Ungaro Couture Coat. Blue and Grey Printed Wool Fabric By Sonia Knapp, 1968

Jules Lanvin Couture Evening Ensemble
Far Left: Jeanne Lanvin (aka Jules-Francois Crahay)  Couture Evening Ensemble Dress and Hood in Fuschia Silk Chifon and Rhinestones, 1964-65

Pierre Cardin Coat and Pinafore Dress
Left: Pierre Cardin Ready-to-Wear Coat and Pinafore Dress and Belt in Burgundy Leather, 1967

Arlette Nastat Ready-to-Wear Dress

Arlette Nastat Ready-to-Wear Dress Detail
Arlette Nastat Ready-to-Wear Dress in Black and Pink Linen, 1966

Exhibit Signage

Look for more individual pieces from the exhibit to be featured in Wednesday’s weekly Eye On Design column in upcoming weeks!

Andres Courreges Couture Dress 1968
André Courrèges Couture Dress in Black Chiffon, Tan Silk and Black Vinyl, 1968

Modern Art Monday Presents: Count No Count by Ross Bleckner

Count No Count by Ross Bleckner
Photo By Gail

Ross Bleckner’s Count No Count (1989) is one of a series of memento mori paintings that the artist began to make in the mid-1980s. The suggestion of flickering lights in the work serves as a reminder to viewers of their own mortality, and for Bleckner — an AIDS activist — of the many lives lost to the AIDS epidemic. Bleckner engages both the formal and metaphorical qualities of light, yielding a work that shifts between abstraction and symbolic representation. To achieve the appearance of light within a darkened void, the artist blended wax into oil paint, creating a luminous surface that conveys what he describes as “this almost continual light that comes from inside.”

Photographed as Part of Fast Forward: Painting From The 1980s at the Whitney Museum of Americana Art, on Exhibit Through May 14th, 2017.

Video Clip of The Week: Greta Van Fleet, “Highway Tune”


Do you like Led Zeppelin? I sure do. The Beatles, Led Zeppelin and Queen are pretty much where it’s all at in the Holy Trinity of Rock & Roll as far as I’m concerned. And while there is always room for originality, even Kevin Parker of Tame Impala knows that if your going to borrow shit, you want to borrow from the best. This is why I have no problem with the completely obvious fact that Greta Van Fleet — which is a rock band comprised of four dudes: three of whom are brothers — sound pretty much just like Communication Breakdown-era Led Zeppelin on this week’s video clip, “Highway Tune.” Because Led Zeppelin! It just does not get any better than that. Thank you drive through.

“Highway Tune” can be found on Greta Van Fleet’s brand new four-song debut EP, Black Smoke Rising, which was just released this past Friday, April 21st, 2017 (on Lava Records). Enjoy!

Greta Van Fleet Band
Cute Band Alert!

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Tiddlywinks in a Glass

Glass of Pink Tiddly Winks
Photos By Gail

To be honest, the translucent pink disks that fill this glass are probably not official Tiddlywinks, since Tiddlywinks is a competitive game involving four colors of winks, none of which is pink. I like looking at them though.

Glass of Pink Tiddly Winks