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Modern Art Monday Presents: Lyonel Charles Feininger, Lehnstedt

Lehnstedt
All Photos By Gail

Born in New York to German American musicians,  Lyonel Charles Feininger (18711956) travelled to Germany in 1887, and remained in Europe for several years to study art. While in Paris, he encountered Cubism and embraced its rationality and abstraction of form and space. “Cubism is a synthesis,” the painter explained, “but it may be degraded into mechanism. My Cubism is visionary, not physical.”

Feininger most famously applied his visionary style to architectural subjects that resonated with metaphysical meaning, especially churches. Here, the artist depicts the village church of Lehnstedt (1917) and its wooded environs with his characteristic crystalline and refracted forms.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

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Video Clip of The Week: Moby Rich, “Yoko Ono”


I feel no shame in confessing that the highlight of my day — and I do mean every single day — is the moment I slip into my bed after being swept away by too much TV and snuggle in the darkness with my pillows and comforter until I achieve full comfort, and drift off into a marvelously dream-filled sleep. Because sleeping is my jam. I once had a dream where my bed became a car, and I took to the streets for the day’s adventures with no one seeming to even notice that my vehicle was, in fact, a bed. Unlike those stress-dreams where you are either naked or sitting on a toilet in public, it was awesome.

It is surely no surprise then that the video for “Yoko Ono,” from a brand new LA-based musical duo called Moby Rich (because those are their names) sold me at around the 50 second mark, as Moby (and) Rich take the John-and-Yoko-Bed-In theme to a delightful extreme. I predict you will also sit totally rapt as the duo – still clad in color-coordinating blue pajamas — cruise in their tiwn beds out onto the streets of downtown LA while singing about their dream of finding an ideal other — a “Yoko Ono Muse” if you will — who completes them. Can you even imagine how much fucking fun this video was to film? I can’t even.

Aurally, “Yoko Ono” is a stone groove: a wistful love song floating in on a trip-hop beat that’s just the perfect mix of electronica and blue-eyed soul that would turn Daryl Hall green with envy. I fucking love it, and I think you will as well. “Yoko Ono” the single is out now on TaP Records, and it will eventual show up on the duo’s forthcoming debut EP. Enjoy!

Moby Rich Duo

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Satin Victorian Women’s Shoe

Pink Satin Victorian Ladies Slipper
Photos By Gail

This Pink Satin women’s shoe circa 1858 is typical of the dainty, flat-soled slippers that well-to-do Victorian women wore as evening wear and to formal events throughout most of the 19th century.

Pink Satin Victorian Ladies Slipper

The delicate natured of women’s footwear indicates that even when outside of the home, the ideal Victorian lady did not require functional or reliable shoes. As the century went on, flat slippers like these were replace by heeled satin pumps.

Pink Satin Victorian Ladies Slipper

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Rebel Women: Defying Victorianism, On View at the Museum of the City of New York Through January 6th, 2019.

Kanye West As Saint Sebastian

Kanye Saint Sebastian
Photo By Gail

Kanye West is a person who embodies everything that is pathetic and sad about pop culture. The fact that he is married to a Kardashian sister and worships Dump makes him even more repugnant to me.  I don’t really see how he has fans, but there is no accounting for taste. This mural by street artist Sac Six  portrays West as Saint Sebastian.The mural is excellent, but Kanye is a pathetic loser whose only talent is for shameless self promotion. Yawn City.  Please stop making this man famous.

Eye On Design: Simple Music Player for Dementia Patients

Simple Music Player
Photos By Gail

For patients suffering from dementia, the benefits of listening to music are significant, both for quality of life and for improving cognizance and lucidity.  The design of this Simple Music Player (2014) — a pre-loaded MP3 player — is radically simplified for ease of operation, and it appears non-threatening and recognizably familiar.

Simple Music Player

Once pre-loaded with the individual’s favorite music or an audio book, the user can activate  —  or stop — play by simply lifting the lid.

Designed by Lyndon Owen, Maurice Thompson and Bruce Barnet. Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan as Part of the Exhibit, Access and Ability.

 

Meet Phil

Phil
All Photos By Gail

This little dude, who  I am just going to call Phil, is by a street artist also named Phil.  He resides in a derelict Fire Alarm Box mounted on a light pole at the northwest  corner of West 21st Street and 10th Avenue, in the Chelsea Gallery District. The only other post I was able to find on Phil leads me to believe this piece has been on the street since 2011. That’s a long ass time in NYC Street Art Life.

NW Corner of W 21 and 10th Ave

With his purple hoodie and his boom-box, Phil is maybe a little like the Roaming Gnome of Chelsea. Or maybe not.

Phil

It looks like he dropped some green. If you have any information on the Phil who made this art, please leave it in the comments. Thanks!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Marianne Stokes, Death And The Maiden

Death and the Maiden
Photo By Gail

By depicting a young maiden meeting the personification of death, Austrian painter Marianne Stokes (18551927) was drawing on medieval and Renaissance prototypes. Stokes cast a genderless angel as Death. The angel’s lantern and outstretched hand, its wing that enfolds the girl, and the newly fallen blossoms that litter the bedroom floor give this depiction of a girl’s imminent passing its poignant, quiet horror.

Photographed as Part of The Exhibit Women Artists In Paris, on View Through September 3rd, 2018 at The Clark Institute, Located in Williamstown, Massachusetts.