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Keith Haring NYC Pride Cake

Keith Haring Cake
Photos By Gail

This delicious-looking, multi-tiered cake couldn’t help but catch my eye as we passed the Empire Cake, where it was prominently displayed in the bakery shop’s front window. Check out the colorful fondant cut-outs in the shapes of some of the most iconic works by the late artist and activist Keith Haring. Brilliant.

Empire Cake is Located at 112 Eight Avenue (Between 15th and 16th Streets) in Chelsea, NYC.

Keith Haring Cake

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Charring Cross Bridge By Andre Derain

Charring Cross Bridge
Photo By Gail

In this cityscape, Andre Derain (1880 – 1954) rendered the London sky with dramatic color. In the summer of 1905, he developed the bright palette of Charring Cross Bridge while painting alongside his elder peer, Henri Matisse in Coullioure, France. There, the two artists produced their most radical paintings to date — paintings purged of shadows and filled with imaginative, unbridled colors. When several of these works were exhibited in Paris that fall, the public and critics found the palette to be startling, and ridiculed their efforts. As Derain later recalled, “It was the era of photography. This may have influenced us, and played a part in our reaction against anything resembling a snapshot of life. Colors became charges of dynamite.”

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

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Video Clip of The Week: GoldFish, “Talk to Me”

Few things fill me with a degree of ecstatic delight to rival that of finding an excellent animated clip for the weekly jam, because it brings us all closer to the gleeful vibe of the weekend-morning cartoons that many of us were addicted to as kids. Today, I invite you to enjoy a flight through space courtesy of the track “Talk to Me” from San Diego-by-way-of-South Africa electronic dance duo, GoldFish. Speaking about the track, This Song Is Sick offers that the group’s “unique style of house is apparent with a dance-driven approach making use of bouncing, deep basslines, jazzy and bright melodies with uplifting vocals while sax lines are thrown in perfectly.” “Talk to Me” is visualized by the familiar style of animator Mike Scott (Disney/ Nickoldeon/ Cartoon Brew).

“Talk to Me” can be found on the duo’s fifth studio album, Late Night People, which is out now via Armada Music. International tour dates for GoldFish are below. Enjoy!

Tour Dates for GoldFish Live:

Date   Location      Venue
SUN  10/8/17         Austin, TX Austin City Limits Festival
SAT   10/14/17       San Diego, CA The Music Box
SUN  10/15/17       Austin, TX Austin City Limits Festival
WED 10/18/17      BRISTOL UK Cirque du Soul
FRI    10/20/17      Amsterdam, Netherlands ADE at MELKWEG – Sold-Out
SUN   10/22/17     PARIS, FR Nouveau Casino
MON  10/23/17    NOTTINGHAM, UK Cirque du Soul
WED  10/25/17    Philadelphia, PA The Trocadero
THU  10/26/17     New York, NY PlayStation Theater
FRI    10/27/17     New York, NY Terminal 5
SAT   10/28/17     Boston, MA House of Blues
SUN  10/29/17     Live Oak, FL Hulaween
SAT   11/11/17       Sao Paulo, Brazil Music Motion Presents GoldFish
SAT   11/11/17       Itu, Brazil Anzu Club
WED 11/15/17      Praia Brava – Itajahi, Brazil Habbitat
FRI   11/17/17       Haras Manoel Leão, Brazil TBA
SAT  11/18/17       Belo Horizonte, Brazil Só Trak Boa
SUN  12/10/17     Capetown, South Africa Submerged w/ GoldFish

Goldfish Video Still

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Pink Thing Of The Day: Pink Panther Film Soundtrack By Henry Mancini

Pink Panther Film Soundtrack By Henry Mancini
Photo By Gail

Pink Panther Film Soundtrack Album By Henry Mancini was Photographed in the Museum of the Moving Image, Astoria Queens, New York.

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Stained Glass Mural By @Tapeartist on Avenue C Bus Shelter

Tape Artist Bus Station
All Photos By Gail

When I arrived for the start of my morning commute at the bus stop near the corner of Avenue C and 14th Street, adjacent to Stuyvesant Town, I encountered a lovely surprise in the form of this psychedelic tape mural stretching across the back glass of the bus shelter. The geometric design by E.S. Klein, also known as Tape Artist, (@tapeartist) must have gone up prior to this past holiday weekend. I love it!

Tape Artist Stained Glass Mural Detail

The multi-color design is meticulously applied and really brightens up the bus shelter. My guess is that Klein put this up over the course of couple of late night sessions.

Tape Artist Tag

I hope that the City and the MTA lets it stay up.

Bus Stop Sign

If you want to add the Stained Glass Tape Mural to your next Urban Street Art Safari, here is the Bus Shelter’s location.

Bus Shelter

Tape Artist Stained Glass Mural Detail

Update: As of Friday 10/13 at 7:30 AM, This Mural Has Been Removed. Sadness!

Eye On Design: MacAndreas Tartan Mini Kilt with Sporran and Safety-Pin Mouthpiece By Vivienne Westwood

Westwood Kilt
All Photos By Gail

Pioneering designer Vivienne Westwood’s seminal 1993/94 Anglomania collection enshrined the kilt in high fashion. It was worn on the runway by Kate Moss, who sported the look shown here, and by Naomi Campbell, who famously fell while wearing the Super Elevation Gillie platforms. The kilt evolved from a single long piece of durable, harsh twill in muted colors that Scottish Highland men wrapped around the lower body, belted, and the passed over one shoulder.

Beginning in the late seventeenth century, pleats were sown into the back the skirt, loops were added for ease of belting, and the top length formed an autonomous garment. For Highland clans , the kilt symbolized familial, military and geographic loyalties. Following a series of incursions known as the Jacobite Uprisings, the garment was banned by English law in 1746, and its use declined precipitously. The kilt was revived by nineteenth-century elites, who invented new traditions around its use.

Kilt Sporran Detail
Kilt Sporran Detail

Worn by the military until the mid-twentieth century, the kilt became a nostalgic symbol for Scottish nationals in diaspora, and it is a common element of girls’ private school uniforms and ceremonial wedding attire. Punks subversively paired it with hoodies and graphic T-shirts

Photographed at part of the Exhibit, Items: Is Fashion Modern? on Through January 28th, 2018 at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Adrián Villar Rojas’ The Theater of Disappearance On The Roof of The Met

Theater of Dissappearance
All Photos By Gail

The cooler, more inclement weather that comes with Fall is slowly encroaching, which means that the annual Roof Garden exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is about close. So, if you’ve not yet made a visit to see Adrián Villar Rojas’ fantastic installation, The Theater of Disappearance, you have until October 29th, 2017 to check out (weather permitting of course) this unique exhibit that strongly resembles the post-apocalyptic aftermath of a very fancy dinner party.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

For this site specific-installation, Argentian artist Adrián Villar Rojas (b. 1980) used the Museum itself as his subject material; drawing on objects in the collection and the history of collecting practices. To realize the extensive work, the artist immersed himself in The Met, and with its staff over many months, held conversations with the curators, conservators, managers, and technicians — 3-D scanning and imaging experts —  across every department, who all contributed to the realization of this installation. Conceived as a holistic environment, The Theater of Disappearance transfers the space of the Roof Garden into a performative diorama.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Sixteen black and white sculptures incorporate nearly one hundred detailed replicas of objects from The Met’s collection – selected from a wide variety of time periods and cultures, and reconfigured as amalgamations, The Theater of Disappearance encompasses thousands of years of artistic production over several continents and cultures, and fuses them with facsimiles of contemporary human figures as well as furniture, animals, cutlery, and food. Each object — whether a 1,000-year-old decorative plate or a human hand — is rendered in the same black or white material and coated in a thin layer of dust.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Architecture is folded into the fabric of the work. Villar Rojas’s intervention includes two radical new flooring systems – one checkerboard and the other a reflective metallic surface – as well as a redesigned bar, benches, new plantings, and an extended pergola overhead, creating dramatic setting that transforms the panoramic views of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline into theatrical backdrops for the installation.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

The total effect of sculptures and environment is a dazzling, disorienting scene where all senses of the interpretive history associated with Museum objects has vanished, making way for and alternative history for art.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

This project is dedicated to the memory of Ronald Street, The Met’s first head of digital imaging. Please enjoy more photos, which I shot during two separate visits this past summer!

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Dissappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance