Video Clip of The Week: Pictureplane, “Joyrider”


Are you ready to rock? You will be, once you hit “play” (remembering to strap-in first) on this week’s Video Clip for the tune “Joyrider”, from one-man electronic dance outfit, Pictureplane (AKA producer Travis Egedy). In a song that combines vibrant electronic dance and pop without ever losing sight of the melody, Pictureplane’s flow is ultra-smooth and his beats are super sick. I love this song! Shot primarily an auto salvage yard, with interspersed shots of Egedy in a driving simulator (Joy Ride – get it?), or dancing in a yellow spray-painted room, the video is visually engaging from start to finish. If I heard “Joyrider” in a club, I would dance my ass off to it all night.

“Joyrider” can be found on Pictureplane’s most recent album, Technomancer, which is out now via the Anticon Records label. Recommend if you like: Tame Impala, MGMT or BØRNS. Enjoy!

PicturePlane

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Bike in Copenhagen

Pink Bike
Photo By Gail

Something we learned very quickly while visiting the Danish city of Copenhagen in early June is that people like to Ride Bikes there. Thirty-Six percent of the population commutes to work a bike, and they are just fucking everywhere, so you had better watch out! It is insane, and yet, not insane, because it saves gas and is better for you and the environment. I took this photo of nice Pink Bike while my sister and I took shelter from a thunder storm on our way to see some sites. Copenhagen is an awesome city and I would go back for another visit in a heartbeat.

Fun Facts About Star Trek Beyond!

Star Trek Beyond Facts Header

Hey all you Trekkies out there! Why no get yourselves all excited for the arrival of the newest film adventure in the Star Trek franchise, Star Trek Beyond, which hits theaters Friday, July 22nd (Previews on Thursday, July 21st), by polishing up on your Trekkie Trivia with the rad infographic below! Enjoy!

Star Trek Beyond Facts Body
Image Courtesy of Morphsuits.com!

Let’s Go: A Summer Evening Walk on the High Line!

Path View Looking Uptown
All Photos By Gail

Hello, and welcome to our second installation of Let’s Go: a fun, informative and photo-heavy column in which I tell you Where To Go…in NYC, for summer sun and fun! This week, we are taking an early evening walk on the NYC High Line, a public park built on a historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. The High Line runs from Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District to West 34th Street, and snakes along between 10th and 12th Avenues.

Purple Fluffy Flowers

Geoffrey and I can often be seen travelling to and from the Chelsea Galleries via the High Line because, while it is usually way crowded at this time of year, it is still less congested than walking at street level, where you have to stop for traffic lights and look out for cars and idiots playing Pokemon Go.

This walk took place on a Saturday night in June, at around 7 PM. Please enjoy!

Purple Flowers

First of all, would not even believe the variety of gorgeous flowers, and flowering  trees and plants, that you will see sprouting up just everywhere. It is like a botanical garden of urban delights.

Fluffy White Flowering Tree

This tree looks like it has dandelion puffs all up in its branches. Dandelion Tree!

Pods

What kind of plant has pods like this? I want to know. To me they look like gnocchi.

Roof Tops with ESB

As I walk along, I enjoy taking artsy fartsy photos of the tops of buildings. You may recognize the tall silver one.

Window Spy Pic

It is cool to test the zoom capability of your camera’s lens by taking spy photos into the windows of luxury high rise buildings that border the path. Super fun.

HL 23 Building

This is an elevation shot of the HL 23 Building, which you can also see just left of center in this post’s top photo.

Zaha Hadid Building

This curved residential building — soon to be full of multi-million dollar condominiums — was designed by the late architect Zaha Hadid. You can read more about the building at This Link.

White Flowers and Track

I don’t know what these are, but they sure do smell good.

Yellow Flowers

You may feel like you are in the country, but you’re not. You’re in the jungle, baby!

Pig People Graffiti

Sometimes you can find interesting graffiti; sometimes, not so much. These little dudes that look like dancing bulls; I see them everywhere.

Graffiti Tags on Building

You can also see many different kinds of legitimate Public Art on, or from, the High Line, most of which was commissioned specifically for the park.

Long Purple Flowers and Buildings

Purple Daisies

If you walk all the way to the end of the High Line, close to Javits Center it is a good place to watch the sunset over the Hudson River.

Sunset on the High Line

This not the best photo of a sunset ever taken, but you get the idea.

Flowers Through The Cracks

While it is still summer, you should take a walk on the High Line.

Pink Fluffy Flower

Urbanimal Graffiti Van, Part 2

Urbanimal Graffiti Van
All Photos By Gail

Urbanimal is street artist from Brooklyn, NY who paints on vans, cars and trucks. His work is colorful, tribal, psychedelic and fun.

Urbanimal Tag

All of his projects have the Urbanimal tag somewhere on the body. Accept no substitutes.

Urbanimal Graffiti Van 2

This van was spotted on the downtown side of West 34th Street, not far from the Hudson Yards 7 Train Station.

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Coney Art Walls 2016: A Different View

Coney Art Walls 2016 Signage
All Photos By Gail

Geoffrey and I went out to Coney Island equipped with a minor agenda that included eating at Wahlburgers (disappointing), attending a concert at the new amphitheater (nice venue, underwhelming artist) and visiting the new-for-2016 Coney Art Walls. We saw the Art Walls Last Summer and they were amazing! Unfortunately, when we tried to enter the space this past weekend, we were told that they were closed for a private party, and that we could pay $15 if we wanted to gain admittance to see them, and also be subjected to what sounded like the worst music ever in the universe of all time. We declined. “Come back tomorrow,” we were told, but that wasn’t going to happen when a 90-minmute subway ride is involved.

Marie Roberts
Art By Marie Roberts

So, what I decided to do was take some photos of the walls that surround the exterior border of the Art Wall Pavilion (or whatever they call it) and also shove my camera between gaps in the chain link fence to get some other crappy shots. Because it was overcast and rainy out, so not great picture-taking weather anyway. You’re welcome.

John Ahearn, Haze Tribute to MCA
Foreground by John Ahearn, Background, A Tribute to MCA By Haze

New artists participating in the 2016 Art Walls include Nina Chanel Abney, John Ahearn, Timothy Curtis, D*Face, Jessica Diamond, Tristan Eaton, Gaia, Eric Haze, Icy & Sot, London Police, Nychos, Pose, Stephen Powers, Tats Cru, and Sam Vernon. Returning artists who created new works are Lady Aiko, Mister Cartoon, Crash, Daze, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, and Marie Roberts.

D*Face
Art By D*Face

Tristan Eaton
Art By Tristan Eaton

A few of the 2015 Walls are still on display, including those by Buff Monster, Eine, Ron English, How & Nosm, IRAK, Kashink, Lady Pink, Miss Van, RETNA, eL Seed and Sheryo & Yok. You can see some of those in last year’s post at This Link! There are also three community walls.

Nychos
Nychos After Dark: Dissected Ronald McDonald

The Coney Art Walls are located at on Stillwell Avenue (right behind Nathan’s) at Coney Island, Brooklyn, NY 11224.

Cyclops Mermaid

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Eye on Design: Graphic Designer and Art Director Robin Hercia

Love the One Your with Poster
Love the One You’re With Poster By Robin Hercia (All Images Courtesy of the Artist)

To build a livelihood at the juncture where fine art and design merge, Robin Hercia drew on her experience as a multidisciplinary artist, tapped into her intuitive sense of how to individually serve each client, and sought to infuse appropriate projects with an essence of earth-based and eastern spiritual practices to establish a truly unique, bespoke approach to brand identity, graphic design and art direction. Based in Los Angeles, AWMYL is Hercia’s design studio, where she creates exciting graphic, surface, and printed product design specializing in, but not limited to, brand identities and products for clients working in the arenas of wellness, healing, yoga and mysticism.

Coming from a fine art background, the talented designer has an extensive resume of diverse works that include painting, screen-printing and installation. Her artwork (created under the name Robin Redd) has been exhibited in Canada, Europe and the US, including events such as 2009’s Aqua Art Fair in Miami, and Scope Miami Beach in 2013.

Collaboration with Jon Todd
El Campeon Grande (Collaboration with Jon Todd, Aqua Art Fair Miami 2009)

Message In a Bottle
Installation series for Message in a Bottle Exhibition Curated by Lori Zimmer (Scope Miami Beach 2013)

Air14 Multi-use Geodesic Dome
AIR14 Installation (Wynwood at Art Basel 2014)

Her project AIR14, a multi-use Geodesic Dome, was also featured in The Art of Cardboard: Big Ideas for Creativity, Collaboration, Storytelling, and Reuse by Lori Zimmer.

Screen Print with Eyes and Rabbits
Above and Below, Havemeyer, Spray Paint, Screen Print, and Hand Embellished, SMASH Toronto

Screen Print with Rabbits

In 2012, Hercia relocated from Toronto to Southern California, opening AWMYL in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles in the spring of 2015. She initially works with imagery and materials that are analog and tangible in origin, and later transitions artwork for further manipulation digitally. The same personal interest in spirituality that inspires her fine artwork also informs her design practice at AWMYL. “I’ve spent years studying alternative or earth-based spiritual practices, such as Wicca, paganism, voodou, Golden Dawn, Theosophy, Buddhism, and Native American traditions, among others,” Hercia explains.

Tarot Poster
Poster for Redondo Beach Tarot Card Reader Joseph Lennon McCord (a.k.a. Joe Daddy)

“These studies are referenced in my work in obvious ways via graphics and imagery,” she continues, “but also subtly, in regards to what materials are used to create the image. I make a lot of my own dyes, pigments and inks from natural sources, which correspond, via assorted spiritual practices, to what the piece is about. For example, the indigo plant produces a blue color that is associated with Saturn, and it’s used to conjure protection, discipline, organization, and focus. In practice, if I’m creating a piece of art that reflects these qualities, or working on a design for a client who is, say, a healer or energy worker, then I’ll use an ink made from indigo to create that work. In the end, it means that the ink I’m dipping my pen into was designed to energetically attract the objective of that business.

Tony G Yoga Elemental Cards
Elemental Cards for Yoga Instructor, Tony G

AWMYL’s brand identity products include custom fabric and wallpaper design, signage, print materials (business cards, letterhead, posters) and anything else that the client requests. She’s even designed a set of divination cards for an international yoga instructor. “I work with graphic design, and that’s mostly what people see me doing right now, but behind the scenes I’m working with textiles, metal, and interior design. I have an upcoming contract with a new school, Dev Mason, which is a totally cool web development school. I’ll be creating not only their brand identity, but also working on custom elements for the interiors of their five campuses, and designing the entire space. It’s my first time acting as Art Director at this scale and I’m really thrilled about it!”

Love the One Youre With Postcards

Hercia also follows her own muse to create original projects just for the joy of it – her Love The One You’re With posters and postcards being an example. Hercia’s attraction to creating letterforms and fonts began in early childhood, while playing with Letraset transfer-sheet lettering, and 1970s-era design books. “I creatively re-drew the letters I saw in different variations,” she remembers. “When all you have to work with are letters and images, type is a very important component of graphic design. Creating custom letters, or altering letters to suit the application, is an integral technique in creating a feel and look. It’s a primary part of what I have to work with as a designer.”

Love The One You’re With is an original typeface that I designed using ancient calligraphic tools and techniques, modeled after a traditional, hand-tooled font,” Hercia explains. While adhering to a general set of rules, each letter of the series contains a characteristic that is unique. Love The One Your With is an exploration in mark making – with a calligraphic foundation, it combines decorative elements in both practical and non-practical application, based on a set of rules, depending on the geometry and construction of individual letters. The letterforms also explore the juxtaposition between extreme thick and thin strokes within the construct of each particular letter, as well as in relation to neighboring units.

The result is a typeface whose ornamentation isn’t necessarily obvious, but which alludes to mythological symbolism and alchemy, and maintains unexpected organic elements with some intrigue and surprise – encouraging the viewer to take time to observe each letter on its own as it is expressly unique from each of the others, in addition to seeing the written text as a whole. Curator and author Lori Zimmer recently commented that her impression of Hercia’s typeface work is that “it evokes a vintage tarot feel” – so the intention definitely translates to the end product.

Created with calligraphy pens and India ink on a Didot typeface foundation, the Love The One You’re With posters are printed digitally, while the postcards are printed using a Risograph printer, yielding very similar results to that of screen-printing. “I’m hoping to get those letters into a format that can be purchased and used by anyone,” says Hercia. “I’ve used it on a few client projects, and while it’s a highly decorative typeface, it certainly works well on particular applications.”

Design is a multifaceted discipline, and Hercia is extremely hands-on. “I’ve had extensive experience with all types of design, including textiles, screen printing, weaving, embroidery, ceramics, wood working, knitting/crochet, calligraphy, marbling, macrame, woven beadwork, photography, etc. I grasp new skills easily, so if I can visualize something for a particular client, I can physically make it. For example, in the outdoor portion of my studio, I create my own gritty textures that get scanned and used digitally in graphic projects using plants and dirt placed on photosensitive papers and films.”

Her creative input doesn’t stop once the design is completed. Hercia goes as far as making custom calligraphy pens from various found materials, used along with her homemade inks and pigments, to channel the spirit of the project. She’ll create a texture that makes a surface look antique, rather than downloading a pattern online that could be accessed and used anybody. “These might be elements that people will miss visually,” she says, “but I know it’s there.” Ultimately, AMWYL’s approach creates work that stands out in a sea of computer-designed graphics.

With interests in so many aspects of design, Hercia is building a design empire. AWMYL has an expanding clientele in the wellness industry including yoga teachers and tarot readers, and she is currently creating the identity for Mindful Mamas (mindfulmamas.com), an online source for everything from yoga and meditation to education and community support; all content relating to healthy, happy mothers.

Robin Hercia’s intuitive and informed, personalized art direction makes AWYML a go-to resource for a company’s brand identity and graphic design requirements. “Often, graphic design is created with the Helvetica font and lots of white space,” she concludes. “I wanted to make decorative objects, but with a completely different feel. I’ve been drawing letters since I was 5 or 6 and I’ve accumulated eight years of design education. My professional experience includes commercial textile design, operating my own screen printing studio, designing a line of knitwear, and working in fashion for Betsey Johnson. After 36 years of creative observation and involvement, I know that I look at things in a very different way than most people.”

Like AWMYL on FaceBook at This Link. Visit the website at AWMYL Dot Com.

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