Pink Thing of the Day: Pink Octopus Finger

Pink Tentacle Finger
All Photos By Gail

The Octopus Finger (in Pink) was spotted by me at Flying Tiger, a fantastic design and gift store on the Upper East Side! I am only sorry that I did not take a photo with these Pink Tentacles on the tips of my fingers!

Probably the coolest thing you can buy in Manhattan for only $1! What a Bargain!

Pink Tentacle Finger
Octopus Finger!

Find a Flying Tiger Store Near You at This Link!

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Yes, It Exists: Mr. Poopy Butthole Doll

Mr Poopy Butthole
Photo By Gail

I saw this little guy in the Barnes and Noble shop in Union Square, and was so tickled by his name alone that I had to snap a photo for the sole purpose of featuring him in this week’s Yes, It Exists column. From what I can garner off the interwebs, Mr. Poopy Butthole is character on the Adult Swim cartoon series, Rick & Morty, which I have only just started watching. If you feel compelled to know more about Mr. Poopy Butthole — and really, who could blame you for being curious — he has his own Wiki page located at This Link!

Eye On Design: Poltrona Bowl Chair By Lina Bo Bardi

Poltrona Bowl Chair
All Photos By Gail

Valuing geometric simplicity and economy of means, Lina Bo Bardi (1914 – 1992) designed the Poltona Bowl Chair with a steel frame and stackable seat containing two circular cushions.

Poltrona Bowl Chair

The shell on the metal ring can be adjusted in all directions to suit the position of the sitter. Bo Bardi, who emigrated from Italy to Brazil in 1946, played a lead role in advancing modernist architecture and design in postwar Brazil. Among the landmark buildings she designed was her Sao Paulo home, the Glass House (Casa de Vidro) which she furnished with Poltrona Bowl Chairs.

Poltrona Bowl Chair

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC, where it is on display for the first time as part of the exhibit, Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction, on view through August 13th, 2017.

95 Horatio Street By Do Ho Suh

95 Horatio Street Full Street
All Photos By Gail

If you stroll all the way to south end of the High Line to where the park terminates at Gansevoort Street in the meatpacking district, you may look across and consider that someone has blasted a passageway right through the building. But, that is an illusion.

95 Horatio Street

A new site-specific work by Korean artist Do Ho Suh (b. 1962) visually reconnects the building facade of 95 Horatio Street with the elevated railway that once occupied the neighborhood. Although today the High Line ends at Gansevoort Street, here Suh imagines what the vista might have looked like in the days when train tracks continued to run through buildings down into SoHo. 95 Horatio Street previously housed the Manhattan Refrigerator Company, which had a private siding for the railway, allowing direct access to St. John’s Terminal further downtown.

95 Horatio Street Close Up

The digitally rendered image, titled 95 Horatio Street, was just unveiled on June 26th, 2017, on the southwest corner of Gansevoort and Washington Streets. Suh is interested in the emotional and psychological significance of architectural space: its relation to personal memory and the collapse of time are themes he explores across media. His fabric recreations of former homes, meticulous rubbings of the interior of his New York apartment, and drawings of mobile and anthropomorphic architectural structures are evocative meditations on the definition of home, and how this definition is affected by displacement and context.

95 Horatio Street Detail

95 Horatio Street is the sixth work to be presented in this series of public art installations, organized by the Whitney Museum in partnership with TF Cornerstone and High Line Art.  This installation is organized by curatorial assistant Christie Mitchell.

Do Ho Suh: 95 Horatio Street will be on Exhibit For An As-Yet-Undetermined Period  of Time.

95 Horatio Street Perspective

Modern Art Monday Presents: Morning, Interior By Maximilien Luce

Morning Interior
Photo By Gail

This intimate scene, Morning, Interior (1890) depicts artist Maximilien Luce’s close friend, fellow painter, Neo-Impressionist Gustave Perrot getting up and dressing as morning light streams through a garret window. Luce enlivened the traditional subject of an artist in his humble living quarters with a vivid palette of red, orange, yellow and blue, applied in stippled brushstrokes, in keeping with the newly minted technique of pointillism. Little is known about Perrot, aside from the fact that he died young. In 1892, his brief career was remembered in a fifteen-work tribute held at Salon de Independants in Paris.

Morning Interior Detail
Morning, Interior, Detail

Video Clip of The Week: Flights Over Phoenix, “Middle Of The World”


Hey what’s up. I hope that you are enjoying your weekend. Now that we have done some cursory bonding, I would like to say that with today’s Video Clip of The Week, which is for the awesome song “Middle Of The World” from LA-based trio Flights Over Phoenix, it is my hope that I am exposing you to a potential ear-worm that is powerfully addictive enough to supplant Ed Sheeran’s quasi-pervy, aural seduction device, “Shape of You” — which, I am sure we will all agree, simply cannot be resisted. You’re welcome.

Filmed on location at Soggy Dry Lake, in the California desert, and visually styled in the manner of, say, a John Varvatos photo shoot, “Middle Of The World” features the band performing on an arid plane punctuated only by inflated black balloons tethered to the dry earth like bobbing, mutant cacti. And speaking of cacti, the protagonist of our story is an anthropomorphic cactus who finds a picture postcard of California and decides to take a cross-country journey to the beach  — trading one sandy environment for another, but with a few essential differences that change his world completely. In this way, “Middle of The World” serves as a powerful metaphor for breaking free from your restrictive comfort zone to find what you need in order to attain a state of true happiness, or something like that. Heavy.

Aurally, “Middle Of The World” is guilt-free ear candy. The lyrics convey a universal message of self-empowerment and lead singer Keith Longo has a voice like butter.  The band explains that, “‘Middle Of The World’ is a song that explores the feelings of isolation through imagery that one might experience in a dream of that nature. In writing the song, we wanted it to feel like a journey, and so we wanted the music to be up-tempo and have a lot of movement.” Mission accomplished.

“Middle Of The World” can be found on the band’s newly-released EP, Where I Comedown. Like them on the FaceBook at This Link! Enjoy!

Flights Over Phoenix Band
Flights Over Phoenix are Chris Santillo, Jordan Nuanez and Keith Longo.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Glitter Lips Handbag

Pink Lips Handbag
Photo By Gail

I stopped into the Aldo accessories boutique yesterday afternoon after scoring a serious shoe bargain next door at Century 21, and  just fell in love this glittery pink handbag shaped like a  pair of luscious lips! This beautiful bag is compact, yet roomy enough to hold a decants amount of your crap besides just a smart phone and wallet, and includes a slender shoulder strap for cross body accretion. OMG so cute. Get yours at Aldo, located at  470 Broadway (and other locations – Google them!) in Manhattan, or buy it online for $45.00 at This Link!