Benefits of Meditation on the Body and Mind

Meditating Woman
Image Source

If you have a stressful life, as so many people do, then you will love those moments when you can relax and unwind. However, not everyone has the time to relax, or at least they don’t think they do. The thing you need to remember is that no matter how busy you are, you should always make time for yourself and that means unwinding. There is no better way to relax your body and mind than with some meditation. Here are some of the benefits of meditating regularly.

Increased Immunity

Relaxation, in general, can boost your resistance to many things. Studies have shown that daily meditation can help boost your immune system and increase your antibodies. It has also been found to benefit natural killer cells in the elderly, providing greater immunity to tumors and viruses. The key to this working effectively, is that meditation is practiced consistently and, if not daily, regularly.

Balancing Emotions

Meditation can also help you to keep your emotions in check. It can be a difficult thing to master totally, but by regular practice, it can lead to promising results. The idea is that the meditation will clean your memories and emotions to give you a calmer state of mind.

Better Sex Life and Fertility

If you have had trouble with your sex life or trying to conceive, it can cause a lot of stress and anxiety. Anxiety can actually make the situation worse, so it’s important that you try and relax. A recent study at the University of Australia showed that women are more likely to conceive when they are more relaxed. Stress and anxiety can also affect sperm production and impotence. By practicing daily meditation and including aids such as those from Bath Mate you can increase your chances of conceiving and enjoy a better sex life.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Suffering from diarrhea, bloating and constipation is not pleasant, though many thousands of people have these symptoms as a result of IBS. However, a study in The Harvard Gazette showed that those who practiced meditation twice a day found their symptoms dramatically improved. It was so effective that it was recommended as a long-term treatment.

Calmness

There is a difference between the mind that is relaxed by mediation and the mind that isn’t. A thought in a meditative mind is witnessed and is allowed to flourish or die, but the same thought in a regular mind is allowed to grow and cause problems. It is this ability to control thoughts and discard those that are harmful that is one of the biggest benefits of meditation. Negative thoughts can cause a lot of problems both mental and physical, so it is important to put these thoughts in perspective.

There are many techniques which people who meditate use, and they all have a different effect on the body and mind. By practicing these techniques and doing so regularly, you can create a better environment for you to live and thrive.

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Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Rubber House on an Exercise Bike

Trimcycle By Battle Creek
All Photos By Gail

Trimcycle By Battle Creek is the name of this sculpture, which is comprised of a Pink Silicone Rubber House draped over a vintage Exercise Bicycle. It is part of the exhibit Bent, by artist Brian Tolle, from his group series known collectively as Levittown.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

Here’s a bit more about the series from C24 Gallery:

A keen observer of domestic life and identity, Brian Tolle furthers his interest of politics of place in his Levittown sculptures. The sculptures are inspired by the planned housing community, Levittown: the historic town in Long Island, NY, which became the archetype of American suburban life in the early 1950s. Each of Tolle’s eleven sculptures is a precise scaled model of an original Levittown home — cast from the same mold, varying only in color and displaying the architectural details of the original structures.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

The sculptural houses themselves resemble deflated or melting membranes, and are supported by various appropriated mementos of suburban life – found toys, tire swing, shopping cart, a plastic nativity set, and a recliner. These iconographic items rest underneath and inside silicone rubber skins of the houses, emphasizing a dialogue between sites and domestic artifacts. As the title of the exhibition suggests, the artworks presented in Bent provoke a re-reading, or discord between reality and fiction. The formal play that Tolle visually articulates between shapes and textures, private and public spaces presents a challenge to standard architectural, as well as behavioral conventions and norms.

Photographed at the C24 Gallery in Manhattan.

Flight/Equip.: United Airlines 3480 E7W

Yes, It Exists: Deep Fried Toy Tanks

Deep Fried Toy Tank
Photos By Gail

This deep-fried toy tank is one of seven identical models that make up the artwork entitled Visual Art, Add Oil! March Forward! (19992005) by Chinese artist Zheng Guogu.

Deep Fried Toy Tanks

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Art and China After 1989 at the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.

Eye On Design: Wolf Kahan Tuxedo Owned By Adolf De Meyer

Adolph De Meyer Tuxedo
Photos By Gail

A member of the “international set” in fin-de-siècle Europe, Baron Adolf de Meyer (1868–1946) was also a pioneering photographer, known for creating works that transformed reality into a beautiful fantasy. De Meyer likely acquired this tuxedo from the venerable tailor Wolf Kahan during a visit to Vienna. Kahan’s shop, designed by the modernist architect Adolf Loos, catered to the city’s leading artists. The tailor’s son Louis worked from 1925 to 1927 as a designer for the Paris couturier Paul Poiret, whose collections De Meyer photographed.

De Meyer was considered an arbiter of style; he wrote columns for Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar that instructed American women on the latest European trends in fashion and interior decoration. His columns  also offered tips on hostess etiquette and entertaining. For a time, De Meyer produced his own couture line, Gayne House, sold through his New York shop, Zarah.

Adolph De Meyer Tuxedo
Wolf Kahan Tuxedo Circa 1930. Jacket and Trousers: Black Wool Broadcloth and Silk Satin
Vest: Black Wool Twill, Rayon Grosgrain, and Silk Plain Weave

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Quicksilver Brilliance: Adolf De Meyer Photographs, on View Through April 8th, 2018 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Pots Sign

Pots Sign Detail
Photos By Gail

I’m guessing not everybody will notice that the backside of this otherwise ordinary Stop Sign, located at the corner of Gansevoort and Hudson Streets in the Meatpacking District, gives a subtle endorsement of The Green.

Pots Sign Intersection

Modern Art Monday Presents: The Seven Deadly Sins By Paul Cadmus

Seven Deadly Since Series
All Photos By Gail

Paul Cadmus (December 17, 1904 – December 12, 1999) was an American artist, best known for his egg tempera paintings of gritty social interactions in urban settings. His paintings combine elements of eroticism and social critique in a style often called magic realism. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has recently reintroduced a series of his thematic paintings, The Seven Deadly Sins (1945 – 49), for exhibit in the museum’s Modern and Contemporary Art Galleries, and they are amazingly graphic works of surrealist horror art that are really something to see.

Lust
Lust (1945)

Pride
Pride (1945)

Between 1945 and 1949, Paul Cadmus turned his dexterous hand and fertile imagination to rendering the Seven Deadly Sins, a subject with biblical antecedents that artists (including Hieronymus Bosch and Pieter Bruegel the Elder) have explored since the Middle Ages.

Envy
Envy (1947)

Anger
Anger (1947)

Cadmus’s interpretation extends his predilection for social satire to surreal extremes of excess, vulgarity and gore. Of the series, Cadmus explained, “I don’t appear as myself, but I am all of the Deadly Sins in a way, as you all are, to.

Avarice
Avarice (1947)

Sloth
Sloth (1947)

Gluttony
Gluttony (1949)

Video Clip Of The Week: Hippo Campus, “Buttercup”


Hey whats up. I don’t know about you but, without getting into the gory details, my brain is about to explode from the non-stop, mortifying horrorshow that passes for news in this crazy world in which we now find ourselves living. Sigh. This morning, I would enjoy watching some colorful animated images bounce around on my eyeballs while thoroughly delightful pop music plays in the background. I found this hallucination-inducing clip from the band Hippo Campus (which is a part of your brain) buried in my inbox. I dig it. Maybe get yourself some pancakes while you check out this tune called “Buttercup,” which comes from the group’s debut album, Landmark, out now on Grand Jury Music. Enjoy!

Hippo Campus Video Still