Video Clip Of The Week: Hippo Campus, “Buttercup”


Hey whats up. I don’t know about you but, without getting into the gory details, my brain is about to explode from the non-stop, mortifying horrorshow that passes for news in this crazy world in which we now find ourselves living. Sigh. This morning, I would enjoy watching some colorful animated images bounce around on my eyeballs while thoroughly delightful pop music plays in the background. I found this hallucination-inducing clip from the band Hippo Campus (which is a part of your brain) buried in my inbox. I dig it. Maybe get yourself some pancakes while you check out this tune called “Buttercup,” which comes from the group’s debut album, Landmark, out now on Grand Jury Music. Enjoy!

Hippo Campus Video Still

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Pink Thing of the Day: David Bowie Quote on Book Spines

David Bowie Quote on Book Spines
Photo By Gail

This quote by the late great David Bowie — “Tomorrow Belongs to Those Who Can Hear it Coming” — gets a vibrant new life when printed on the spines of horizontally stacked book that have been wrapped in pink paper or vinyl. According to this source, “Tomorrow belongs to those who can hear it coming” was the slogan David Bowie coined to promote Heroes, the second installment of his great Berlin album trilogy. It neatly captures one of his most important talents: to intuit the future and draw it forward into the popular culture of the present. Sometimes he would simply grasp the importance of a trend, as when he understood that the arrival of the internet would transform the economics of the music industry and the relationship between artists and audiences. But more often it was his artistry in self-reinvention that opened up new modes of cultural expression or brought shooting up to the surface deeper social trends. When he famously threw his arms round Mick Ronson’s shoulders on Top of the Pops, he was doing more than advertising his bisexuality. He was helping catalyze the liberation in the politics of sexual identity that would unfold in the 1970s.

Photographed at the New York Now Home Show at Javits Center in February of 2018.

Marguerite Humeau’s Sphinx Joachim On The High Line

Sphinx Joachim
All Photos By Gail

I haven’t walked much on the High Line this winter, and I specially try to stay away from it at night, when there could be hidden ice or slippery conditions, or when isolation could make for unsafe circumstances. But this past week I was at an opening on 28th Street and decided on the spur of the moment to just walk the few blocks along the elevated park until I reached 23rd Street and could walk down to a bus. What scary fun it was to come upon this sculpture waiting in the semi-darkness at 24th Street!

Sphinx Joachim

This imposing figure is called Sphinx Joachim, and he is creation of artist Marguerite Humeau (b. 1986, France). Humeau is fond of using her artworks to weave factual events into speculative narratives, enabling unknown, invisible, or extinct forms of life to erupt in grandiose splendor. For the High Line, Humeau has proposed a sphinx as a winged lion that protects the site against potential enemies. Equipped with motion detectors, Sphinx Joachim roars as an alarm every time it senses a human presence. Scary, especially in the dark!

Sphinx Joachim

Sphinx Joachim is part of the High Line’s Mutations series and will be on display through March, 2018.

Valentines Day Window Display!

Valentines Window Display
Photo By Gail

Spotted On Madison Avenue near 76th Street. Have a Lovely and Loving Valentines Day, Dear Readers!

Eye On Design: Vista Picture Frames Made From Recycled Styrofoam!

Table Display of Frames
All Photos By Gail

If you are anything like me, framed favorite artwork and photos are not only a huge part of your home decor, they’re also an important part of how you rock your personal style.  I love a nice frame so much, I often pick up one that catches my eye even before I have something in mind to go inside it. Maybe you never considered that a  picture frame manufacturer could be a force in the campaign to sustain our planet, but at a recent IHA Press Event, I was introduced to a collection of gorgeous and innovative modern framing solutions from Vista Frame Company which are all created from one of our most notoriously non-biodegradable, manmade materials: Polystyrene (aka Styrofoam). Unbelievable, but true!

Table Display With Foam Example

Did you know that consumers discard about 5 billion pounds of  styrofoam annually? That’s crazy! The story is that even before Vista became a frame company, they were trying to do anything they could to protect our enviroment. Because of this, Vista created a styrofoam recycling machine, and they have placed these machines all over the world, taking away a portion of the 5 billion pounds of styrofoam that would otherwise end up in a landfill every year. Once styrofoam is broken down in these machines, they ship it to their factory and create Vista Frames from the recycled, pelletized styrofoam.

Frame Recycling Step 1

Pink Accent Frame

Vista Frames are super stylish, and of such high quality you would never guess they were not made of wood, plastic, metal or other traditional materials. I love that this company is making a beautiful, functional products and taking care of the Earth in the process. Vista makes the perfect frame for every photo or piece  of frame-able artwork in your home.

Pineapple Art Print

Each piece even comes with a fun print that you just might want to leave in the frame! Find out more about Vista Frames, and shop the collection, at This Link!

Vista Frame Company Signage

Product Review: Good Karma Non-Dairy Yogurt

Good Karma Non-Dairy Yogurt
All Photos By Gail

More and more it seems, food allergies or intolerances to commonly used ingredients such as nuts, wheat, soy and dairy no longer have to keep you from indulging in your favorite foods. For example, Yogurt lovers who have been missing out on this creamy treat due to a lactose intolerance can now enjoy healthy and great tasting Good Karma dairy-free yogurt, which I recently had the chance to taste test at home, after first meeting product representatives last summer at a food show.

Good Karma Label View

Vegan-friendly and free of major allergens, Good Karma is versatile, creamy, fresh and delicious.  This dairy free yogurt is made with flax milk (derived from cold-pressed flaxseed oil) which is a rich source of Omega-3 healthy fats. Each serving of Good Karma contains 5-6 grams of plant-based protein, plus 7 live and active cultures to aid digestion. Even better: each 6 ounce serving has only 90 calories!

Good Karma Blueberry CupGood Karma Blueberry

As you can see by the photo above of the Blueberry variety spooned into a serving dish, Good Karma is very creamy in texture and not at all gelatinous, as is Greek-style yogurt. The fruit is already blended in, rather than being at the bottom of the cup, so you get a very consistent fruit flavor in every bite.

Good Karma Raspberry
Good Karma Raspberry

Using plant-based milks, the company’s goal is always to create a delicious yogurt that gets as close as possible to a traditional dairy yogurt, while also being free of all major allergens, with added protein and a tangy, fruity taste that makes you smile!

Good Karma Strawberry Cup

Besides these three luscious fruit flavors, Good Karma dairy free yogurt also comes in comes in Plain and Vanilla varieties.

Parfait Recipe

I tasted the Vanilla Good Karma at the aforementioned food show, where I was served a tasty fun yogurt  parfait recipe that knocked my socks off! Find out more about Good Karma dairy-free products (made with Flax Milk, which, as you can see below, they also offer), plus get recipes like the one you see above, and download money-saving coupons good towards your first purchase of Good Karma, at this link!

Good Karma Flax Milk
Good Karma Non-Dairy Yogurt and Flax Milk Products!

Modern Art Monday Presents: David Hockney, A Bigger Splash

A Bigger Splash
Photo By Gail

David Hockney’s most famous paintings of Los Angeles, such as A Bigger Splash (1967), depict a commonplace aspect of the city: private swimming pools. This is the final and the largest of three versions on the same theme, all based on an image that the artist found in a book about home pools. Hockney took care to keep the backdrop as flat — almost abstract — as possible, using rollers to apply the acrylic of the azure sky. The splash, in contrast, meticulously rendered with small brushes, took the artist nearly two weeks to finish. “I loved the idea of painting this thing which lasts for two seconds,” he said. “The painting took much longer to make than the splash existed for.” The result is one of the most iconic depictions of a certain upscale California lifestyle; aspirational, and perhaps more Hollywood make-believe than real.

Photographed as Part of the David Hockney Career Retrospective, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC Through February 25th, 2018.