Lee Sung-Kuen’s Interconnected at Waterfall Mansion

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected
All Photos By Gail

If you think you’ve been to every kind of cool art gallery in New York City, from the LES to Midtown, but you have not yet been to Waterfall Mansion, then now is a good time to add a visit to this uptown gem of an art destination to your bucket list. Waterfall Mansion, a Townhome only open to the public for a few hours each Saturday (and the rest of the week by appointment only) specializes in unique exhibits by Asian artists, really does have a two-story waterfall inside, but to really appreciate that distinguishing architectural feature you need to go in person.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Now through December 4th, Waterfall Mansion & Gallery presents Interconnected, the first major solo exhibition of renowned Korean artist, Lee Sung-KuenLee’s figurative works, which represent organic life and growth, are composed of thin, short-length wires and brightly colored knots.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

The netted steel volumes that he produces juxtapose the heaviness of metal and the light, creating a fluid dynamic between shape and space that both penetrates and expands the space the work inhabits.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

In an effort to harmonize material substance and immaterial space, Lee obliterates the distance between shape and space, and instead emphasizes the shifting mobility and elasticity of his pieces. In this way, the pieces do not form or become an object, but instead permeate and adapt to their surroundings, enriching the space around it and creating a unique sculpture of situation.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

The sculptures do feel very organic and can be seen as perhaps having been inspired by sea sponges and aquatic plants as well as microcosmic material.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

This cluster of three hanging sculptures reminded me of cocoons.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

The Waterfall Atrium is also filled with colorful suspended sculptures. The look a bit like jelly bean-shaped clouds.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

This piece is on the second floor and is the only one that is what I would call “representational.”

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

These look like a group of desert cacti.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

This fun exhibit is a good introduction to the Waterfall Mansion aesthetic. Try to make it uptown before the show ends on December 4th.

Waterfall Mansion and Gallery is Located at 170 East 80th Street (Between Third and Lex) in NYC. The Gallery is only open to the public on Saturdays from Noon – 5 PM, so plan accordingly. Visit This Link for more information.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected Detail

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

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Yes, It Exists: Rock Star Barbie

Rock Star Barbie
Photo By Gail

Is it really so strange that there is not only a Rock Star Barbie, but a whole gang of Barbie ‘Rockers’? Probably not. In fact, I think it is appropriate; because if Barbie can be anything she wants to be, why not be a Rocker, I ask yez? I’m actually quite surprised that it took Mattel this long to figure out that Barbie wants to Rock, Bitches! This incarnation of Rock Star Barbie (official name Careers Barbie Rock Star Doll) — which comes with a couple of thoroughly hideous outfits and a purple guitar — sells for $24.49 at Target, but I’ve seen others selling online for less. Rock on, Barbie!

Modern Art Monday: Florine Stettheimer, Portrait of Marcel Duchamp and Rrose Selavy

Portrait of Marcel Duchamp
Photo By Gail

The French Dada artist Marcel Duchamp was a member of artist Florine Stettheimer’s family’s inner circle. He is depicted here in the company of Rrose Selavy, the female alter ego that he invented in 1920. He casually carries out his game of sexual transformation by means of a contraption operated from an armchair. The clock and the chess knight are both Ducahmpian symbols: the one being a reference to the circularity of Dada time; the other an illusions to Duchamp’s prowess at chess. The frame (also by Stettheimer), composed of Duchamp’s monogram in a circle of infinite repetition, wryly comments on his program of artistic self-promotion and his obsession with identity and its ambiguities.

Portrait of Marcel Duchamp and Rrose Selavy (1923) was Photographed in the Jewish Museum in Manhattan.

Video Clip of The Week: David Myles, “Real Love”

Today, the Video Clip of The Week is excited to feature Juno Award-winning Canadian artist David Myles’ new video for his single, “Real Love” — which is the title track from Myles’ upcoming 10th studio release! Of the 13-track record, Myles confesses, “It’s a record I’ve always wanted to make . . . an upbeat, danceable, fun record that harkens back to the early days of rock ‘n roll.” Written entirely by Myles and produced by Daniel Ledwell, Real Love is a departure from the songer’s previous record in that it is fully electric.  Real Love also features members of his touring trio — Kyle Cunjak on bass and Allan Jeffries on guitar, plus Joshua Van Tassel on drums and additional vocals by Mahalia and Reeny Smith. Exciting!

Drawing from American roots music, Real Love mixes full-bodied arrangements and dance rhythms with classic rock ‘n’ roll structures. It follows 2015’s So Far, which All Music described as “a smooth, sophisticated collection of tracks,” and about which No Depression noted, “[Myles’] low-key, unassuming style ingratiates him from the first notes forward.”

David Myles

David Myles’ sound traverses musical time periods and genres, crisscrossing folk, roots, pop, jazz and country. His embrace of varied styles and tastes has resulted in numerous collaborations — most recently, with hip hop star Classified, Grammy Award-winner Alex Cuba and Quebec’s Jean Francois Brault. Real Love is due out on January 26th, 2018 via Little Tiny Records. Enjoy!

Real Love Cover

Pink Thing of The Day: Olivia Locher, I Fought The Law (Rhode Island)

I Fought The Law Rhonde Island
Photo of a Photo By Gail

Olivia Locher’s I Fought the Law is series of photographs that represent the breaking an eccentric law from each of the 50 United States. Apparently, in Rhode Island, it is illegal to wear transparent clothing.

Photographed at Steven Kasher in the Chelsea Gallery District.

MCA Beastie Boys Mural on East 7th Street

MCA Beastie Boys Mural
Photo By Gail

This nice homage to the late Adam Yauch, AKA MCA of The Beastie Boys, was spotted by me one afternoon as I was walking home. I am not sure how long it has been up, but it is at least the fifth such mural in a series created to honor Yauch, who died of cancer on May 4 2012, at age 47, that has inhabited this exact location on some kind of heavily-chained door. You can see a few of the other past murals at This Link. The artist is Cramcept. I have no idea what’s behind the door.

The Where Have You Been MCA Mural is Located on the South Side of East 7th Street Just West of First Avenue in the East Village NYC.

Eye On Design: Cabinet De Curiosité By Shiro Kuramata

Cabinet De Curiosite 2
All Photos By Gail

Shiro Kuramata (1934 – 1991) a member of The Memphis Group and among the most innovative designers of the late twentieth century, was fascinated by the visual possibilities of acrylic. The artist stated that his ideal objective was to see objects floating in air. Named for the Wunderkammern owned by Renaissance princes that displayed natural and man-made curiosities, Cabinet De Curiosité (1988) offers the magical impression of suspending its contents in midair. Kuramata explored the phenomenological effects of acrylic — light and lightness, invisibility and reflectivity, weight and weightlessness – and the material has become the poetic signature of his work. Kuramata used the term Neiro, or “sound-color,” to describe the synesthetic effect that acrylic has it both its physical presence and the spectral color-shadows it casts as light passes through it. Its prismatic luminosity changes with light and viewpoint, exploiting the optical effects of the material. Shown here alongside Flower Vase #3 (1989).

Photographed in the Met Breuer in NYC.