Facebook To Worley Gig Dot Com: Fuck You

I Dont Care
Photo By Gail

Monday morning, with zero warning or valid cause, Facebook deleted 99% of the posted content on the two fan pages I’d been maintaining on that platform (one for more than a decade) in order to promote this blog’s content to my fans and friends. To add insult to injury, they also deleted every post on my personal page that linked to content on Worleygig.com, thus completely obliterating my creative presence on Facebook. The reason given: these posts suddenly violate FB’s Terms of Service for Spam. Spam? Really? I call bullshit, but I have no method of recourse, because Facebook is not run by reasonable humans. So, I will be investigating more interesting (and likely way more effective) ways to promote Worleygig.com to those who wish to read it. Please feel free to follow me on Instagram @gailpink61 for more information going forward. Thanks, and Fuck Facebook.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Jean-Michel Basquiat, The Death of Michael Stewart

The Death of Michael Stewart 1983
Photo By Gail

At the time of his death in 1983, Michael Stewart was an aspiring young artist new to the scene, and the details of his death remain officially unsettled thirty-six years later. Stewart was arrested for allegedly writing graffiti in the First Avenue L train station in the early morning of September 15th, 1983, on his way home to Brooklyn after a night out with friends in the East Village. At around 3:30 AM, he was brought, hog-tied and comatose, by police to Bellevue Hospital, where he died thirteen hours later.

The Death of Michael Stewart (1983) represents the Basquiat’s attempt to envision Stewart’s encounter with the police that night, and pay tribute. Originally painted on a wall of Keith Haring’s Cable Building studio, laden with tags by numerous graffiti writers, Basquiat’s composition comprises three figures: two cartoonish policemen wielding their batons over the partially defined man between them. The figure, rendered in black paint, represents both Michael Stewart and the enormity of the history of violence against black bodies: it could have been any black man in the wrong place at the wrong time, in America. The word “Defacement?” hovers above the trio in the upper register, posing a question about defilement: Can the (alleged) desecration of property be an excuse for erasing a life? It is important to consider that during the 1980s, ‘defacement’ was frequently used interchangeably as a term for graffiti.

For Basquiat, who famously said about Stewart’s death, “It could have been me,” the tragedy brought to the surface his own conflicted status as a black artist in a city roiled by racial tensions and a predominantly white art world that in the early eighties was largely unengaged with the social and economic inequities of New York City. When Haring moved studios in 1985, he cut the work from the wall. In the spring or summer of 1989, he placed the painting in an ornate, gilded frame inspired by the decor of the Ritz Hotel in Paris where he often stayed. The painting hung above Haring’s bed until his death from AIDS-related complications in 1990, when it was bequeathed to his goddaughter, its current owner.

Photographed as part of the Exhibit, Basquiat’s Defacement: The Untold Story at the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.

Pink Thing Of The Day: Jigglypuff Game Prize

Jigglypuff Toy
Photos By Gail

How cute are these little guys? If you are familiar with the Pokemon species, then you know this round, pink creature is called a Jigglypuff. This past summer, Jigglypuff was available to win as a prize at various carnival games found at Coney Island’s Luna Park. This plush toy is about the size of basketball.

Jigglypuff Toy

Product Review: James Anthony Skincare Line

James Anthony Skin Care Line
All Photos By Gail

I like to think of myself as a low-maintenance babe. I’m not a slave to an elaborate make-up routine, so I want my skin to look good, even if I’m leaving the house with just a dusting of powder on my face. In NYC especially, the colder months mean harsh weather conditions combined with the drying effects of indoor heat that can wreak havoc on your complexion. To keep your skin looking as young as possible, it’s definitely worth investing in quality skincare products that will cleanse, moisturize and protect your face, so that you look fresh and youthful, with or without make up. Recently, I was given the opportunity to review a new, female-founded skincare product line called James Anthony. After a few weeks of use, these fine products have become part of my daily routine.

Jennifer Hayes, founder and CEO of James Anthony Skincare, is an industry veteran with 20 years of experience. Based on her own issues with sensitive skin, rosacea, breakouts and aging, and her frustration with a full range of products — from OTC to prescription treatments — Jennifer developed James Anthony based on a whole new way of treating, repairing and protecting the skin. Using unique Peptides and enzyme-release technology, James Anthony offers a results-driven skincare line unlike any other on the market. The dramatic effect of the peptides on the complexion offers visible results, increasing daily skin repair without irritation, while the enzyme-release technology allows for deeper penetration into the skin, ultimately better results, and less irritation than other topical skincare treatments.

These claims are impressive, sure, but I know that the only way to prove that the products really deliver the results promised is to try them. I started using the James Anthony skincare line at the beginning of October, just as the changing weather was making my complexion noticeably dry and flaky.  Below, I’ll show you each product I’m using, explain what it does, and offer my own experience. Here we go.

Come Undone Face Wash

The fist step in basic skincare is cleansing. Come Undone ($28) is gentle pH-neutral cleanser formulated to remove makeup and impurities without stripping away skin’s natural oils. Come Undone contains a probiotic and peptide complex that acts as an antimicrobial agent and an anti-inflammatory, and helps regulate defenses in the skin.

Face Wash Foam

The photo above shows how Come Undone looks when you pump one application into your palm: light and foamy.  I was skeptical that this lightweight foam was substantial enough to clean the days worth of ‘NYC atmosphere’ and make-up off of my face, because I’d been using a cleanser with a creamier, thicker consistency, but I was soon won over. The foam lathers well as you circulate it around your face with your finger tips,  and it rinses clean with just a few splashes of water. There is no need to ‘scrub’ your face, or use a washcloth, although I suppose you could use one if desired. I like the way my face feels fresh and smooth after washing it with Come Undone.

AM and PM Cream and Toner

After cleansing, you want to tone and moisturize your skin. T.L.C. toner ($28, above right) is formulated with multiple acids that work to treat and clarify skin, and probiotics that help balance skin resulting in a healthy, glowing skin tone, T.L.C (stand for Treat, Level, Clarify) is formulated to be gentle enough for daily use, but effective enough to deliver maximum results. Offering antioxidant protection, T.L.C. prepares the skin to accept skincare products that follow its application.

I’d like to point out here that since all of the James Anthony products come in well-designed packaging that employs with a “pump” delivery system (as opposed to unscrewing a cap and squeezing or pouring the product) each one dispenses just enough product to do its job, and there is no waste. I apply two to three light sprays of the T.L.C. toner on a cotton square, and it is enough to tone my entire face. I can also tell that the Come Undone cleanser has worked well because I see virtually no make-up residue on the puff after applying the toner to my skin. T.L.C. toner is non-drying and makes my skin feel tingly fresh.

Resurrect and Vivify

Next, you want to treat and moisturize. In the evening before bed, I use Resurrect P.M. Cream ($88) — a true age-reversal treatment. Resurrect is designed to treat serious aging signs with the most advanced skin technology, resulting in rejuvenated skin, even skin tone, and stimulation of the skin’s daily repair via a pro-active peptide complex. I spread one application of this lightweight serum over my face and throat, and it dries almost instantly. There is greasy feel at all and you can next apply additional moisturizer, if desired.

Vivify ($68) is a lightweight hydrating day cream formulated to repair, replenish and provide the perfect balance of moisture for healthy, glowing skin. Vivify combines key vitamins, nutrients, collagen-stimulating peptides and more for an increase in elasticity and softer, smoother, and more even skin tone. I enjoy the creamy feel of this moisturizer on my skin, and it absorbs quickly. Vivify helped to heal my flaky skin issue within a couple of days after I started using these products, and my face feels soothed after use. This is a terrific moisturizer for all skin types.

Holy Veil Sun Screen

Holy Veil Primer, SPF 35($48) is my favorite product in the line! This broad-spectrum chemical-free self-adjusting tinted sunscreen provides skin with antioxidants and essential vitamins while protecting it from the sun’s harmful rays. Used as a primer under makeup or alone, Holy Veil evens skin tone, smooths the skin, helps with flawless makeup application and helps retain the skin’s moisture for a lasting healthy glow.

I absolutely love this primer! I’ve been wearing it alone, without any added foundation, on the weekends and my skin looks amazing. Holy Veil goes on smooth like velvet, distributes evenly and seems to have an oil absorbing property because there is no shine on my face for hours after I apply it. I would compare this product to Clinique Super City Block (SPF 40) except I like Holy Veil much better.

Genie in a Bottle

The Genie in a Bottle ($98) is your secret weapon for combating extreme dryness. This maximum moisture-boosting serum instantly transforms dull, dry, damaged, and unbalanced skin into soft, radiant, balanced, beautiful and healthy skin. A multi functional serum that goes beyond basic beauty oil, Genie in a Bottle can be used whenever a nourishing moisture boost is needed and it offers rapid and deep penetration of actives for cellular regeneration, making it perfect for use on the face, neck, and hands. It can also be used on the ends of your hair, or (my favorite) massaged into dry cuticles and fingertips. You can even add a few drops to your favorite creams or lotions to boost its moisturizing benefits. Just a drop or two goes along way, and you can achieve truly miraculous results.

Smooth Move Mask

Smooth Move Mask ($58) is your once  a week go-to for exfoliating and revitalizing your skin.  Packed with ingredients such as papaya, cucumber and aloe vera, this mask instantly moisturizes and calms the face. Grapefruit and pineapple combine to remove dead skin cells, leaving the face with a hydrated glow and allowing other James Anthony Skincare products to penetrate even deeper into the skin. Smooth Move is unlike any other mask on the market.

Smooth Move Mask

Smooth Move, as you can see,  is a lovely shade of green, and its light fragrance recalls all of its natural ingredients. I like that this mask is a gently exfoliating, wash off mask, rather than one that needs to be left to dry on the face, and then peeled or washed off. If you have sensitive skin, this mask is especially ideal.

I have enjoyed discovering the benefits of using the James Anthony Skincare line and I have honestly seen benefits from each product even in a short amount of time.  I would even say that they are fun to  use, and I look forward to taking better care of my skin with these products. The entire James Anthony Skincare product line in now available online via James Anthony Skincare Dot Com. Get 20% Off your first order and check out a few sales going on right now!

Eye On Design: Brocade Evening Coat By Jeanne-Marie Lanvin

Brocade Evening Coat By Jeanne Lanvin
Installation View (Photos By Gail)

The Nazi occupation of Paris lasted from June 14, 1940 to August 25, 1944. The Nazi authorities initially planned to move the entire Paris fashion industry to the German Reich. Lucian Lelong, then head of the Chambre Syndicale, convinced them that the haute couture could only exist, “in Paris or . . . not at all.” Among those who could legally purchase Paris couture during the Occupation were some 20,000 French women (who had special couture ration cards) about 200 Germans, and citizens of neutral countries, such as Spain and Switzerland.

Jeanne-Marie Lanvin was a French haute couture fashion designer, who founded the Lanvin fashion house and the beauty and perfume company Lanvin Parfums. She designed this gray, black and gold Brocade Evening Coat in 1943.

Brocade Evening Coat By Jeanne Lanvin

Photographed as Part of The Exhibit, Paris, Capital of Fashion, On View at The Museum at FIT in Manhattan Through January 4th, 2020.

Yes, It Exists: Hello Kitty Pasta Sauce

Hello Kitty Pasta Sauce
Photos By Gail

It’s a Hello Kitty world, and we just live in it. Cost Plus World Market on 6th Avenue between 18th and 19th Streets in Manhattan just re-imagined itself as a Hello Kitty Pop Up wonderland, where Hello Kitty-themed items spread out across the entire merchandise floor, save for a very narrow perimeter of the store, where you can still find throw pillows and scented candle with the Cost Plus brand attached. There are also many step-and-repeat-style Hello Kitty selfie stations scattered throughout the store, so expect to start seeing this marketing nightmare ‘Pop Up’ all over Instagram.

Hello Kitty Pasta Sauce

The red sauce, whose label boasts that it is made from “fresh, ripe tomatoes from Napoli, Italy,” sells for $6.99 per 19.6-ounce jar.  They also sell Hello KItty-shaped dry pasta, but I am saving that for another post.

The Hello Kitty Pop Up at Cost Plus World Market will be open through the Holiday Season  into January 2020!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Asger Jorn, A Soul For Sale

A Soul For Sale
Photo By Gail

Asger Jorn (19141973) was a founding member of CoBrA, a European artists coalition active from 1948 to 1951 that emphasized material and its spontaneous application. Even after 1957, when Jorn began participating in the Situationalist International — a group of writers, artists and theorists who sought to destabilize societal practices and structures — he continued to work within the CoBrA aesthetic, as seen in A Soul For Sale (195859). With its expressive brushwork and its collapsing of foreground and background, figuration and abstraction, this painting articulates some of Jorn’s most significant interrogations of the precepts of geometric abstraction.

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.