Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Felt By Robert Morris

pink felt by robert morris 2 photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail Worley

Felt works by Robert Morris, including this piece entitled Pink Felt (1970) embody his notion of Anti-Form. Instead of executing a predetermined design, Morris allowed the final outcome of a sculpture to be determined as much by his simple actions (cutting and draping the material) as by gravity and chance.

pink felt by robert morris detail photo by gail worley
Pink Felt, Detail

A departure from earlier, unitary geometric forms of the Minimalist sculptures that the created in the 19603, Morris’s felt works, including Pink Felt, foreground the physical qualities of his materials and the artist’s physical process.

pink felt installation view photo by gail worley
Installation View

“Disengagement with preconceived enduring forms and orders for things is a positive assertion,” the artist writes in his 1968 essay, Anti Form. “It is part of the work’s refusal to continue estheticizing form by dealing with it as a prescribed end.”

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.

pink felt by robert morris photo by gail worley

A Lone Astronaut Roams Deserted Urban Landscapes in Scott Listfield’s Quarantine

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

In the early days of the Covid 19 lockdown, most of us — not just here in Manhattan but around the globe — were spending close to 24 hours a day in our homes. It was during this time that photos began appearing on the Internet and Instagram depicting places like Times Square and other generally heavily-populated ‘tourist destinations’ in states of complete abandonment. It was as if civilization as we know it had ceased to exist, and our cities been left to the elements. The world was looking more apocalyptic by the day. The only thing missing were the zombies.

scott listfield quarantine signage photo by gail worley

I thought of these images immediately when I got an email from Hashimoto Contemporary Gallery about their latest exhibition, Quarantine by artist Scott Listfield — who is known for his paintings featuring a lone exploratory astronaut lost in a landscape cluttered with pop culture icons, corporate logos and tongue-in-cheek science fiction references.

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley

The gallery is walking distance from my home, so I made an appointment to see these enigmatic and compelling paintings in person. I was the only person in the gallery at the time of my visit, which made the experience even more powerful. To say that Scott Listfield’s work encourages imaginative extrapolation is an understatement.

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley

Quarantine chronicles the adventures of the artist’s central protagonist, the lone astronaut, as he navigates a post- apocalyptic landscape reflective of our current world.

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley

Symbolic references to the Covid-19 pandemic, protests in response to the murder of George Floyd, and general unease over the American political climate abound.

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley

Protected by his helmet and suit, the astronaut explores these environments, thoughtfully observing the chaos, yet persevering.

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley

About the exhibition, Listfield Offers:

“I began working on this series of paintings while the world was in lockdown. Most of the planet was stuck at home riding out a pandemic unlike anything we’ve experienced in 100 years. City streets were empty, buildings boarded up, coyotes and tumbleweeds inhabited downtown. I began to hear from people that the real world was looking more and more like one of my paintings.

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley
Installation View

“Needless to say, this gave me pause. It’s always good as an artist to feel like you’re in the zeitgeist. It’s another thing entirely to get the uneasy feeling that you’ve predicted a fairly bleak present. I was struggling with what to do with this knowledge.

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley

“My work is very much about exploration. All I’ve had to explore recently is the darker depths of my own mind. And so in these new paintings, the astronaut that roams my work wanders through deserted cities literally tipping and falling. Where gravity has its own free will. Bits and pieces of a recognizable pop culture landscape fall through these scenes sideways, toppling along with statues.

“Things break. Things burn. But the astronaut, like us, keeps going.”

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley

Find out more about Scott Listfield, and see more of his Lonely Astronaut paintings, at This Link.

quarantine by scott listfield photo by gail worley

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Eye On Design: Gilded Wooden Bench by Thomas Hope

gilded wooden bench by thomas hope photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

A member of a wealthy banking family and sophisticated patron of the arts, Thomas Hope (17391861) set out to influence and improve contemporary taste through the publication of his own collection in Household Furniture and Interior Decoration (1807).

gilded wooden bench by thomas hope installation view photo by gail worleyInstallation View

Following interest in ancient Rome and Greece, attention turned to Egypt as a major source of inspiration for furniture and interior design. This ‘Egyptian” bench shows influence of Hope’s archeological taste and may have been part of the furnishings of his country house The Deepdene, Dorking, Surrey (outside London). It was possibly sold in the Christie’s sale of the Hope heirlooms held at Deepdene over six consecutive days in September of 1917. Lot 1044, sold on September 17th, consisted of: “a carved 4ft. 4in. gilt Egyptian pattern settee with scroll ends, on claw feet, and squab seat upholstered in gold satin damask.”

gilded wooden bench by thomas hope photo by gail worley

While several surviving pieces of furniture can be attached to the detailed line drawings, Hope never remarked on the fabrics to be used. The present wool covers are based on fiber fragments from this bench and on original textile remains from a settee also designed by Hope, which is now at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Shark Attack Tile Mosaic

shark attack tile mosaic photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

To find the Shark, you must have the Eye of The Shark! Fortunately, I possess that eye. This little guy, made from precisely-arranged, blue glass marbles, was spotted — just waiting to attack — on the sidewalk outside of The Pearl Room, a restaurant located at 8518 3rd Avenue in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Marble Bust of Mary Shelley By Camillo Pistrucci

bust of mary shelley photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

“Singularly bold, somewhat imperious, and active of mind.” This is how the radical philosopher William Godwin described his daughter, the Romantic novelist Mary Shelley, who achieved fame and infamy for her groundbreaking Gothic fiction Frankenstein (1818), written at the remarkable age of twenty-one.  Here, the Italian neoclassicist Camillo Pistrucci uses the imposing genre of the white marble portrait bust (1843) to present Shelley in the grand manner of a virtuoso. Balancing the rhythmic forms of the face and drapery with the dazzling details of her sweeping Victorian hairstyle, Pistrucci achieves a precision and finesse that betrays the influence of his father, Benedetto Pistrucci, the unrivaled cameo carver. The artist carved the bust in Rome in the year of Shelley’s Italian sojourn.

bust of mary shelley photo by gail worley
Mary Shelley (17971851)

Photographed in the British Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Pink Thing Of The Day: Pink Tent for Outdoor Dining

pink tent photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Outdoor dining during the Covid 19 pandemic has really saved New York City, not only economically but morale-wise. I love how the little temporary dining areas that restaurants have built curbside make it seem like there’s street fair going on all the time! This Pink Tent and Picket Fence was spotted on Bleecker Street in the West Village.

Product Review: Dreams Aren’t This Good Chips and Salsa!

chips and salsa photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Growing up in Southern California really ruined me for Mexican food. New York has a handful of restaurants that have game, but if you crave the consistent taste and authenticity of real California Mexican cuisine, you might be better off cooking at home. Even if you want the convenience of using a few packaged ingredients, it’s important to have a fresh-tasting salsa on hand, and what I call ‘restaurant style’ chips that are sturdy enough to stand up to the thickest guacamole. The problem is, which brands of chips and salsa taste the best? Obviously, other non-native New Yorkers have considered this situation, because fellow East Village resident Matt Bennett has created Dreams Aren’t This Good (DATG); a line of unique salsas and authentic tortilla chips that blows away everything else on the supermarket shelf. Seriously, this brand is a game changer.

dreams aren't this good salsa jar photo by gail worley
Sweet Dreams Are Made of This Salsa

Inspired by and infused with the sights and sounds of New York City, one-of-a-kind DATG salsa flavors include The Original (which I received for review), The Fighter (garlic cilantro),  Just Dance (jalapeno pineapple), Now or Never (avocado pepper), and Girls Girls Girls (blueberry coconut). All salsas and tortilla chips are gluten free, vegan and contain no preservatives.

DATG’s origin story goes back to Matt’s upbringing in Southeast Texas and his tenure as a student at Louisiana State University (LSU). “At school, I started making salsa by mixing Mexican style with a little Cajun spice,” Matt remembers.  “As I experimented with different ingredients and flavors, the salsa was always a huge hit with everyone, and I knew I was on to something.”

Review Continues, After The Jump!

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Eye On Design: Red Bakelite Bead Necklace

red bakelite bead necklace photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

This Red Bead Necklace was crafted from Bakelite (beads and chain links) cellulose acetate, with a metal clasp, and attributed to an unknown American designer. In the twentieth century, plastic manufacturing transformed the American jewelry industry and allowed for the production of fashionable yet affordable pieces. This chain link and cube necklace represents a style that was especially popular during the Depression era and the early 1940s.

red bakelite bead necklace photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Guns N’ Roses Not In This Lifetime Pinball Game Now Available Worldwide!

gnr pinball game
 
Rock and roll legends Guns N’ Roses have teamed with Jersey Jack Pinball — the American-made, #1 industry leader in pinball — to design their very own groundbreaking Guns ‘N’ Roses Not In This Lifetime pinball game. The new game elevates the beloved American pastime — which is going through a resurgence worldwide — with innovative new technology, design and sound. The Not In This Lifetime pinball game is made for players, collectors, and newcomers to pinball and is available now. Watch a sweet, sweet preview trailer at This Link!
 
An avid pinball collector and longtime player, GNR guitarist Slash worked hands-on with Jersey Jack Pinball designer Eric Meunier for over two years, to develop the Guns N’ Roses Not In This Lifetime game. As co-designer, Slash crafted specific game plays and actions, recorded guitar riffs, music, voice, and video for the new game as well as, four unique guitar features for four playable modes in the game. Eric Meunier is widely known as the designer of one of the best-selling pinball games of all time, Pirates of The Caribbean, which currently sells for $5-7,000.00 over its original asking price. With the new game offering the greatest rock and roll experience under glass, super-fans will now have a chance to own a piece of highly collectible rock and roll memorabilia.
 
Post Continues After the Jump!
 

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Emma Van Name By Joshua Johnson

emma van name by joshua johnson photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

This compelling portrait of a Baltimore toddler picking berries from a surreally-scaled goblet is an icon of the American vernacular painting. Joshua Johnson, who was self taught, is the earliest known African American painter to make his living from his art. Emma Van Name (1805) is his most ambitious and engaging portrait of an individual child. Revealing the hallmarks of Johnson’s characteristic style in its naturalistic precision and imaginative flair, the painting is distinguished by a bravura demonstration of his talents in its nuanced palette, compositional complexity, and deft handling of details, especially in the child’s dress and demeanor.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.