Let’s Go: Coney Island Summer Friday Fireworks!

Boardwalk at Dusk
All Photos By Gail

If you haven’t been out to Coney Island yet to see the Summer Fireworks, then this coming Friday, September 2nd is your last chance to experience the magic until they start again next June! So, you must plan your trip right now. Let’s go!

Nathan's

First of all, you should plan to arrive on the scene early enough so that you can get a Hot Dog and some Fries (or whatever else you like to eat) at Nathan’s. There is also a Nathan’s right on the Boardwalk, if you prefer a bumped up level of quality freak watching to that available at the original location on the corner of Surf and Stillwell Avenues. The food is exactly the same at either location.

Art Wall By Crash
Art Wall By Crash

Don’t forget to stop by the Coney Art Walls, which will be up until October!

Art Wall By Nychos
Art Wall By Nychos

Art Wall By D-Face
Art Wall By D*Face

Snow Cone Stand

While you stroll along the Boardwalk, stop by this Snow Cone Stand and treat yourself to an additional refreshment!

View of Boardwalk from Sand

Even if you are going to pass on checking out any of the Luna Park rides, because you have just eaten at Nathan’s and do not want to barf,  it is wonderful just to look at everything when it is all lit up against the night sky. Head out to the sand early and watch all of the action from the beach, while you listen to the delighted screams and shrieks from people on the rides! Wee!

Scream Zone

Wonder Wheel

Oh, the beautifulness.

Parachute Jump at Night

Now it is 9:30 PM, and time for the Fireworks to begin! Lets go to the video!

The full show lasts much longer than 2 minutes, but you get the idea.

Luna Park at Night

Williams Candy Shop

And then stop by Williams Candy Shop on the way to the train to pick up a sweet treat to take home! What a fun adventure!

Find out more about the Coney Island Fireworks, as well as other fun stuff to do on your visit, at This Link!

Red Wheel

Eye On Design: Apple Jack Ladder By Karen Kjaegaard

Apple Jack Ladder
Photo By Gail

If you happen to be lucky enough to visit the Danish city of Copenhagen, don’t miss your chance to make a very fun visit to their fantastic Designmuseum, which is where I saw this super modern ladder designed by Karen Kjaegaard. The space-saving, bright red lacquered Apple Jack Ladder was part of Kjaegaard’s My Private Garden exhibit, which took place at the Designmuseum in 2005. The ladder is manufactured by Trip Trap. Read more about the My Private Garden exhibit at This Link!

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present at the Guggenheim NY

Moholy-Nagy Three Globes
All Photos By Gail. All Text By The Guggenheim Museum

László Moholy-Nagy (b. 1895, Borsód, Austria-Hungary; d. 1946, Chicago) believed in the potential of art as a vehicle for social transformation, working hand in hand with technology for the betterment of humanity. A restless innovator, Moholy-Nagy experimented with a wide variety of mediums, moving fluidly between the fine and applied arts in pursuit of his quest to illuminate the interrelatedness of life, art, and technology. An artist, educator, and writer who defied categorization, he expressed his theories in numerous influential writings that continue to inspire artists and designers today.

Moholy-Nagy 4 Pictures

Moholy-Nagy Plastic Form

Walter Gropius invited him to join the faculty at the Bauhaus school of art and design, where Moholy-Nagy taught in Weimar and Dessau in the 1920s. In 1937, he was appointed to head the New Bauhaus in Chicago; he later opened his own School of Design there (subsequently renamed the Institute of Design), which today is part of the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Moholy-Nagy

Moholy-NagyAmong Moholy-Nagy’s radical innovations were his experiments with camera-less photographs (which he dubbed photograms); his unconventional use of industrial materials in painting and sculpture; experiments with light, transparency, space, and motion across mediums; and his work at the forefront of abstraction, as he strove to reshape the role of the artist in the modern world. Moholy-Nagy: Future Present features paintings, sculptures, collages, drawings, prints, films, photograms, photographs, photomontages, projections, documentation, and examples of graphic, advertising, and stage design drawn from public and private collections across Europe and the United States.

Manifesto

Room of The Present

On display in the museum’s High Gallery is Room of the Present (Raum der Gegenwart), a contemporary fabrication of an exhibition space conceived of by Moholy-Nagy in 1930, but not realized in his lifetime.

Room of The Present

Light Prop for an Electric Stage
Light Prop for an Electric Stage

On view for the first time in the United States, the large-scale work contains photographic reproductions and design replicas as well as his kinetic Light Prop for an Electric Stage (Lichtrequisit einer elektrischen Bühne, 1930; recreated 2006). Room of the Present illustrates Moholy-Nagy’s belief in the power of images and the significance of the various means with which to view and disseminate them — a highly relevant paradigm in today’s constantly shifting and evolving technological world.

Room of The Present

Interior Elevation

This is a massive retrospective with lots to see and learn about the genius of László Moholy-Nagy. Here are a few more photos from this must-see show!

Three Pictures Black Backgrounds

Two Pictures

Ad From London Underground
Ad For The London Underground Circa 1936 – 37

Moholy-Nagy

Moholy-Nagy Pins Detail
Detail from Above Work

Moholy-Nagy

László Moholy-Nagy is a central figure in the history of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. In 1929, Solomon R. Guggenheim and his advisor, German-born artist Hilla Rebay, began collecting his paintings, works on paper, and sculpture in depth for the Guggenheim’s growing collection of nonobjective art. His work held a special place at the Museum of Non-Objective Painting — the forerunner of the Guggenheim Museum — where a memorial exhibition was presented shortly after his untimely death in 1946.

Moholy-Nagy

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present Runs Through September 7th, 2016 at the Guggenheim Museum, Located at 1071 Fifth Ave at 89th Street, NYC.

Moholy Nagy Gift Shop

Modern Art Monday Presents: Why Not Sneeze, Rose Sélavy? By Marcel Duchamp

Why Not Sneeze
All Photos By Gail

Why Not Sneeze, Rose Sélavy? is a 1921 Readymade sculpture by Marcel Duchamp. Duchamp considered this to be an “Assisted Readymade” because the original object, the Birdcage, was altered by the artist with the addition of the other objects. These consist of 152 white cubes (made of marble but resembling sugar cubes), a mercury thermometer, a piece of cuttlebone, and a tiny porcelain dish.

Why Not Sneeze

The birdcage is made of painted metal and contains several wooden perches. Rrose Sélavy, or Rose Sélavy, was one of the pseudonyms used by artist for the creation of other works, such as This One.

Why Not Sneeze

The Philadelphia Museum of Art displays the original as part of the Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection. Several replicas made by Duchamp exist (this is one, from 1964, of those) but only in the original are the cubes stamped “Made in France.”

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Why Not Sneeze

Video Clip of The Week: Bleeker, Highway

While my days of hypersexual girl-fandom are far behind me, I’ve still got a pulse. One look at this week’s featured Video Clip, “Highway” from Canadian power-trio Bleeker, prompts me to declare that these three hot young guys playing some seriously hook-sharp rock should be out there stealing the fans away from Justin Beiber and similar nad-less dweebs at a fairly steady clip. I mean, why not? Come on ladies, get with the program!

The wildly exuberant video for “Highway” features a collection of behind-the-scenes and live footage from the band’s recent tour as well as day-to-day life for  vocalist Taylor Perkins, Guitarist Cole Perkins (yes they are brothers) and Bassist Mike Van Dyk. Aurally, Bleeker valiantly hijacks blues-based rock, infusing it with a rousing power pop energy mixed with a visceral rock swagger that just can’t be denied. Simply stated, this band is hot stuff!

“Highway” is the featured single off the Bleeker’s debut self-titled EP, which has already racked up over 500k streams on Spotify,  and garnered radio play on stations in the U.S. (KRXP, KFMA, WBUZ), Canada (HTZ FM, The Wolf), and Germany – wow! Those Germans: they love the Rock.  Like Bleecker — and find out when they are touring — on the FaceBook at This Link! Enjoy!

Bleeker Band

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Brainwashed: New Works and Old Favorites By Mr. Brainwash at Taglialatella Galleries

Installation View with Horse
All Photos By Gail

You might recall that last summer we made three or four unsuccessful attempts (before finally lucking out with our timing) to see the massive Mr. Brainwash Life is Beautiful pop-up exhibit, which was located under the High Line at 14th Street for a few months. Seriously, that shit was just never, ever open.

New York Word

Fortunately, this summer’s Mr. Brainwash “Happening” is at a legitimate art gallery with a real address and clearly-posted hours of operation and everything! Yay! In fact, Brainwashed, which opened at Taglialatella Galleries on August 18th, unofficially christened the gallery’s new two-level, 5,000 square foot space at 229 Tenth Avenue, adjacent to its long-time home at 231Tenth Avenue (between 23rd and 24th). The new space is being treated as a pop-up venue until the gallery takes over full occupation of the new building in November.

Smile
Smile!

Cold beverages for the evening were provide by Stella Artois, who has partnered with the gallery for future events, to make sure we can get a buzz on while enjoying the art! Stella!

Stella Artois Print

The Stella Artois brand identity could be seen on various exhibited artworks, and the new collection also features an exclusive, limited-edition Stella Artois print, available only at Taglialatella Galleries.

Beatles 1965
Beatles 1965

Beatles 1966
Beatles 1966

Hey look: Brainwash is still making portraits of (mostly dead) Rock Stars from bits of broken vinyl records. It. Never. Gets. Old.

Bucket Heart
Bucket Heart

Here’s what’s great about a Mr. Brainwash exhibit: Just because we’ve seen it all before doesn’t mean it’s not fun to see it all again! Also: free alcohol!

Maxspray
Maxspray

This piece references the classic ’80s Maxell Tape ad (the UK version of which featured Peter Murphy of Bauhaus – TRIVIA!) and mashes it up with the iconic Brainwash-ala-Warhol Campbell’s Soup Spray Can. So. Many. Influences.

Pink Kate Moss
Pink Kate Moss

It’s interesting to note that this sparkly portrait of Supermodel  Kate Moss veryvery closely resembles the work of Russell Young, who’s also occasionally represented by Taglialatella.

Marilyn
Marilyn

Even though I could easily live without ever, ever again seeing this ubiquitous portrait of Marilyn Monroe appropriated and recycled for the million-billionth time by any artist, I do like the soft pastel colors on this version. He has another with colors that recall the cover of that Police album, the title of which I am too lazy to look-up. You know the one I am talking about, though.

David Bowie
David Bowie as Aladdin Sane

Bowie, yeah, I like it.

More Art Upstairs

There’s More Art Upstairs! Also, Pinkness!

Brainwash Kitchen

Someone needs to give this kitchen a good scrubbing.

Mickey and Lennon

Mickey Mouse made of recycled vintage tin signage. Just behind him, John Lennon gets another vinyl record treatment.

Stella Spray

Brainwashed will run through October 16th, 2016.

Store Front