Tag Archives: musical instruments

Why Choose an Acoustic-Electric Violin?

electric acoustic violin
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In the music industry, singers and songwriters also invest in choosing and buying high-quality instruments. According to some research, knowing how to play a musical instrument can enhance an individual’s tune. Aside from that, it also enhances your brain functions.

Continue reading Why Choose an Acoustic-Electric Violin?

Eye On Design: F-4B Electric Bass By Born To Rock

F4B Aluminum Bass Guitar
Photos By Gail

The Born To Rock F-4B Electric Bass (1995) has a patented design with the following specifications:

Hollow aluminum-tube-frame body

One piece ‘headless’ Plexiglas neck and fingerboard

34 Inch scale

Precision bass-style split coil-pickup with volume and tone controls

The bass relies on a lightweight frame that holds the strings at tension over a tension-free neck, which avoids the warping associated with wooden instruments. Since the open, skeletal design has no conventional headstock, the tuners are mounted below the bridge at the bottom of the body. This bass guitar belongs to Steve Miller.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Play It Loud: Instruments of Rock & Roll at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

F4B Aluminum Bass Guitar Installation View
Installation View

Eye On Design: Keith Emerson’s Moog Synthesizer

Keith Emerson Moog Synthesizer
Photos By Gail

In the mid-1960s, electric music pioneer Robert Moog created modular synthesizers using transistor technologies. His early synths featured modules that generate and modify the pitch, timbre, and volume of sounds when connected, or “patched” by cables. This allowed for unprecedented control of sonic parameters but made it difficult to replicate the same sound twice. Moog’s inventions came to the attention of the rock world when they were demonstrated at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967. The following year, Wendy Carlos’s album Switched-On Bach became the first chart-topping hit utilizing a Moog synthesizer. The instrument has its performance debut at a 1969 concert in the Sculpture Garden at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC, where Moog introduced a quartet of synthesizers built specifically for live events.

Inspired by Wendy Carlos, Keith Emerson of the then-new band Emerson, Lake and Palmer sought out one of the synthesizers that Robert Moog had built for the 1969 concert at MoMA. The band’s 1970 hit single, Lucky Man,” with an expansive Moog solo by Emerson, helped to establish the synthesizer as a lead instrument in popular music. Emerson collaborated with Moog to expand the synthesizer and optimize it for live performance, adding additional components and preset modules that recall sounds.

Hammond L-100 Organ with Moog Synthesizer
Installation View: Moog Synthesizer with Emerson’s Hammond L-100 Stunt Keyboard (Left

Photographed as Part of Play It Loud: Instruments of Rock and Roll, on Exhibit at The Metropolitan Museum Art in NYC Through October 1st, 2019.

David Gilmour’s Guitar Collection Going Up For Auction at Christie’s!

David Gilmour Guitar Collection at Christies
All Photos By Gail

In a career spanning more than five decades — as guitarist, singer and songwriter of Pink Floyd, and in his solo recordings  and collaborations with other artists — David Gilmour has created a body of work that cements his legacy as one of the most influential rock musicians  of all time. If you’ve ever wondered what it might be like to play one of Gilmour’s guitars, wonder no longer. Christie’s is preparing to bring to auction highlights from David Gilmour’s personal guitar collection on June 20th, 2019 in New York. Comprising more than 120 guitars, Gilmour’s collection focuses on a selection of his preferred Fender models including Broadcasters, Esquires, Telecasters and Stratocasters, led by a guitar as iconic and recognizable as the historic performances for which it was used – the 1969 Black Stratocaster (estimate: $100,000-150,000). Continue reading David Gilmour’s Guitar Collection Going Up For Auction at Christie’s!

Sergio Romagnolo’s Red Plastic Drumkit

Red Plastic Drum Kit Front View
All Photos By Gail

It’s been nearly ten years since my gig writing for Modern Drummer magazine came to an unceremonious end, but I still get nostalgic when I see a work of art that pays homage to the drums. Check out this crazy kit by Brazilian artist Sergio Romagnolo, which is made from hand-molded, headed plastic.

Red Plastic Drumkit Side View

Here’s the kit shot from an angle that let’s you see the finer sculpture details, as the plastic dripping down from the rack-mounted toms onto the bass drum.

Red Plastic Drumkit Rear View

The full sculpted kit is comprised of a kick, or bass, drum, two rack-mounted toms, one floor tom, one snare drum, what is either meant to be a ride or crash cymbal, and one hi-hat cymbal, both on stands. The only crucial thing he left out — besides the hi-hat and bass drum pedals —  is the drum stool. Perhaps that feature was omitted to keep would-be drummers from sitting down and trying to play it!

Sergio Romagnolo Red Plastic Drumkit Detail

If you look closely, you will notice that Sergio has added small Red Rose, which is visible between the two mounted toms! In fact that is no accident, as the official title of the piece is Drums With Flower (2019). This artist prefers to create sculptures that explore the urban and industrial universe, such as cars, buildings, airplanes, cameras, and trash cans.

Red Plastic Drumkit Installation View

In the above installation view, you can see works by two other Brazilian artists: a painting by Jose Leonilson on the wall, and a reflective sculpture by Vanderlei Lopes on the carpet, foreground.

Photographed at the Frieze Art Fair, 2019, in the Booth for Galeria Marilia Razuk of Sao Paolo, Brazil.

Red Drum Kit