Tag Archive | Mobile

Eye On Design: A to Z 1993 Living Unit By Andrea Zittel

A to Z Living Unit
All Photos By Gail

The A to Z Living Unit (1993) designed by Andrea Zittel (B. 1965) is fabricated from Steel and Wood, and is shown here with the following accessories:

Two mirrors, four hangers, sweater, towel, soap container, calendar, filing cabinet, pencils, two notepads, folding seat, folding bed, four glass jars, two ceramic cups, two glasses, two ceramic bowls, digital clock, electric lightning system, hot plate, pot, and toaster oven.

A to Z Living Unit

The Living Unit is a modular, portable living environment that includes a place to sleep, a modest kitchen, and storage — the essentials of daily life.  Inspired by the limitations of her own 200-square-foot Brooklyn studio, Zittel began work on a series of functional living units that could be customized to meet individual needs and shape behavior according to different ideals.

A to Z Living Unit

Interested in what she describes as the “fine line between freedom and control, and how people often feel liberated by parameters,” Zittel’s living units can be viewed as simultaneously constraining in their austerity, and freeing in their utopian rejection of materialism.

A to Z Living Unit

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Man Ray, Obstruction

Man Ray Obstruction
All Photos By Gail

Man Ray (1890 – 1976) worked in a wide variety of media, including photography, painting, and sculpture, often blurring the boundaries between these practices. Obstruction, an assemblage of 63 wooden coat hangers, is an example of the type of artwork Dada artist Marcel Duchamp called a Ready-Made, a term that suggests Man Ray’s appropriation and manipulation of pre-existing, common objects. The sculpture playfully mimics a chandelier, but, as the hangers seemingly divide and multiply, Obstruction quickly evolves into a dense tangle of overlapping forms. Cast shadows serve as distorted, immaterial extensions of its physical presence. Man Ray first created Obstruction in 1920, but the present work belongs to an addition of 15 reproductions that he created in 1961 for an important exhibition of kinetic art.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Man Ray Obstruction

Video: Tim Hawkinson’s Gimbled Klein Basket at Pace Gallery



Artist Tim Hawkinson explores the fourth dimension with his 2007 Gimbled Klein Basket, which creates an analog rendering of an impossible object. With a porous, gridded bamboo structure, Hawkins then recreated the Klein Bottle and suspended it from the ceiling like a Calder mobile, envisioning an object which is at once knowable, and of another dimension. This video was created at the Pace Gallery on W. 25th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, as part of the Eureka exhibit, which has now closed.

Mobile Ski Boots from Frieze Art Fair 2014

Mobile Ski Boots
Photos By Gail

Hey check out these awesome Mobile Ski Boots! As I was making my hit-and-run tour of Frieze Art Fair 2014 I neglected to note the name of the artist who sealed this pair of ski boots in blocks of concrete and mounted each to the base of a rolling task chair — which is too bad because, clever!

I understand that at one point these boots were strapped to the feet of a willing victim, who then rolled around on them across the exhibit floor. I wish I had seen that.

Imagine how much it would hurt if you had these things strapped on and you had really gained some speed and then you just wiped out. Wow. Instant Nose Job.

Mobile Ski Boots Booth View

Here is a better view of the booth. If anyone knows who the artist is, please leave it in the comments, thanks!

Art on Art at Adam Baumgold Gallery

Suicide By Modernism By Mark Kostabi (2005/2011) Photo By Geoffrey Dicker

The Adam Baumgold Gallery on New York’s Upper East Side is currently hosting a group show called Art on Art, in which each artist references other artists or artworks in his or her own creation. This makes for a diverse collection full of humorous touches that inspired a lot of lively conversation at last night’s opening. My favorite painting in the exhibit is Mark Kostabi’s Suicide by Modernism, which has the artist’s unmistakable imprint while managing to reference nearly a dozen of his famous peers. Suicide By Modernism very cleverly depicts one of Kostabi’s iconic figures hanging limp from the arm of an Alexander Calder mobile, from which highly recognizable works by Piet Mondrian, Takashi Murakami, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Mark Rothko and Yves Klein also dangle. Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel sculpture appears, overturned, in the painting’s foreground. Mark Kostabi was at the opening party and he seems like a really cool guy. It was nice to be able to shake his hand and tell him how much I loved this painting in particular, and his work in general. Mark Kostabi!

You can read the exhibit press release and see a preview of many of the included paintings, drawings and sculptures online at Adam Baumgold Gallery Dot Com. I’d recommend making the trip uptown, however, to see the works in person, and make sure you take a walk up or down Park Avenue while you’re in the neighborhood to see Will Ryman’s “Roses” sculpture installation (57th to 67 Streets on the Avenue’s central traffic island), which are just amazing, and on display only until May 31st.

Art on Art runs through June 25, 2011, at Adam Baumgold, located at 60 East 66th Street (Between Park and Madison Avenues) in NYC. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 11:00 AM to 5:30 PM. For additional information, please contact Adam Baumgold at (212) 861-7338, or email abaumgold@aol.com.