Tag Archive | Singer/Songwriter

Video Clip of The Week: Madison Daniel, “Love Is Love”


It is not in any way a bold statement that, in these times especially, there is no shortage of outlets where we can focus our positive energy and action. The world needs love, and it should not matter what that love looks like or what shape it takes. Bluntly put, we have more grievous issues to deal with than attempting to restrict an individual’s right to love whomever they choose. If you do not already get that, watch this simply beautiful new video from 20-year old Australian artist Madison Daniel for her song “Love Is Love,” and then tell me that it does not move you to soften your heart. I’ll wait.

Already a commercial hit in Australia, “Love Is Love” officially made its US debut by way of Spotify, and now via this inspiring music video. “Love Is Love” delves into why we as human beings need to rid ourselves and our world of judgement and bias, and allow our fellow human beings to love as they wish. The song was originally written by Madison in celebration of the legalization of same-sex marriage in Australia, an issue near and dear to the artist’s heart, but its message is worldwide and certainly relevant to the US political climate.

Follow Madison Daniel on Instagram at @Madsee. Enjoy!

Madison Daniel

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Video Clip of The Week: David Poe, “When I Fly”

David Poe – When I Fly from David Poe on Vimeo.

I’m really excited about this week’s clip, “When I Fly” by singer/songwriter David Poe, an artist I first wrote about way back in 1996. Poe’s music reminded me then of serious 1970s-era performers like James Taylor but also Art Garfunkel and the great Tim Moore (who, as far as I know is still alive, but hasn’t recorded an album in almost 30 years, WTF?). Anyway, “When I Fly” reveals evidence of those same types of seventies-ish influences. This says two things to me: 1. That, musically, David Poe knows his shit, and 2. Poe understands that if it works, don’t fix it.

Thematically, “When I Fly” is a 2014 version of Norman Greenbaum’s “Spirit in the Sky.” If you know what that means, great. If not, it doesn’t matter. Aurally, the song is an acoustic guitar accompanying pristine word economy in a song that anyone who has lived a life will be able to relate to. Visually, this clip looks like the home movies of someone who has had an awesome life. I know that “Lyric Videos” are all the rage these day and usually they put me off, but I like this one. Pay special attention towards the end for a montage of subliminal images that includes Ronnie James Dio. Excellent

“When I Fly”
is from the not yet released album God & The Girl, which David calls “a quiet record of new songs I recorded last year in Los Angeles.” The full album will not be generally available online or in stores until much later this year, but for now, it’s available exclusively through his website, accessible by clicking This Link. Purchase, Download, Listen and Enjoy!

David Poe CD Cover

Recommended Listening: Kurt Vile, Wakin’ On a Pretty Daze

Kurt Vile Wakin On A Pretty Daze CD Cover
Album Cover Art By Steve Powers!

When it comes to modern music, not much impresses me these days. If you look back over the past few years at any Top 10 Albums list I might have compiled – in those years where I was even able to cobble together such a list at all – you’ll see it’s comprised partly of comeback records by classic rockers, greatest hits packages or tribute albums that revisit the material of a legendary artist. That’s rather pathetic, I know, for a writer who once embraced the tagline ‘Rock Critic at Large,’ but it is what it is. I don’t apologize for being unable to shake the feeling that the best years for popular music are, for the most part, 30 – or even 40 – years behind us.

It if it weren’t for Australia’s Tame Impala, who’ve managed to harness a sound comparable to Led Zeppelin on downers, or Canada’s The Sheepdogs, who pay homage to the seventies better than most bands did back in the ‘70s, there probably wouldn’t be one new band I could name in the past few years whose records gave me any kind of a thrill at all. And then there’s an enigma like Kurt Vile; a singer/songwriter/guitarist whose Murmur-esque vocal delivery is coupled with an amazing finesse for musical arrangements and an ability to turn a phrase that rivals Bob Dylan or Leonard Cohen. On Wakin’ On a Pretty Daze, his follow-up to 2011′s brilliant Smoke Ring for My Halo, Vile once again completely and totally blows my mind.

In search of a contemporary reference, I’d say that Kurt Vile keeps company with fellow singer/songwriter and innovator Joseph Arthur, who possesses an equal gift for infusing seductive aural melancholia with an exhilarating emotional transcendence. Like Arthur, Vile’s lyrics are wickedly introspective and his knack for finely tuned word economy is juxtaposed with jam-heavy arrangements that indicate Vile is in no hurry to get where he’s going. The nine-minute-plus title track launches the disc with Vile’s countrified acoustic strumming that carry his dreamlike musings about what might be in store for the next 18 or so waking hours, as circular guitar patterns draw the listener deeply into the artist’s head. In fact, “Head Music” is not an entirely inappropriate label for these eleven aural journeys that play out over the course of a full, blissful hour.

And just in case you drifted away, the comparatively strident opening chords of “KV Crimes” jolts you back to consciousness before the hand percussion-driven, traveling rhythm of “Was All Talk” swallows you whole with its limitless gorgeousness. Over five albums worth of material, I don’t know if Vile has written a better song than this. “There was a time in my life when they thought I was all talk,” is such an exquisitely personal fuck you to naysayers, while remaining ambiguous enough to allow the listener to adopt the song as his or her own anthem of self realization. And when he sings, “Making music is easy – watch me,” one could believe that this song effortlessly flowed right through Vile. Seriously, when it comes to amazing songwriting, “Was All Talk” is right up there with “All The Young Dudes” and “Shake Some Action.” The fact that Vile lets a song that could have been neatly wrapped up in three and a half minutes continue on for over seven makes it all the more bittersweet when it finally comes to an end.

What’s most amazing about Wakin On A Pretty Daze is that every song on the record is that good. Each track packs a jaw-dropping Oh Wow Factor that makes my head explode. “Girl Called Alex” mines the minor chord gloom in a way that recalls a meatier version of Mazzy Star’s “Fade Into You” or Dylan’s “Knocking On Heaven’s Door.” Showcasing Vile’s flair for changing up arrangements, “Pure Pain” alternates between what I’d call a baroque stomp and a waltz. The remaining tracks could be summed up as follows: great, great, great, great, great. I recommend you pick up a copy of Wakin’ On A Pretty Daze and start developing your own relationship with a disc that I am just going to go ahead and call the Album of The Year.

Grade: A+