Tag Archive | Barry Lyndon

Stanley Kubrick Retrospective at LA County Museum of Art

 LACMA Kubrick Exhibit Title

While I was in Califorina over the Christmas holdays I was fortunate to be able to check out the Stanley Kubrick Career Retrospective at LACMA – which was just amazing! I absolutley loved the exhibit and took a bunch of pictures, some of which I’ll share with you in this post.

As the museum’s website concisely describes the exhibit: “Stanley Kubrick was known for exerting complete artistic control over his projects; in doing so, he reconceived the genres in which he worked. The exhibition covers the breadth of Kubrick’s practice, beginning with his early photographs for Look magazine, taken in the 1940s, and continuing with his groundbreaking directorial achievements of the 1950s through the 1990s. His films are represented through a selection of annotated scripts, production photography, lenses and cameras, set models, costumes and props.

Kubrick Posters Wall
A Selection of Posters and Lobby Cards from Kubrick’s Films

In addition, the exhibition explores Napoleon and The Aryan Papers, two projects that Kubrick never completed, as well as the technological advances developed and utilized by Kubrick and his team. By featuring this legendary film auteur and his oeuvre as the focus of his first retrospective in the context of an art museum, the exhibition reevaluates how we define the artist in the 21st century, and simultaneously expands upon LACMA’s commitment to exploring the intersection of art and film.”

Below is a selection of my photos from the show, representative of an overview of the exhibit. Enjoy!

Kubrick Strangelove Model
Miniature Boardroom Set from Dr. Strangelove

Kubrick 2001 Seating
Seating from 2001: A Space Odyssey. Production Stills at Rear of Gallery.

Kubrick 2001 Cutlery Props
Custom Designed Futuristic Cutlery used in 2001.

Kubrick 2001 Space Ship Model
Spaceship Model from 2001

Kubrick 2001 Model Set
2001 Miniature Model Set

Kubrick Barry Lyndon Costumes

Kubrick’s epic period drama, Barry Lyndon, is represented mostly by its lavish costumes. Barry Lyndon is a fantastic film if you have three hours to devote to a viewing.

Kubrick Spartacus Costume
Costume from Spartacus

Kubrick Clockwork Milkbar Props

Signage and Props from the Korovoa Milk Bar scene in A Clockwork Orange — My favorite movie of all time!

Kubrick Clockwork Orange Droog Costume

Droog Costume worn by Malcom McDowell as Alex, A Clockwork Orange. Notice the skewed shadow of the baton against the wall.

 Kubrick Clockwork Orange Turntable

Alex’s Turntable.  Trivia: the British band Heaven 17 took their name from the pre-orgy record store scene in this film.

Kubrick Shining Production Stills

The Shining Production Stills. Note the emphatic use of the color red, which Kubrick employed in each of his films to heighten the emotional impact of certain scenes.

Kubrick Shining Hedge Maze Miniature

The Shining Hedge Maze Model

Kubrick Shining Room Wall with Axes

The Shining’s Grady Sisters with Axes buried in the gallery wall.

Kubrick EWS Masks

Masks from Eyes Wide Shut

Kubrick AI Set Rendering

AI Set Rendering

Kubrick Hellacopter Model from Full Metal Jacket
Helicopter Model from Full Metal Jacket

Stanley Kubrick Runs Through June 30, 2013 in the Art of the Americas Building, Level 2 at LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036. Admission to the Exhibit, which includes Admission to all Galleries, is $20.00. Tickets can be purchased online at This Link.

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Robert Pattinson Goes from Undead to Unwashed for Bel Ami

Christina Ricci and Robert Pattinson in Bel Ami
Christina Ricci and Robert Pattinson Star in Bel Ami (Images Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures)

If you loved Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon – the epic period drama about a beguiling rogue who manipulates (read: boinks) his way to the top of 18th century European society – but would prefer to skip all of those gory battle scenes and have the run time cut down from three hours to an economical 100 minutes, you might enjoy a new film called Bel Ami.

Based on the 1885 French eponymous novel by Guy de Maupassant (with a screenplay by Rachel Bennette) Bel Ami is directed by the team of Declan Donnellan and Nick Ormerod. Robert Pattinson (best known for his roles as vampire Edward Cullen from the Twilight film franchise) stars as Georges Duroy, a young, impoverished former soldier who moves to Paris in the 1890s to, literally, seek his fortune. Living in squalor and unemployed, Georges has a chance reunion with Charles Forestier (Philip Glenister), an acquaintance from his time in the military, and sufficiently charms his way not only into a job as a journalist but also into Forestier’s inner social /political circle. Forestier’s beautiful and well-educated wife, Madeleine (Uma Thurman), introduces Georges to her good friends Clotilde (Christina Ricci) and Virginie (Kristin Scott Thomas), both married, but ripe for distraction. Georges wastes no time in taking full advantage of Clotilde’s obvious attraction to him. The two embark on a a smoldering affair, which is the Georges’ first major seduction – his preferred method for bringing about the cooperation/ruination of anyone who would stand in the way of his quest for fame, riches and glory.

Robert Pattinson and Uma Thurman in Bel Ami
Robert Pattinson and Uma Thurman in Bel Ami

As the strong willed but appropriately vulnerable Madeleine (who eventually becomes Georges’ first wife), Uma Thurman steals every scene she is in. Her character’s insistence on maintaining her social and financial equality with the duplicitous Georges (who is unlikeable in almost every way and looks like he needs a bath in nearly every scene) also makes her the film’s most admirable / sympathetic character. What I found so engaging about Bel Ami was observing the manner in which Georges’ single-minded ambition becomes increasingly ruthless while remaining largely surreptitious.

To give up much more of the plot here would mean revealing “spoilers,” and this film is one that needs to unfold for the viewer on its own. Costumes, art direction and the original classical soundtrack (composed by Rachel Portman) are all first-rate and add authenticity to the film’s setting. The acting is excellent by all female leads and while the jury is still out on R Patz, he successfully portrays Georges as a vacuous but hard-hearted individual who is able to successfully use people as his means to an end because they are so easily able to project their emotions and desires onto his conscienceless, blank canvas of a persona. If I said I’d never met an individual like Georges in my own life, I’d be lying.

Bel Ami (Rated R for Sex and Nudity) opens Friday, June 8th 2012 at Sunshine Cinema 5, located at 143 East Houston Street, New York, NY.