Tag Archive | Novel

Geoffrey Dicker Publishes Outrageous First Novel, Journal of Grievances

Geoffrey Dicker Journal of Grievances
Image Courtesy of Geoffrey Dicker

Full Disclosure: If you are an avid fan of Worleygig.com, you are aware that Geoffrey Dicker is my BFF/Partner In Crime, and that we have experienced many, many crazyfun adventures together; most of which are documented with photographic evidence right on this very blog! So, you already know that Geoffrey is one rad dude whose devil-may-care attitude carries over into every facet of his ass-kick in his life. Good for him, I say! Good for everybody!

With that introduction, it is my pleasure to announce the publication of Journal of Grievances, Geoffrey’s latest book and first novel! Warning: this book is recommended for immature audiences only, as it is riddled with ridiculous amounts of adult language and thoroughly twisted situations. Journal of Grievances is a ‘raw and uncensored’ look into the controversial ups and downs (both in and out of the bedroom) of a struggling, single gay male writer living in New York City!

Told through daily journal entries in a year-long approach to turning The Big Four-Oh, the Journal’s protagonist spills his guts with hilarious observations as he waxes philosophically: analyzing his raunchy sex life, drug addictions, debauched relationships, life encounters, and his frustrations with society. With razor-sharp prosaic hooks and brutal honesty, our narrator navigates through relationship drama and job-loss as he struggles to find his place in the world. Or maybe not.

Geoffrey suggests that if you are easily offended by profanity or graphic depictions of gay sex, please do not buy this book. Alternately, he advises the reader to flip to any page and promises that within 2 sentences, he or she will be laughing. “I’d like to think of this book as a gay loner version of Sex and the City meets Curb Your Enthusiasm meets Catcher in the Rye — in other words, it’s completely fucked up!”  Journal of Grievances is an unconventional coming-of-age story with no filters and absolutely zero fucks given!  The supporting characters in the story remain nameless, because what matters is how their words and actions affect our anti-hero. “Despite the story containing generous helpings of extreme gay sex,” Dicker continues, “I think the anyone – straight or gay –  will be able to relate to the situations and moral dilemmas in which the main character often finds himself.”

“I’ve read so many books that never teach me anything new, make me think differently, or, at the very least, make me smile, Dicker continues. Journal of Grievances will bring each of these experiences to the reader, hopefully repeatedly. There are 11 months of daily journal entries, and one month’s entries made up of random ideas; including a short story told almost exclusively via use of the F-word.” Ant any rate, he promises, “You’ll never be the same again, after reading Journal of Grievances!”

Journal of Grievances is Released Today, September 20th, 2016, and is Available to Purchase From Amazon at This Link!

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Yes, It Exists: God, I Don’t Even Know Your Name, The Novel

God, I Don’t Even Know Your Name
All Photos By Gail

Eva is a hot mess. When her promising art career in New York takes a plunge, she enters rehab and finds sobriety—but not peace of mind. She escapes to Europe and loses herself in one hook up after another using Bangly, the newest dating app. She meets a run-of-the-mill Finnish curator and thinks it’s love. Or is it just wanderlust?

God, I Don’t Even Know Your Name by Andrea McGinty is the third installment of New Lovers, a series of short erotic fiction published by Badlands Unlimited. Inspired by Maurice Girodias’ legendary Olympia Press, New Lovers features the raw and uncut writings of authors new to the erotic romance genre. Each story has its own unique take on relationships, intimacy, and sex, as well as the complexities that bedevil contemporary life and culture today.

Each novella in the New Lovers series is an independent story of about 12,000 – 18,000 words in length. God, I Don’t Even Know Your Name is a Eurotrip of epic sexual and artistic proportions with stunning locales, a myriad of men, and one undeniably resilient heroine.

The design of New Lovers pays homage to the classic covers of the books published by Olympia Press. The “soft-touch” lamination and embossed lettering on the front covers of the paperback editions make these novellas a precious edition to any library. Both paperback and ebook editions feature special color endpaper artworks by Paul Chan.

God, I Don’t Even Know Your Name

Robert Pattinson Goes from Undead to Unwashed for Bel Ami

Christina Ricci and Robert Pattinson in Bel Ami
Christina Ricci and Robert Pattinson Star in Bel Ami (Images Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures)

If you loved Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon – the epic period drama about a beguiling rogue who manipulates (read: boinks) his way to the top of 18th century European society – but would prefer to skip all of those gory battle scenes and have the run time cut down from three hours to an economical 100 minutes, you might enjoy a new film called Bel Ami.

Based on the 1885 French eponymous novel by Guy de Maupassant (with a screenplay by Rachel Bennette) Bel Ami is directed by the team of Declan Donnellan and Nick Ormerod. Robert Pattinson (best known for his roles as vampire Edward Cullen from the Twilight film franchise) stars as Georges Duroy, a young, impoverished former soldier who moves to Paris in the 1890s to, literally, seek his fortune. Living in squalor and unemployed, Georges has a chance reunion with Charles Forestier (Philip Glenister), an acquaintance from his time in the military, and sufficiently charms his way not only into a job as a journalist but also into Forestier’s inner social /political circle. Forestier’s beautiful and well-educated wife, Madeleine (Uma Thurman), introduces Georges to her good friends Clotilde (Christina Ricci) and Virginie (Kristin Scott Thomas), both married, but ripe for distraction. Georges wastes no time in taking full advantage of Clotilde’s obvious attraction to him. The two embark on a a smoldering affair, which is the Georges’ first major seduction – his preferred method for bringing about the cooperation/ruination of anyone who would stand in the way of his quest for fame, riches and glory.

Robert Pattinson and Uma Thurman in Bel Ami
Robert Pattinson and Uma Thurman in Bel Ami

As the strong willed but appropriately vulnerable Madeleine (who eventually becomes Georges’ first wife), Uma Thurman steals every scene she is in. Her character’s insistence on maintaining her social and financial equality with the duplicitous Georges (who is unlikeable in almost every way and looks like he needs a bath in nearly every scene) also makes her the film’s most admirable / sympathetic character. What I found so engaging about Bel Ami was observing the manner in which Georges’ single-minded ambition becomes increasingly ruthless while remaining largely surreptitious.

To give up much more of the plot here would mean revealing “spoilers,” and this film is one that needs to unfold for the viewer on its own. Costumes, art direction and the original classical soundtrack (composed by Rachel Portman) are all first-rate and add authenticity to the film’s setting. The acting is excellent by all female leads and while the jury is still out on R Patz, he successfully portrays Georges as a vacuous but hard-hearted individual who is able to successfully use people as his means to an end because they are so easily able to project their emotions and desires onto his conscienceless, blank canvas of a persona. If I said I’d never met an individual like Georges in my own life, I’d be lying.

Bel Ami (Rated R for Sex and Nudity) opens Friday, June 8th 2012 at Sunshine Cinema 5, located at 143 East Houston Street, New York, NY.

The Cabin In The Woods: Not Your Typical Teen Horror Flick!

Cabin In the Woods Poster

There are certain movies that contain secret plot twists whose reveal is so pivotal to the way the film plays out – The Crying Game and Sixth Sense come to mind immediately – that the only way to avoid spoiling the film is to go into it with virtually no knowledge of what the movie is “about,” save for perhaps the most skeletal of story lines. The Joss Whedon-produced, Drew Goddard-directed horror/comedy The Cabin in The Woods is one such film. As I sat through the closing credits at last night’s press screening (exit music by Nine Inch Nails. Yes!) I was honestly confounded as to how I could “review” this film without ruining the sublime pleasure of navigating its multilayered, non-traditional plot detours. Because, in this case, the less you know about The Cabin in the Woods, the more satisfying your experience of the movie will be.

Sitting on the shelves at MGM for three years, Cabin’s release is perfectly timed to advance the hype of Whedon’s upcoming blockbuster-to-be, The Avengers, while also, purely by coincidence, having something in common with current box office smash The Hunger Games – and that can’t be bad for business. The basic plot launches from a weekend trip taken by five college student friends to a remote Cabin, ostensibly owned by one character’s cousin: a trip, of course, during which everything goes horribly, irreversibly wrong. These five kids embody every teen-slasher-flick-character cliché: there’s the Jock, the Slut, the Studious Girl, the Stoner Nerd who provides comic relief and the Nice Guy. From the film’s kick off, a parallel storyline involving a high tech company whose employees appear to know much more about the Cabin in The Woods than the five teens immediately takes the film to a level beyond the mundane and predictable. As the two main technicians, veteran actors Richard Jenkins (Six Feet Under) and Bradley Whitford (The West Wing) deliver some of the film’s best lines of sharp, comedic dialog and continuously break or heighten the tension as they manipulate the kids into behaving in ways that will lead them into further danger. And that’s all I’m going say about it, because, really, what comes next, and then next after that, is just too good to give away. Two horror stories that came to mind while watching Cabin include the film Thirteen Ghosts and Clive Barker’s original-novel version of Midnight Meat Train. If those comparisons pique your interest, The Cabin in The Woods is your wet dream of a horror film. I never go to see movies like this, and I really loved it.

Opening Nationwide on Friday, April 13th, The Worley Gig Gives The Cabin in the Woods Four out of Five Stars!