Tag Archive | LACMA

Chris Burden’s Metropolis II at LACMA

LACMA Chris Burden Metropolis 2 Overhead View
Photo By Gail

While I was at the LA County Museum of Art this past December to see the Stanley Kubrick retrospective, I also enjoyed the experience of stumbling upon Chris Burden’s room-sized kinetic sculpture, Metropolis II – the focal points of which are 1,100 Hot Wheels cars.

Burden finished this scale cityscape, which took four years to build, in the Summer of 2011 and it was installed at LACMA that Fall. Although you can walk completely around Metropolis II from the floor of the exhibit room, you really need to climb the stairs to the catwalk-like balcony to see the action from above and fully appreciate what Burden was trying to convey. The frenetic movement of the tiny cars is hypnotizing.

In a statement at the exhibit’s opening, Burden expressed his hypothesis that, “The future of automobile transportation is that there won’t be drivers anymore.” The 1,100 customized Hot Wheels cars whirring through a city of building-block skyscrapers is a scale model of Burden’s vision for L.A.’s future: Cars that are swiftly autopiloted along pre-determined routes, moving ten times faster than they do today.

The cars are dramatically lifted eight feet in the air by a magnetized conveyor belt, then dispatched through the city on a roller coaster network of plastic roadways. The buildings are constructed with Legos and Lincoln Logs, Erector Sets and stacking slotted cards. A dozen out-of-the-box electric trains chug casually through the sculpture.

Due to the physical strain on both the sculpture and the fact that it must be physically monitored at all times to watch for “pileups,” Metropolis II runs for only one hour at a time, with a one hour break between sessions, from Friday through Sunday. The viewing schedule is below and no reservations are required:

Fridays
11:30–12:30 PM; 1:30–2:30 PM; 3:30–4:30 PM; 5:30–6:30 PM

Saturdays & Sundays
10:30 am–11:30 PM; 12:30–1:30 PM; 2:30–3:30 PM; 4:30–5:30 PM

LACMA is located at 5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, California 90036.

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Urban Light By Chris Burden at LACMA

Chris Burden LACMA Street Lamps Installation
Urban Light, 2008, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Sculpture, (Two-hundred and two) restored cast iron antique street lamps (Photos By Gail)

Link to Original Text Source

This forest of city street lights, called Urban Light, was created by artist Chris Burden. Despite initial appearances, the arrangement is not a perfect grid. Depending on where the viewer stands, the lamps arrange themselves in different angles and arrays.

These 202 cast iron lamps once lit the streets of Los Angeles. Burden bought one at the Rose Bowl flea market, and soon collecting and restoring street lights became an obsession. He painted them all the same neutral gray, in order to draw the eye to all the different varieties of cast iron decoration.

Burden says that street lamps like these were symbols of a civilized and sophisticated city; safe after dark and beautiful to behold. The lights all still work, and they are now powered by solar energy. They are switched on every night from dusk until dawn. At night, Burden says his sculpture becomes transformed into “a building with a roof of light.
Urban Light By Chris Burden at LACMA

Penetrable By Jesus Rafael Soto at LACMA

Penetrable by Jesus Rafael Soto at LACMA
All Photos By Gail

LACMA (Los Angeles County Museum of Art) currently has on site this 1990 sculpture entitled Penetrable, by the late Venezuelan artist, Jesús Rafael Soto. On loan from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros collection, Penetrable consists of innumerable suspended plastic hoses (which look like long, yellow noodles) that visitors can walk through and interact with. Speaking of a loan, a lot of people are taking the loan to have their own houses. It’s helpful especially for unfortunate people who don’t have enough money to buy property in cash. In fact, a lot of people made a post about its convenience in terms of dealing with financial crisis, and how being able to get tenant guarantor loans has helped them.Kids I saw at the museum on the day of my visit really seemed to be into it, and it’s a lot of fun for adults as well.

Penetrable by Jesus Rafael Soto at LACMA

Penetrable by Jesus Rafael Soto at LACMA

LACMA is located at 5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, California 90036.

Stanley Kubrick Retrospective at LA County Museum of Art

 LACMA Kubrick Exhibit Title

While I was in Califorina over the Christmas holdays I was fortunate to be able to check out the Stanley Kubrick Career Retrospective at LACMA – which was just amazing! I absolutley loved the exhibit and took a bunch of pictures, some of which I’ll share with you in this post.

As the museum’s website concisely describes the exhibit: “Stanley Kubrick was known for exerting complete artistic control over his projects; in doing so, he reconceived the genres in which he worked. The exhibition covers the breadth of Kubrick’s practice, beginning with his early photographs for Look magazine, taken in the 1940s, and continuing with his groundbreaking directorial achievements of the 1950s through the 1990s. His films are represented through a selection of annotated scripts, production photography, lenses and cameras, set models, costumes and props.

Kubrick Posters Wall
A Selection of Posters and Lobby Cards from Kubrick’s Films

In addition, the exhibition explores Napoleon and The Aryan Papers, two projects that Kubrick never completed, as well as the technological advances developed and utilized by Kubrick and his team. By featuring this legendary film auteur and his oeuvre as the focus of his first retrospective in the context of an art museum, the exhibition reevaluates how we define the artist in the 21st century, and simultaneously expands upon LACMA’s commitment to exploring the intersection of art and film.”

Below is a selection of my photos from the show, representative of an overview of the exhibit. Enjoy!

Kubrick Strangelove Model
Miniature Boardroom Set from Dr. Strangelove

Kubrick 2001 Seating
Seating from 2001: A Space Odyssey. Production Stills at Rear of Gallery.

Kubrick 2001 Cutlery Props
Custom Designed Futuristic Cutlery used in 2001.

Kubrick 2001 Space Ship Model
Spaceship Model from 2001

Kubrick 2001 Model Set
2001 Miniature Model Set

Kubrick Barry Lyndon Costumes

Kubrick’s epic period drama, Barry Lyndon, is represented mostly by its lavish costumes. Barry Lyndon is a fantastic film if you have three hours to devote to a viewing.

Kubrick Spartacus Costume
Costume from Spartacus

Kubrick Clockwork Milkbar Props

Signage and Props from the Korovoa Milk Bar scene in A Clockwork Orange — My favorite movie of all time!

Kubrick Clockwork Orange Droog Costume

Droog Costume worn by Malcom McDowell as Alex, A Clockwork Orange. Notice the skewed shadow of the baton against the wall.

 Kubrick Clockwork Orange Turntable

Alex’s Turntable.  Trivia: the British band Heaven 17 took their name from the pre-orgy record store scene in this film.

Kubrick Shining Production Stills

The Shining Production Stills. Note the emphatic use of the color red, which Kubrick employed in each of his films to heighten the emotional impact of certain scenes.

Kubrick Shining Hedge Maze Miniature

The Shining Hedge Maze Model

Kubrick Shining Room Wall with Axes

The Shining’s Grady Sisters with Axes buried in the gallery wall.

Kubrick EWS Masks

Masks from Eyes Wide Shut

Kubrick AI Set Rendering

AI Set Rendering

Kubrick Hellacopter Model from Full Metal Jacket
Helicopter Model from Full Metal Jacket

Stanley Kubrick Runs Through June 30, 2013 in the Art of the Americas Building, Level 2 at LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036. Admission to the Exhibit, which includes Admission to all Galleries, is $20.00. Tickets can be purchased online at This Link.

Top Ten Fun Things About My Trip to California That I Did Not Blog About Yet

Tar Pits

1. Sue and I were walking to the fancy Marie Calendars restaurant to have a delicious lunch before going to the LA County Museum of Art (LACMA) when I mentioned to her that, “Gee, it really smells like tar out here.” She then pointed out that we were, in fact, walking directly across the street from The La Brea Tar Pits. Funny! But seriously, that shit smells like tar.

Balloon Dog

2. You know, I was all ready to slag Jeff Koons over his sculpture that looks like he just inflated a kid’s pool toy and crammed it through the rungs of a cheap aluminum ladder that he bought at Home Depot. But then it was explained to me that the pool toy is actually meticulously crafted out of Stainless Steele and painted to look like an inflated pool toy. So, snaps for Jeff Koons, because who thinks of doing stuff like that? And how about that giant balloon dog sculpture the size of a house? Fuck, that was rad.

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