Tag Archive | Eastern Parkway

Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum Subway Stop

Eastern Parkway Subway
All Photos By Gail

When you enter into, or exit from, the subway at the Eastern Parkway-Brooklyn Museum stop, you can’t help but notice that you appear to have entered a showcase for the spoils from some kind of urban archaeological dig. Dozens of artifacts are embedded into the walls to create as stunning a display as anything you’ll see inside the museum.

The permanent installation is part of MTA Arts & Design (formerly Arts for Transit). The 2/3 train subway stop at this station features 78 pieces from the Brooklyn Museum’s own collection of ornaments taken from New York City buildings that are long gone. In fact, the Museum has long served as a repository for ornamental architectural forms salvaged from significant buildings that were being demolished. For installation, mosaic tiles were added along the walls to frame the objects.

Here are some of our favorite pieces photographed this unique subway station. Enjoy!

Brooklyn Museum Subway Stop

Brooklyn Museum Subway Stop

Brooklyn Museum Subway Stop

Brooklyn Museum Subway Stop

Brooklyn Museum Subway Stop

Brooklyn Museum Subway Stop

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A Visit to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden!

Fountain of Flowers
All Photos By Gail

It was a complete accident that Geoffrey and I ended up making a pit stop at the gorgeous Brooklyn Botanic Garden as part of a recent trip to visit the Brooklyn Museum. It wasn’t until we were on the train that I noticed (for the first time, ever) that the Eastern Parkway Stop off the 2 and 3 is also the stop for the BBG, so I suggested to Geoffrey that we “See how far away it is from the museum” once we got out of the subway. What we discovered, much to our ecstatic delight, is that the Garden is literally right next to the Museum. It could not possibly have been more conveniently located. Even better, Geoffrey’s work ID card got us in for free, and since we had no strict agenda to follow, we spent over an hour exploring nature as a prelude to some hardcore, art-viewing action. It was an amazing day!

Pillar

Make sure you pick up a map of the grounds at the entrance because, while it is fun to just wander freely, the place is massive, and you might find that there are certain areas you want to make sure you see before you need to head out.

Trellis

Sunscreen is recommended on a bright sunny day, but even if you are looking to get a tan, there are plenty of shady areas to walk, such as this trellis-covered path that took us to our first stop, the Native Flora Garden.

Native Flora Garden Signage

Native Flora Garden Path

The Native Flora Garden feels like being on a forest path, where you can see hundreds of plants that are native the New York Metropolitan area. It is flat terrain, but it is still a nice hike.

Bird

Y0u can also spot birds and other small wildlife.

Limestone Ledge

Limestone Ledge. All of Manhattan used to look like this.

Orange Wildflowers

There are lots of wild flowers as well. Most have identifying signs near them so you know what you are looking at.  Educational!

Native Flora Garden Signage

The people who created this fountain are truly outdoor fountain pros. I wanted to jump into this fountain to cool off, but it is not allowed.

Row of Pink Roses

Next, we headed over to the Cranford Rose Garden.

Rose Garden Full View Pink and Purple

Cranford Rose Garden Statue

There must be thousands of Rose bushes, plus other flowers and flowering plants in this garden.

Red Roses

Looking at all of these beautiful rose bushes made me feel extremely nostalgic for my late Grandmother, who had an incredible green thumb and was always so proud of her rose garden.

Cranford Rose Garden

You could take a million pictures. I nearly did!

Pink Rose Blooms

Remember that flowers mean that there will be bees buzzing about, doing their thing. If you are allergic, please use caution, but never swat at a bee! Bees make our food. Please let them live.

Cranford Rose Garden

Looking for a shady place to sit and rest, our next stop was the Cherry Esplanade.

Cherry Esplanade

The Cherry Esplanade is rows and rows of Cherry trees that are no longer flowering by Summer, but which provide a gorgeous green shade just the same.

Flowering Bushes

At the end of the Esplanade is the Rose Arc Pool. More Flowers! More Bees! More Sun! Nature is Awesome!

Flowered Arches

Green Plant

Sun Dial

If you walk up to that building and take a left, you’ll end up at the Japanese Hill-and-Pond Garden.

Japanese Garden

The pond is a bit green, to say the least, but you can see fish and turtles swimming in it. The Red Archway in the water is called a Torii. It is commonly found at the entrance to a Shinto temple or shrine.

Japanese Maple

Japanese Maple Tree.

Pagoda and Pond

We stopped by the gift shop for quick a browse before making our way back over to the Museum, where we had an excellent time before returning to the city for dinner. I can’t wait to go back to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden to see everything we missed on our first trip!

BBG Signage

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden is Located at 150 Eastern Parkway, with entrances also at 455 Flatbush Avenue, and also at 990 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11225. Take the 2 or 3 to Eastern Parkway if that train is near you! Otherwise, get other directions, plus more information to help plan your visit at This Link!

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Must See Art – Keith Haring: 1978–1982 at The Brooklyn Museum

Keith Haring Exhibit Card

Image Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum. All Additional Photos By Me.

Spring has sprung, and the cherry blossoms are in serious bloom out front of the Brooklyn Museum, where from now until July 8th you can see an exciting retrospective on the early career of the late Keith Haring. Here in downtown NYC, especially, Haring’s humorous yet socially provocative, instantly recognizable pop art images are enduring and almost ubiquitous even 22 years after his death. I’ve always been attracted to Keith’s clever line drawings and the sense of humor inherent in his work, but it wasn’t until I watched Christina Clausen’s 2008 documentary The Universe of Keith Haring (rent it on Netflix) that I realized what a true visionary and genius he was. It seems that the great ones always leave us too soon.

Keith Haring Long Wall Mural

According to the official press release, Keith Haring: 1978–1982 is the first large-scale exhibition to explore the early career of one of the best-known American artists of the twentieth century. Tracing the development of Haring’s extraordinary visual vocabulary, the exhibition includes 155 works on paper, numerous experimental videos, and over 150 archival objects, including rarely seen sketchbooks, journals, exhibition flyers, posters, subway drawings, and documentary photographs.

Keith Haring Exhibit Crowd

The exhibition chronicles the period in Haring’s career from his arrival in New York City through the years when he started his studio practice and began making public and political art on the city streets. Immersing himself in New York’s downtown culture, he quickly became a fixture on the artistic scene, befriending other artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Kenny Scharf, as well as many of the most innovative cultural figures of the period. The critical role that these relationships played in Haring’s development as a public artist and facilitator of group exhibitions and performances is also explored.

Keith Haring Subway Art with Pia Zadora

Pieces on view include a number of very early works never before seen in public; seven video pieces, including Painting Myself into a Corner (his first video piece) and Tribute to Gloria Vanderbilt; and collages created from cut-up fragments of his own writing, history textbooks, and newspapers. Keith Haring died from AIDS related complications in February of 1990 at the age of 31, but his art and message will live on forever. For more information on the Keith Haring exhibit visit the Brooklyn Museum’s website at this link.

Keith Haring Where Meat Comes From

Keith Haring: 1978–1982 will be on Exhibit through July 8, 2012 in the Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 5th Floor of The Brooklyn Museum, located at 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, which is easily accessible from Manhattan via the 2 or 3 Trains to the Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum exit. So Easy! Hours are Wednesday: 11:00 AM – 6:00 PM, Thursday: 11:00 AM –10:00 PM and Friday–Sunday: 11:00 AM – 6:00 PM. Phone: (718)638-5000 for Additional Information.

Keith Haring Flyer Wall

See Additional Photos from this exhibit at According2g.com and after the jump!

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