Tag Archive | Sculptures

Iván Navarro’s Mute Parade at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Impenetrable Room
Impenetrable Room By Iván Navarro All Photos By Gail

Paul Kasmin Gallery’s Tenth Avenue space is currently hosting Mute Parade, an exhibit of light installations by  Chilean-born artist Iván Navarro, for his second solo show with the gallery. Mute Parade transforms multiple gallery rooms into a synesthetic environment continuing Navarro’s ongoing use of light, sound, and language to engage with issues of power, migration, and propaganda.

First Gallery Installation View

Upon entering the gallery, the viewer is faced with a series of new works by the artist including Tuning (2015), a pyramid of six towering drums.

Tuning

Navarro combines the drums with mirrors and the words High, Tone, Tune, Bass, Mute, and Deaf to create a visual representation idea of sound (or noise) while at the same time removing and negating the original function of the instruments. This is a way of “playing a song” without making any sound.

MEBE

None of What You Hear

Center Room Installation View

In the center of the adjacent room, there are two freestanding 6-foot diameter drums that incorporate neon, LED lights, mirrors, and electricity. Circular texts written in light repeat the words KickBack and KnockKnockKnock – giving the appearance of an endless loop. Throughout the exhibition, the new works employ silence and stillness to create an uncanny perception of sound and movement and to explore the relationship between seeing and hearing.

Impenetrable Room

In the last room gallery, the viewer enters a labyrinth of four 6 x 6 foot structures that together make up the Impenetrable Room (2016). This new body of work co-opts the materials and format of portable “road cases,” which are customarily used to transport and protect musical instruments. Refitting the cases with mirrors and neon light, Navarro transforms these static objects into deep spaces that appear to recede towards infinity.

Impenetrable Room

In this installation, undulating lines of green neon diagrammatically echo the propagation of sound waves through a medium. Silent and monolithic, these self-contained rooms resonate with unspoken narrative power.

Read You Loud Unclear

Black and white paper squares are scattered across the floors of both galleries. The words Read You and Loud Unclear, printed on opposite sides of the cards, call attention to the disjunction between the visual and auditory aspects of communication. Informed by the aesthetics and rhythms of military parades, the exhibition contemplates the juxtaposed feelings of celebration and intimidation that martial music is intended to create.

Tuning Alternate View

Iván Navarro’s Mute Parade will be on Exhibit Through December 23rd, 2016 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, located at 293 Tenth Avenue (Corner of 27th Street) in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Impenetrable Room

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Changing Subjects By Elmgreen & Dragset at Flag Art Foundation

Untitled
Untitled, 2011 By Elmgreen & Dragset (All Photos By Gail)

The Flag Art Foundation is currently hosting Changing Subjects, a solo exhibition by internationally acclaimed Scandinavian artists Elmgreen & Dragset. Changing Subjects, designed by the artists, presents new and existing works from the duo’s twenty-year-long collaboration that address existential issues linked to identity, sexuality, and mortality, as well as an examination of social value systems and the expectations that surround them.

Changing Subjects investigates the multiple meanings of the word “subject” as a noun. In grammatical terms, the subject can be a noun functioning as one of the main components of a clause, making it the element about which the rest of the clause is predicated. In turn, the predicate is the part of a sentence or clause that expresses what is said of the subject on its own. In the context of Changing Subjects, the subject of each work exists independently of the others, yet when viewed together, they shift positions, creating a complex interconnection between the autonomous works.

Go Go Go
Go, Go, Go!

The works in the exhibition, ranging in date of creation from 1998 to 2016, collectively guide visitors on a non-linear journey through various life stages. However, the sculptures and installations do not mark momentous occasions; on the contrary, they show introspective, unspectacular moments, by way of a figurative representation, by the use of a minimalist symbolic language, or by employing the actual materials to which they refer. Even when a lifelike human form is not shown, presence is implied through absence. The repeated use of an antiseptic material like stainless steel underscores a sense of a clinical study and evokes solitary feelings of abandonment.

Modern Moses
Modern Moses

Among the works in the exhibition on the 9th floor is Modern Moses, 2006, a wax figure depicting a sleeping baby in a carrycot at the food of an ATM machine; and The Experiment (2011) a sculpture of a little boy in front of a mirror wearing his mother’s lipstick and high heels.

The Experiment

Powerless Structures Fig 19
Powerless Structures, Fig. 19

An early readymade by the artist duo, Powerless Structures, Fig. 19, (1998), consists of two pairs of Calvin Klein underwear inside faded Levi’s jeans lying on the floor, as if someone has just undressed and dropped them.

Side Effects

Side Effects (2015), fills the 10th floor with an installation of hand-blown glass vases filled with the actual pastel-colored pigments used to coat the latest generation of HIV medicines. The title refers to the physiological effects of the life-saving medication, as well as the resulting decrease in media attention that has followed these medical advances.

Side Effects

The exhibition also includes a site-specific sculpture on its outdoor terrace, overlooking the Hudson River.

Watching

Watching (2016) is a new, life-size sculpture of a man on a lifeguard stand, likely more voyeur than rescuer, looking out over the Hudson River with binoculars. Made out of stainless steel, the polished surface mirrors and distorts the surroundings, and shifts the perspective on who and what is being watched.

Changing Subjects By Elmgreen & Dragset will be on Exhibit Through December 17th, 2016 at Flag Art Foundation, Located at 545 West 25th Street, 9th Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

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Fancy Animal Carnival By Hung Yi in The Garment District

Pandas
Panda Family By Hung Yi (All Photos By Gail)

One of Taiwan’s most acclaimed contemporary artists, Hung Yi (洪易), in association with NYC’s Emmanuel Fremin Gallery, has brought a selection of his large scale, fantastical and cheerful sculptures to New York City in a Fall/Winter exhibition. Fancy Animal Carnival is currently on view outdoors in the Garment District Pedestrian Plazas, between 34th Street and 42nd Street.

Dromedary Camel
Dromedary Camel

Hung Yi creates animated and personified interpretations of animals based on symbols from Taiwanese traditions, which are believed to be lucky. He paints the whimsical sculptures with patterns and texts that are aligned with fortuitous intention. Yi’s works are displayed in many locations outside of Taiwan, which include airports, theater halls, plazas and universities all around the world, and it is very cool to have this exhibit here in the city for all to enjoy!

Bactrian Camel
Bactrian Camel

All sculptures are created from painted, baked enamel on steel plate, and they are mounted on granite pedestals.

Bactrian Camel Detail
Bactrian Camel, Detail

Here are a few of the sculptures that you will encounter as you walk along Broadway between Herald Square and Times Square.

Fortunate Round Dragon
Fortunate Round Dragon

Dynamic Round Dragon
Dynamic Round Dragon

Yellow Ox
Yellow Ox

Buffalo and Eagle
Buffalo and Eagle

Dragon Horse
Dragon Horse

Hung Yi’s Fancy Animal Carnival will be on Display Along NYC’s Garment District Pedestrian Plazas, Broadway between 34th Street and 41st Street, Through April 15th, 2017.

Auspicious Triple Sheep
Auspicious Triple Sheep

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Art By Chad Wys at The Joseph Gross Gallery

Sculpture by Chad Wys

All Photos By Gail

Multidisciplinary artist, Chad Wys has some really fantastic work in  Not The Sum of Its Parts, Just The Parts, up now at the Joseph Gross Gallery. The two person show (which also includes works by Jesse Draxler) examines the variables of abstraction, conceptualism, and mark­making. In this exhibit, Wys rips apart and questions the use of traditional arts materials, rediscovering and reevaluating the limits of the surface.

Sculpture by Chad Wys

Painting by Chad Wys

The title of the show is a reactionary statement against the Aristotelian philosophy that “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.”  Rather, the title attempts to highlight, in a multi­layered approach, that each part is essential, individual, unique, and not­ to­ be overlooked in its contribution to the “whole.” Both artists utilize this principle in their practice.

Paintings by Chad Wys

Chad Wys is interested in manipulating found objects – the more in a state of depreciation, the better – he adds new life, meaning and function to existing materials and products, adding to the object’s history and its journey. Throughout his work he has maintained a longstanding fascination with the ideals of conceptualism. Informed by Dadaism and minimalism as well as post­modernist philosophy, Wys’ work examines visuality, from images and objects to decorations and art, and how the reproduction of these materials influence our visual experience.

Painting by Chad Wys

Not The Sum Of Its Parts, Just The Parts, Featuring the Works of  Chad Wys, will be on Exhibit Through October 1st, 2016 at Joseph Gross Gallery, Located at 548 W 28th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Paintings by Chad Wys

Let’s Go: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden at MOMA!

MOMA Sculpture Garden
All Photos By Gail

Summer doesn’t last forever, especially in NYC, so why not plan to enjoy the nice weather while we have it by spending as much time outside in beautiful places as possible? Just do it! There are lots of really grand indoor water features such as fountains and wall waterfalls with lights and sounds to amuse the children.

Moma Sculpture Garden Fountain

Maybe you are already a huge fan of Art, but weren’t aware that the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) has a gorgeous, landscaped sculpture garden that provides a relaxing oasis in the center of Manhattan. It’s only open when the weather is nice, so you need to go now.

Skyscraper Vertical View
This is Your Vertical View While Seated Near the Fountain Pictured Directly Above

The Sculpture Garden is named for Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, an American socialite and philanthropist who was the wife of financier and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller Jr. Mrs. Rockefeller was known for being the driving force behind MOMA’s creation. It is nice that they named the sculpture garden for her.

IMG_2274
The Garden Has a Few Bubbling Fountains Like This One

There is lots of seating and shady areas, and they even have a bar where you can buy a coffee or a drink. Here is some of the art that you can see in the garden right now.

Alexander Calder Sandys Butterfly

This sculpture by Alexander Calder is called Sandy’s Butterfly, and it has a mobile feature at the top. Calder, who went by the nickname Sandy, was most famous for his mobiles.

Alexander Calder Sandys Butterfly

Anthony Caro Midday

This one is called Midday and is by British sculptor Anthony Caro, who passed away in 2013.

Anthony Caro Midday

As you can imagine, children are very attracted to these brightly colored objects, although climbing on the art is not allowed — both for the safety of the children and the preservation of the art.

Ellsworth Kelly Green Blue
Green Blue

Ellsworth Kelly’s work is associated with hard-edge painting, Color Field painting, and Minimalism, and he was one of the most famous American artists of all time when he passed away on December 27, 2015 at the age of 92. I love his work.

Signage

 

New Richard Serra Sculptures at Gagosian Gallery

Every Which Way
Every Which Way, 2015 (All Photos By Gail)

Both of Gagosian Gallery’s Chelsea locations are currently hosting a new selection of Richard Serra’s monumental minimalist sculptures created from slabs of forged steel.

Silence
Silence (for John Cage)

Through
Through

Personally, I am fond of the ones that you can walk inside of, or through, such as this one, which, appropriately, is entitled Through.

Through
Inside Through

Above Below Betwixt Between
Above Below Betwixt Between

This one is painted on the four walls of a small room.

Signage

The above four sculptures are located at 555 West 24th Street.

NJ-1
NJ-1

If you walk a few blocks south you can find NJ-1, which is a huge maze you can walk in, over at 522 West 21st Street. Very fun!

These Richard Serra Sculptures will be up until July 29th, 2016, at the above noted locations in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Every Which Way
Every Which Way

Jonathan LeVine Gallery Presents: Mike Leavitt’s King Cuts!

Alfred Hitchcock
Alfred Hitchcock Is a Bird, by Mike Leavitt (All Photos By Gail)

You loved his homage to the contemporary art world in Art Army Royalty; you thrilled to his Star Wars character mashups with Empire Peaks; and now, Mike Leavitt returns for his third solo exhibition at Jonathan LeVine, King Cuts – honoring the artist’s obsession with 16 of the Best Film Directors Ever! And what great show it is!

Orson Welles
Orson Welles with Key Props from Citizen Kane and A Touch of Evil

Great film directors make sacrifices and compromises when creating a movie. They’re eaten by their work and very often their body succumbs to the pressure. In King Cuts, Leavitt transforms some of the most renowned directors into satirical sculptures, combining their physical attributes with features reminiscent of their most recognizable on-screen characters. Standing 18 inches tall at one quarter inch scale, each sculpture is carved from a single block of wood, similar to the way these auteurs might cut a take or reel.

Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola with Thematic Images from Rumblefish, Dracula, and The Godfather

Through his clever mash-ups, Leavitt has created totems devoted to the best story tellers of all-time that explore the role of being an artist and pose the question, is it possible not to merge art and life?

Stanley Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick Wears the Dress of One of the Twins from The Shining. Also Present are References to Full Metal Jacket, A Clockwork Orange, and 2001

Stanley Kubrick Detail
Stanley Kubrick Detail with Alex DeLarge’s False Eyelashes

Similar to the way Kubrick, Spielberg and Tarantino use the camera like a window to gaze out, Leavitt humorously reverts the gaze back to them. Under their control or not, work sweeps over the life of the creator. Their imagery becomes more powerful than themselves and their icons overtake their anatomy.

David Lynch
David Lynch is Presented with Allusions to The Elephant Man, Dune and Wild at Heart

Mike Leavitt
The Artist, (Right) at the Exhibit’s Opening Reception. He is very nice to fans!

Trading Cards Set 1

Mike also made a set of collectible trading cards of each of the Director’s Sculptures, and the back of each one has a little story about each character.

Trading Cards Set 2

Kathryn Bigelow
Kathryn Bigelow, and the card which describes her, below.

Kathryn Bigelow Trading Card

Leavitt is obviously a passionate film buff who aims to elevate these directors as high artists, while also surreally lampooning them with a taste of their own iconic medicine. He explains, I love movies and I love art. The magic overwhelms me. Moviemakers are consumed by their work, similar to the way my own work overtakes my life. Whether a block of wood, a scene ending or film reel edit, every cut takes conviction. Trust in that vision is so powerful that they relinquish their anatomy. That’s why I sculpted their bodies physically devoured by their work.”

Tim Burton
Tim Burton Personified with Motifs from Beetlejuice, Batman and Edward Scissorhards

Installation View
Installation View, Left Right: Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, George Lucas

Mike Leavitt’s talent is just insane. The details of each sculpture are absolutely breathtaking and this exhibit is lots of fun to experience in person. Don’t miss it!

Mike Leavitt’s King Cuts will be on Exhibit Through June 11th, 2016, at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street, 9th Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.
King Cuts Signage

James Cameron
James Cameron, Avatar Meets Titanic with side of Aliens and Terminator

Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson Films include The Darjeeling Limited, Bottle Rocket, Moonrise Kingdom, Rushmore, Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Royal Tenenbaums and The Grand Budapest Hotel