Tag Archive | Brooklyn

Paula Almeida Mural By Angel A, Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Paula Almeida Mural
Photo By Gail

Flashing back to a fun day spent at the Five Points Festival back in June, 2018, we remember passing by this epic likeness of Brazilian model Paula Almeida by artist Angel A. You can see it for yourself at the southeast corner of West Street and Milton Street in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

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The Wonder Morton Organ Console at Kings Theatre

Wonder Morton Organ Console
Photos By Gail

This is the restored console of the Robert Morton Organ originally installed in the Loew’s Kings Theatre in 1929. The design is one of the flagship models of the company, which collectively became known as the Wonder Mortons, because they were all installed in the five Loew’s “Wonder Theatres” built in the New York City area toward the end of the 1920s. The striking decoration and design of this console is not unique to this particular instrument, but it is a consistent feature of the Wonder Mortons.

The Robert Morton Company  was the second-largest producer of theatre pipe organs in the United States. Although their larger instruments have not fared well over the years, many fine examples still exist. In a relationship similar to that of the Fox Theatres and the Wurlitzer Company, the Robert Morton Company provided pipe organs to both the Pantages and Loew’s theatre chains, therefore when the Loew’s Company set about creating the biggest and best theatres in their system, they asked the Robert Morton Company to create the biggest and best organs for these theatres.

Wonder Morton Organ Console

The prototype of the Wonder Mortons is housed in the Sanger Theatre in New Orleans; currently dormant and awaiting restoration after the damages done by Hurricane Katrina. The first Robert Morton organ to boast the fence design that decorates the top of the Wonder Mortons is stilled housed in the Providence Performing Arts Center — formerly the Loew’s State Theatre — in Providence, Rhode Island.

It is noteworthy that this instrument is simply the console of the pipe organ. The pipes, bellows and airway infrastructure of the organ have been dismantled and removed, or have fallen victim to the damage that the Kings Theatre suffered due to leaking, while sitting vacant and neglected through the end of the last century.

Photographed in the Kings Theatre in Brooklyn, New York.

The Occasionalists Present: Post-Inauguration Live Karaoke to Benefit Planned Parenthood

Drumpf Karaoke

Hey, do you hate Donald Trump? I sure do. I hate him sooo much, just being serious. If you feel like I do, and you also enjoy performing Karaoke, let me tell you about a fun event happening this Friday. On January 27th, The Occasionalists, a wildly talented, Brooklyn-based cover band will be hosting Post-Inauguration Live Karaoke at Union Hall in Brooklyn. Tickets are only $10, with all  proceeds benefitting Planned Parenthood, and other Rights organizations.

The Occasionalists will play all of the songs live and then you can just sing along – super fun! Come let your voice be heard — on stage, in the crowd or at the bar! Have some fun and relax in safe place filled with other sane people who didn’t help to get us into this mess!

Proposed Set List for the Evening Will Feature All of Your Favorites, Including:

It’s the End of the World As We Know It – R.E.M.
Revolution — The Beatles
Get Up, Stand Up — Bob Marley
Refugee — Tom Petty
Life During Wartime — Talking Heads
You’re So Vain – Carly Simon
Crazy Train — Ozzy
Freedom 90 — George Michael
London Calling — The Clash
I Will Survive — Cake
Eve of Destruction — Barry McGuire
Should I Stay or Should I Go — The Clash
Creep — Radiohead
Seven Nation Army — White Stripes
Anarchy in the U.K. — Sex Pistols
Come Together — The Beatles
Won’t Get Fooled Again — The Who
Highway to Hell — AC/DC
Fight the Power — Public Enemy
Road to Nowhere — Talking Heads
These Boots Were Made for Walking — Nancy Sinatra
Say It Ain’t So — Weezer
Hallellujah — Leonard Cohen
Psycho Killer — Talking Heads
Redemption Song — Bob Marley
What I Got — Sublime
Sympathy for the Devil – Stones

The Dirty Waltz Band will warm up the house starting at 7:30 PM, with The Occasionalists hitting the stage at 8:45 PM. Union Hall is located at 702 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY, 11215 (N R Q 4 And 5 Trains). If you happen to get hungry, Union Hall also serves delicious food! Further show details can be found Here, and on the FaceBook event page Here. Purchase Tickets in advance Right Here.

Sweet Toof Mural on Flushing Avenue

Sweet Toof
Photo By Gail

I passed by this mural, by UK-based street artist Sweet Toof, while walking up Flushing Avenue in Brooklyn on the way to the Great Big Bacon Picnic. I have no idea how long it’s been up, but the building is near the corner of Whipple Street.

Cobra Mural By Woodz, Williamsburg

Cobra Mural
All Photos By Gail

We set out on a very satisfying Street Art Safari this past weekend in Williamsburg, Brooklyn — a great neighborhood to in which to capture the Big Game, such as this really vibrant Cobra Mural by the artist known as Woodz. This mural is located on the south side of North 8th Street just east of Berry Street.

Cobra Mural from the West

Here is a photo of the full mural, taken from its west end. You can see that an Eagle is also involved.

Red Lotus Flower

A bright red Lotus Flower caps the mural and its easternmost tip.

Eagle on Mural

Here’s a better shot of the Eagle. Woodz is also a tattoo artist and owner of Magic Cobra Tattoo Society in Brooklyn. See more of his work at This Link!

Ten Photographs of the Coney Island Parachute Jump

Coney Island Parachute Jump
All Photos By Gail

The Parachute Jump is a defunct amusement ride in Coney Island, whose iconic open-frame steel structure remains a Brooklyn landmark. Standing 250 feet tall and weighing 170 tons, it has been called the Eiffel Tower of Brooklyn. Well, I’ve never called it that, but apparently some people have.

Thunderbolt and Parachute Jump
Parachute Jump in the Shadow of the Thunderbolt Roller-Coaster

If you Google “Photos of Coney Island” you will see that it is arguably the single most photographed landmark near the Boardwalk. Originally built for the 1939 New York World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park, Queens, the tower was moved to its current site, then part of the Steeplechase Park amusement park, in 1941.

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Seen from Inside a Burger Joint on The Boardwalk

It is the only portion of Steeplechase Park still standing today. The ride ceased operations in 1964, when that park shut down for good. How old were you in 1964? I was 3.

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The ride was based on functional parachutes which were held open by metal rings throughout the ascent and descent. Twelve cantilevered steel arms sprout from the top of the tower, each of which supported a parachute attached to a lift rope and a set of surrounding guide cables.

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Riders were belted into a two-person canvas seat hanging below the closed chute, then hoisted to the top, where a release mechanism would drop them, the descent slowed only by the parachute. Shock absorbers at the bottom, consisting of pole-mounted springs, cushioned the landing. Each parachute required three cable operators, keeping labor expenses high.

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The tower lights up at night, and colorful the patterns change constantly. It is quite mesmerizing to view.

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2 Gs Parachute Jump 2

I love how my hair looks in this photo. I cropped Geoffrey out, because he said he looked fat. Which, not true. But whatever.
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We had fun. We always do.

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