Tag Archive | Art

Ron English’s Ronnnie Rabbbit on West 14th Street

Ron English Corner of 14th and 9th
All Photos By Gail

On the north side of  the intersection where 14th Street crosses both 9th Avenue and Hudson Street (just across the street from the Apple Store), there’s a triangle-shaped plaza that currently appears to be under construction. For what, who can say. But the concrete barriers that border the space support a chain-link fence which is wrapped on all sides in vibrant, multi colored images of  Ronnnie Rabbbit;  the three eyed, three-eared mutant rabbit character created by Popaganda artist Ron English.

Ronnie Rabbbit

What is Ronnnie hiding? Please leave your clues in the comments!

Ronnnie Rabbbit Fence

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Very Large Fish Lure on Water Street

Very Large Fish Lure
All Photos By Gail

I’ve posted many photos  and stories behind the fantastic public art that can be found in the Financial District, and here’s another piece I just discovered thanks to a tip on Instagram (thanks @fidi_living). Public spaces built by the Kaufman Organization are known for their quirky objects and splashes of color, and the plaza and arcade space at 200 Water Street, adjacent to Fulton Street to the northeast, is no exception.

Very Large Fish Lure
View Facing North

Completed in 1972, the Fulton Plaza, as it is officially known, maintains much of the original 1970s whimsy of the space, which  has recently undergone some renovations since the building it flanks was converted by a new owner from offices to residential dormitory use. Here you will find a Giant Fishing Lure (which, research reveals, once hung above  a pool of water). The Lure’s cascading hooks dangle ominously, ready to ensnare the next victim!

Very Large Fish Lure
View Facing West South Street Seaport

Entitled Very Large Fish Lure, the sculpture is credited to the Rebel Fishing Lure Co., with concept design by the late graphic designer Rudolph de Harak, a favorite of Kaufman’s, whose work was used at other company buildings.

 Merman’s Mermaid by Forrest Wilson
Merman’s Mermaid (1971) by Forrest Wilson

You can see that the plaza’s water theme continues in this fun mural, seen in the second photo of this post, which adorns a wall just north of the sculpture.

Very Large Fish Lure

Look out for those hooks!

Very Large Fish Lure

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Modern Art Monday Presents: The Birth of Venus By Alexandre Cabanel

Birth Of Venus
Photo By Gail

The first version of Alexandre Cabanel’s  The Birth of Venus created a sensation at the Salon of 1863, which was dubbed the “Salon of Venuses” owing to the number of alluring nudes on view. Embodying the ideals of academic art, the careful modeling, silky brushwork, and mythological subject of Cabanel’s canvas proved a winning combination: the Salon picture was purchased by no leas that Napoleon III for his personal collection. In 1875 , Jon Wolfe commissioned the present, slightly smaller, replica from Cabanel.

Photographed in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC

Pink Thing of the Day: Pink Batman!

Pink Batman
All Photos By Gail

Like all of the colorful, cast acyclic resin sculpture’s by artist Sam Tufnell, Dadadadadadada (2017) sits on a lighted pedestal to create a wildly appealing glow that really sets the work off. We spotted Pink Batman and his friends (see photo below) in the booth for Castle Fitizjohn Gallery at Art New York / Context Art Fairs at Pier 94. Below is the full work, which is a unique piece that sells for $5,500.

Dadadadadadada

Parrots Tile Mosaic in the Fifth Avenue Subway

Parrots Tile Mosaic
All Photos By Gail

If you happen to take the N, R or Q trains to the Fifth Avenue and 59th Street stop on your way to the Central Park Zoo, be sure to first participate in the underground Subway Art Safari that’s going on in the station, as you will not only encounter this colorful flock of Parrots, but also tiles mosaic murals of Penguins, Horses, Monkeys and other creatures.

Parrots Tile Mosaic Full

Modern Art Monday Presents: The Adoration of The Calf By Francis Picabia

The Adoration of The Calf
Photo By Gail

The frightening central figure in this painting by Francis Picabia is taken from a Surrealist photograph by the young photographer Erwin Blumenfeld. The source image in The Adoration of The Calf (1941-42), which was reproduced in the Paris press in 1938, features the head of a dead calf posed atop a classical torso draped with fabric, and possibly refers to Hitler. To Blumenfeld’s composition, Picabia added a series of dramatically lit, expressionistically painted hands, many of which are splayed open in gestures of entreaty. They seem to emerge from the bottom of the canvas, suggesting the presence of bodies just out of sight. Although Picabia was a resolutely apolitical artist, it is difficult not to read this painting, and its cynical vision of the worship of false idols, as an engagement with contemporary politics.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC as part of the Exhibit Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round So Our Thoughts Can Change Direction.

Art on The High Line: Jon Rafman, The Swallower Swallowed

Swallowed
All Photos By Gail

The videos and sculptures Jon Rafman (b. 1981)s are comprised of images constantly swallowing one another, much in the way that we consume media ourselves every day. In his commission for the High Line, Rafman presents a sculpture that takes the form of a circle of autophagous animals including a Dog, a Whale, a Lizard, possibly a Pig, and a Human all looped into a speculative food chain.

Jon Rafman’s The Swallower Swallowed is part of the Group Show Mutations, and it will be on view at the High Line Park, West of 10th Avenue right at 23rd Street, Through March of 2018.

Swallowed