Tag Archive | Art

Brainwashed: New Works and Old Favorites By Mr. Brainwash at Taglialatella Galleries

Installation View with Horse
All Photos By Gail

You might recall that last summer we made three or four unsuccessful attempts (before finally lucking out with our timing) to see the massive Mr. Brainwash Life is Beautiful pop-up exhibit, which was located under the High Line at 14th Street for a few months. Seriously, that shit was just never, ever open.

New York Word

Fortunately, this summer’s Mr. Brainwash “Happening” is at a legitimate art gallery with a real address and clearly-posted hours of operation and everything! Yay! In fact, Brainwashed, which opened at Taglialatella Galleries on August 18th, unofficially christened the gallery’s new two-level, 5,000 square foot space at 229 Tenth Avenue, adjacent to its long-time home at 231Tenth Avenue (between 23rd and 24th). The new space is being treated as a pop-up venue until the gallery takes over full occupation of the new building in November.

Smile
Smile!

Cold beverages for the evening were provide by Stella Artois, who has partnered with the gallery for future events, to make sure we can get a buzz on while enjoying the art! Stella!

Stella Artois Print

The Stella Artois brand identity could be seen on various exhibited artworks, and the new collection also features an exclusive, limited-edition Stella Artois print, available only at Taglialatella Galleries.

Beatles 1965
Beatles 1965

Beatles 1966
Beatles 1966

Hey look: Brainwash is still making portraits of (mostly dead) Rock Stars from bits of broken vinyl records. It. Never. Gets. Old.

Bucket Heart
Bucket Heart

Here’s what’s great about a Mr. Brainwash exhibit: Just because we’ve seen it all before doesn’t mean it’s not fun to see it all again! Also: free alcohol!

Maxspray
Maxspray

This piece references the classic ’80s Maxell Tape ad (the UK version of which featured Peter Murphy of Bauhaus – TRIVIA!) and mashes it up with the iconic Brainwash-ala-Warhol Campbell’s Soup Spray Can. So. Many. Influences.

Pink Kate Moss
Pink Kate Moss

It’s interesting to note that this sparkly portrait of Supermodel  Kate Moss veryvery closely resembles the work of Russell Young, who’s also occasionally represented by Taglialatella.

Marilyn
Marilyn

Even though I could easily live without ever, ever again seeing this ubiquitous portrait of Marilyn Monroe appropriated and recycled for the million-billionth time by any artist, I do like the soft pastel colors on this version. He has another with colors that recall the cover of that Police album, the title of which I am too lazy to look-up. You know the one I am talking about, though.

David Bowie
David Bowie as Aladdin Sane

Bowie, yeah, I like it.

More Art Upstairs

There’s More Art Upstairs! Also, Pinkness!

Brainwash Kitchen

Someone needs to give this kitchen a good scrubbing.

Mickey and Lennon

Mickey Mouse made of recycled vintage tin signage. Just behind him, John Lennon gets another vinyl record treatment.

Stella Spray

Brainwashed will run through October 16th, 2016.

Store Front

Modern Art Monday: Dan Flavin, Untitled (to the “Innovator” of Wheeling Peachblow)

Untitled to the Innovator of Wheeling Peachblow
All Photos By Gail

Dan Flavin (1933 – 1996) began to use commercially available fluorescent light tubes in 1963. This work marries color and light, bringing them into three dimensions. In dialogue withe surrounding space, the vertical and horizontal tubes both illuminate and obscure the corner — a location not typically used for displaying art. Though the emitted light transcends its physical encasement and transforms the surrounding space, Flavin avoided characterizing his work as sublime and instead considered his light installation as “situations” or proposals. “One might not think of light as a matter of fact, but I do,” he stated. “And it is…as plain and open and direct an art as you will ever find.”

Untitled to the Innovator of Wheeling Peachblow

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Anatomically Correct Male Mannequins in Park Ave South Store Front

Male Manequinns Store Front
All Photos By Gail

A group of nine naked male mannequins has appeared in an empty Gramercy Park storefront. I noticed them for the first time a couple of weeks ago, when I was on my way to a dentist appointment in the area and happened to exit the 6 Train on East 22nd Street — directly adjacent to the storefront.

Anatomically Correct Male Mannequins

I didn’t have my camera with me at that time, but I had it when I was in the neighborhood today!

Anatomically Correct Male Mannequins 2

The statues, by New York City-based artist Richard Dupont, are somewhat larger than life-size and portray the male form in anatomically accurate proportions. Originally on display in Midtown’s Lever House, their current home is within a block of a preschool and a secondary school. I am almost surprised that they were still there, to be honest; considering how prudish people can be when they are exposed to a peen.

Anatomically Correct Male Mannequins 3

The art installation, visible through the newly installed plate-glass windows of the ground-floor of the former Church Missions House, will be on display throughout the summer. Built in 1892, the seven-story Gothic structure was bought by Aby Rosen’s RFR Realty last year for $50 million with plans to convert to a single-tenant office building with ground-floor retail space.

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Cluster: A Group Show of Groupings at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Art By Dylan Egon
Art By Dylan Egon (All Photos By Gail)

Jonathan LeVine Gallery’s Summer Group Show, Cluster, features work by established artists who have previously shown at the gallery, alongside emerging talent making their JLG debut. Each has been allocated space to display clusters of work, a concept that can be approached in many unique ways, and which grants each artist the opportunity to show the full range of their aesthetic.

Art by Ron English
Art by Ron English

While some have chosen to display groupings of work that are similar or create one large piece surrounded by smaller works, others interpreted the idea of “cluster” and used it as source of inspiration.

Art By Gary Taxali
Art By Gary Taxali

Similar to an art fair, in which pieces of varying mediums and styles are shown beside each other, Cluster includes sculptures, drawings and paintings by fifteen artists who might not typically be exhibited together, including Amandine Urruty, Anton Vill, Ben Tolman, Charlie Immer, Drew Leshko, Dylan Egon, Gary Mellon, Gary Taxali, Luke O’Sullivan, Marco Mazzoni, Nicomi Nix Turner, Ron English, Sam Gibbons, Smithe One, Tran Nguyen and Troy Coulterman. Let’s check out more photos from the opening reception!

Art By Luke O'Sullivan
Art By Luke O’Sullivan

Art By Luke O'Sullivan Detail
Luke O’Sullivan Sculpture Detail

Art By Nikomi Nix Turner
Art By Nikomi Nix Turner

The Brotherhood By Nikomi Nix Turner
The Brotherhood By Nikomi Nix Turner

Spongebob Grin by Ron English
Spongebob Grin by Ron English

Snake By Amandine Urruty
Snake By Amandine Urruty

The complex, surrealist drawings of Amandine Urruty are new to me. I really love the retro-creepiness of her style.

Smile By Amandine Urruty
Smile By Amandine Urruty

Carrot By Amandine Urruty
Carrot By Amandine Urruty

Floating Bell by Troy Coulterman
Floating Bell (Edition of 7) by Troy Coulterman

The Couple by Troy Coulterman
The Couple by Troy Coulterman

Charlie Immer Cluster
Art by Charlie Immer

Charlie Immer Coiled
Coiled by Charlie Immer

Skulls + Cuteness = A Perfect Match!

Art By Smithe One
Art By Smithe One

DBF By Smithe One
DBF By Smithe One

This piece reminds me of the cover of This Classic Album.

Cluster: A Group Show of Groupings will be on exhibit only through August 20th, 2016 at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street. in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Cluster Exhibit Signage

Jonathan LeVine Signage

Modern Art Monday Presents: Artist’s Shit No. 014 By Piero Manzoni

Artists Shit
All Photos By Gail

Piero Manzoni (July 13, 1933 – February 6, 1963) was an Italian artist best known for his ironic approach to avant-garde art. His work is widely seen as a critique of the mass production and consumerism that was changing Italian society (the Italian economic miracle) after World War II. In 1961, Manzoni created Artist’s Shit (Italian: Merda d’artista), an artwork that consists of 90 small tin cans, each filled with 1.1 oz of feces, and measuring 1.9″ × 2.6″, with a label in Italian, English, French, and German stating:

Artist’s Shit
Contents 30 gr net
Freshly preserved
Produced and tinned
in May 1961

The tins were originally to be valued according to their equivalent weight in gold – $37 each in 1961 – with the price fluctuating according to the market. The contents of the cans remain a much-disputed enigma, since opening them would destroy the value of the artwork. Various theories about the contents have been proposed, including speculation that it is plaster. Over the years, the cans have spread to various art collections all over the world and netted large prices, far outstripping inflation. A tin was sold for €124,000 at Sotheby’s on May 23, 2007; in October 2008 tin 83 was offered for sale at Sotheby’s and sold for £97,250. On October 16, 2015, tin 54 was sold at Christies for the astonishing sum of £182,500.

Piero Manzoni died of myocardial infarction in his Milan studio on February 6, 1963 at just 29 years of age. His contemporary, Ben Vautier, signed Manzoni’s death certificate, declaring it a work of art.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Artists Shit

Duke A. Barnstable NYC Street Sheriff

Duke A Barnstable Stars
All Photos By Gail

We haven’t seen much of the lo-fi work of street artist Duke A. Barnstable around the Chelsea Gallery District until we spotted these assorted star-shaped NYC Street Sheriff badges plastered on an electrical box near the northwest corner of 10th Avenue and 20th Street.

Duke A Barnstable Stars

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