Tag Archive | Art

Modern Art Monday Presents: Amedeo Modigliani, The Jewess

The Jewess
Photo By Gail

In titling this painting The Jewess (1908), one of the first that Modigliani exhibited, the artist declared that the sitter’s cultural identity was more important than her name. The model was most likely Modigliani’s lover, Maud Abrantes. Beyond her pallor, she is depicted with a withdrawn, languid demeanor, her cheeks and deeply set eyes touched with startling tabs of green, a streak of which also highlights the ridge of the patrician, aquiline nose. A curious pale mark obscures the area between her eyes, further isolating and drawing attention to her nose

This emphasis on the nose recurs throughout Modigliani’s work and is a focal point of his sculpture. It is s self-referential facet of his own Jewishness — an identity that his daughter later recalled as being deeply important to him. Modigliani’s exploration of his Jewish identity, as a central aspect of his portraiture, has been little noticed.

Photographed in the Jewish Museum in NYC as part of the Exhibit Modigliani Unmasked, which Continues Through February 4th, 2018.

Advertisements

Lakwena’s Lift You Higher Mural at Houston and Bowery

Lift You Higher
Photos By Gail

Back in October of 2017, a new work by London-based artist, Lakwena Mciver took over the Bowery Mural Wall, located at the intersection of Houston and Bowery. The colorful, kaleidescopic piece, which reads Lift You Higher, is actually part of a marketing stunt for Instagram’s #KindComments campaign, in partnership with Goldman Properties, which owns and curates the wall.

Lift You Higher

As part of the campaign, Instagram is working with artists to turn walls around the world into murals that spread kindness through uplifting art. Instagram encourages its users to take photos or videos of the walls, and share #KindComments “to make someone’s day.” Lakwena Maciver is just the fourth woman of 22 artists who have been commissioned to work on the wall.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Henri Laurens, The Guitar

The Guitar
Photo By Gail

Musical references permeate Cubist painting and sculpture. The guitar, which Picasso depicted often, is one of the movement’s most recognizable motifs. Like a Cubist painting, Henri Laurens‘ painted terracotta sculpture, The Guitar (1919), blurs, even inverts, the relationship between solids and voids; solids appear to recede, while voids assume physical presence. This effect is particularly apparent in the depiction of the sound hole and strings on the face of the guitar.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Manierre Dawson, Meeting (The Three Graces)

Meeting (The Three Graces)
Photo By Gail

In 1910, Manierre Dawson (1887-1969) spent six months traveling throughout England, France, Germany, Switzerland and Italy, where he visited museums, collectors and archeological sites. Following this sojourn, he created a series of works in 1911 – 12 based on images from classical art and Old Master paintings. With Meeting (The Three Graces), (1912) he reinterprets the mythological subject of the Three Graces by painting in a manner from both Cubism and Italian Futurism. Although Dawson did not receive much recognition during his lifetime, his avante-garde work was at the forefront of American art at the time.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Os Gemeos with JR Collaborative Mural on Chrystie Street

Os Gemeos and JR Mural
All Photos By Gail

One thing leads to another, as they say. I was actually in the middle of an urban Art Safari for this project when I looked west across Chrystie Street and saw something that looked very familiar to me.

Os Gemeos and JR Mural

The interwebs tell me that back in August of 2015, the Brazilian twin aritsts Os Gemeos joined up with French wheat-paster JR to decorate the brick facade of 199 Chrystie Street. You can see the three trademark Os Gemeos characters: two interacting with / tagging the architecture, with one holding up a sign bearing JR’s signature eyeball graphic. Fun!

Os Gemeos and JR Mural

A reminder to look up more often!

Os Gemeos

This Mural is Located at 199 Chrystie Street, LES, NYC.

Modern Art Modern Presents: Burgoyne Diller, Second Theme

Second Theme
Photo By Gail

Influenced by Piet Mondrian’s work from the 1910s and 1920s, American artist Burgoyne Diller (1906 – 1965) devised his own abstract formats in the 1930s. Divided into groups called “First,  Second, and Third Themes,” Diller’s three series explore the sense of movement generated by different arrangements of geometric forms within a square.  Second Theme pictures, such as this one (1938 -40), feature a grid system with rectangular bands of differing widths extending across the canvas.

Photographed the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Painterly Architectonic By Lyubov Popova

Painterly Architectonic
Photo By Gail

In 1919, Lyubov Popova (1889- 1924) described painting as “Construction,”  the building blocks of which were color and line. In this work, Painterly Architectonic (1917), brightly colored, irregularly shaped planes are layered are layered against a neutral background. The curved bottom edge of a grey shape emerging from beneath a red triangle and a white trapezoid suggests three-dimensionality, while the vibrant colors and jutting edges  that seem to extend beyond the frame evoke energetic movement. Painterly Architectonic is one of a series of works that Popova created between 1915 and 1919 is response to Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematist paintings.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.