Tag Archive | NYC

Don’t Call Me “Sir”

Sir Sign
Photo By Gail

Photographed outside the Holiday Cocktail Lounge located at 75 St. Mark’s Place in NYC.

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Army of One Memorial Mural, First Street Green, NYC

Army of One Mural
Photos By Gail

This wall mural, located at the First Street Green Art Park, in NYC’s east village pays tribute to the late firefighter and street artist Jef Campion, aka Army of One.

Army of One Mural Detail Sign
Explanatory Tag by Fumero

Army of One Mural Detail
Army of One Mural Detail

Two of Campion’s signature images are featured on the mural. One is the very recognizabe Bride of Frankenstein, while another is Grenade Boy, which Campion appropriated from Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C. (1962), possibly the most famous photograph by Diane Arbus. Suffering from PTSD, along with the physical affects of having been a 9/11 first responder, Jef Campion took his own life in January of 2014, at the age of just 52. RIP.

Man in The Moon-Inspired Iron Gate

Man in the Moon Gate
Photos By Gail

Check out this cool custom gate that caught my eye as I was walk around in Chelsea the other day: the design is based on the iconic image of the Man in the Moon (with a space capsule embedded through one eye) from the 1902 French adventure film, A Trip to the Moon.

Spotted on 21st Street between 8th and 9th Avenues in Chelsea, NYC.

Man in the Moon Gate

Peanuts Street Art Mash Up By André

Snoopy and Mr A
Photo By Gail

Swedish graffiti artist André (André Saraiva, AKA Monsieur André or Mr. A) revists a classic Peanuts comic strip scenario as Snoopy interacts with  Saraiva’s signature stick-figure doodle, Mr. A, on the wall of a downtown parking lot.

Part of The Peanuts Global Artist Collective, This Piece was Spotted at 304 Hudson Street at Spring Street in SoHo, NYC.

Vandal Gummy Bear on Stanton Street

WhIsBe Gummy Bear
Photo By Gail

Here’s well-preserved example of anonymous street artist WhIsBe’s Vandal Gummy series, for which he places an image of a Candy Gummy Bear against a Prison Mugshot Background. According to the artist’s Wiki page, “The juxtaposition between the harshness of the Department of Corrections and the innocence of the piece of candy encourages viewers to examine institutions and has become a hallmark of WhIsBe’s body of work.”

Photographed at 19 Stanton Street, Just East of Chrystie Street, LES, NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pinky and The Brain Graffiti Truck

Pinky and The Brain Box Truck
Photo By Gail

This colorful box truck decorated with graffiti and a terrific image of Pinky and The Brain was spotted on East 14th Street near First Avenue.

The text on the truck says, “Tell a friend to tell a friend that it’s them again…”

Yinka Shonibare MBE: Wind Sculpture (SG) I in Central Park

Yinka Shonibare MBE Wind Sculpture
All Photos By Gail

I went up to Central Park on a recent Sunday to check out the latest Public Art Fund-sponsored large scale sculpture, which is  Yinka Shonibare MBE’s Wind Sculpture (SG) I, installed on March 7th in the Doris C. Freedman Plaza. Unfortunately, and likely in an attempt to keep people from climbing on the monumental artwork, the park had grouped a number metal crowd barriers around the base of the sculpture on all sides, which seriously hindered my ability to get really great photos. Still, I did my best.

Yinka Shonibare MBE Wind Sculpture

One of Britain’s best- known contemporary artists, Yinka Shonibare (b 1962, London) spent his childhood between England and Nigeria. He settled permanently in London in the early 1980s, where he attended art school. Shonibare regards himself as a cultural hybrid, a product of complex and layered relationships forged by centuries of global trade, migration, politics, and cultural exchange. His work reflects these currents in ways that often playfully invite us to look beyond appearances and assumption about identity.

Yinka Shonibare MBE Wind Sculpture

Wind Sculpture (SG) I takes on the paradoxical task of manifesting the invisible. We can’t see the wind, but we do see its effects. Here, the dynamic movement of a piece of fabric in a gust of wind is rendered in solid fiberglass on monumental scale. Covered with an intricate pattern, the 23-foot-tall sculpture rises above the plaza, reminiscent of the untethered sail of a ship billowing in the breeze. Its unique, hand-painted pattern in turquoise, red, and orange — colors that the artist associates with his childhood on the beaches of Lagos  —  is inspired by Dutch wax batik print, which Shonibare has called the “perfect metaphor for multilayered identities.”

Yinka Shonibare MBE Wind Sculpture

Wind Sculpture is the first work in a second generation — thus (SG)1 — of his celebrated series and continues Shonibare’s ongoing examination of the construction of cultural identity through the lens of colonialism. The work creates an opportunity to reflect on social issues associated with our current moment, including the movement of people and ideas across borders and the role of monuments in heterogeneous societies.

Yinka Shonibare MBE Wind Sculpture

Yinka Shonibare MBE Wind Sculpture

This sculpture is unbelievably gorgeous and looks different from every angle. Next time I am in the area I will see if the eyesore barriers are gone, and if so I will add new photos to the post!

Yinka Shonibare’s Wind Sculpture (SG) I Will Be On View Through October 14th, 2018 at Doris C. Freedman Plaza, Located at the Southeast Entrance to Central Park (5th Avenue and 60th Street), NYC.

Yinka Shonibare MBE Wind Sculpture