Tag Archive | Light Sculpture

Dan Flavin, Corners, Barriers and Corridors at David Zwirner

Untitled (To Barry, Mike, Chuck and Leonard) 1972 - 1975
Untitled (To Barry, Mike, Chuck and Leonard) 1972 – 1975 (All Photos By Gail)

Dan Flavin (April 1, 1933 – November 29, 1996) was an American minimalist artist famous for creating gorgeous sculptural objects and installations from commercially available fluorescent light fixtures. David Zwirner Gallery which represents Flavin’s estate, is currently hosting an exhibition of the artist’s significant Corner, Barrier and Corridor works from the late 1960s and early 1970s at its West 20th Street in New York. This is a must-see exhibit.

The exhibition at David Zwirner examines how Flavin established and redefined space through light constructions in three formats that were at the core of his practice. The artist’s “corner,” “barrier” and “corridor” works explicitly implicate their surrounding architecture while physically mediating the viewers’ experience and perception of space.

Untitled (to Sonja) 1969
Above and Below: Untitled (to Sonja), 1969

Among the works on view will be a notable two-part Barrier in yellow and green dedicated to his wife, Untitled (to Sonja), 1969, which was first shown as Flavin’s contribution to the significant group exhibition Spaces at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1969-70.

Untitled (to Sonja) 1969

Flavin’s installation comprised rectangular units of colored fluorescent tubes that formed two interior barriers that begin in the corners of the entrance wall and extend to the far end of the room, altering space with colored light and physically modifying the visitors’ experience of the room. This will be the first time it has been shown since the MoMA exhibition.

To Dorothy and Roy Lichtenstein,

Also in the exhibition is a rare barrier that shines white fluorescent light into an empty room while rendering it inaccessible: Untitled (to Dorothy and Roy Lichtenstein on not seeing anyone in the room), 1968. This piece was first shown at the Dwan Gallery, New York, in 1968 and has not been exhibited since 1970. The work’s title makes reference to a 1961 painting by Roy Lichtenstein entitled I Can See The Whole Room!…And There’s Nobody in It!

Untitled (To Barry, Mike, Chuck and Leonard) 1972 - 1975

A Corridor in Yellow and Pink fluorescent light from 1972-75, Untitled (to Barry, Mike, Chuck and Leonard), will also be presented. The work divides an architectural passageway into two mutually inaccessible, obstructed fields of color and light, playing on the viewers’ cognitive and physical perception of distinctly colored, opposite ends of the same space.

Untitled (To Barnett Newman) Two 1971

The show will also feature a room devoted to a sequence of four related corner constructions dedicated to the artist Barnett Newman: Untitled (to Barnett Newman) one-four, 1971, which highlight the four corners of the room by serially investigating the same rectangular form in different configurations of yellow, red, and blue fluorescent light. These works have not been on view in the United States since their first presentation in Flavin’s 1971 solo exhibition at the Dwan Gallery, New York.

Untitled (to a man, George McGovern) 2, 1972

Another work in the exhibition features the artist’s less-known use of circular light fixtures: Untitled (to a man, George McGovern) 2, from 1972, succinctly illuminates the corners of a given space in its wall-mounted triangular construction of warm white circular lamps.

Untitled (to a man, George McGovern) 2, 1972

Dan Flavin, Corners, Barriers and Corridors will be on Exhibit Through October 24th, 2015 at David Zwirner Gallery, Located at 537 West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Untitled (to Virgina Dwan) 1971
Untitled (to Virgina Dwan), 1971

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Leo Villareal’s Chasing Rainbow

Chasing Rainbow1
All Photos By Gail

You know, I am such a sucker for anything that lights up, and I was utterly captivated by Chasing Rainbow, an LED sculpture on exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum. The circuitry behind the lighting allows it to change color and patterns continuously, but of course I wanted to capture as much pink as possible!

Chasing Rainbow 2

Video Clip of the Week: Plaid, “Wallet”



It’s hard to believe that the electronica duo, Plaid have been around almost as long as I’ve been writing about music. And yet, it’s true.

Plaid released its latest album, Reachy Prints (Warp Records) in mid-May along with this hypnotic video for the track “Wallet,” which was directed by Sabrina Ratté. Ratté offers that, “the video is inspired by the idea of creating a world based on memories, where things seem real but they are in fact a construction of the mind. All the images are made from electronic signals, from which were created a reproduction of a sun, different landscapes and cities. The musical composition induced the vision of bright colors and daylight atmosphere, so the simulated sunlight became a central element of the video, thus creating dazed images where everything is diffused and hard to grasp.”

Plaid Adds:
“We wondered if consciousness is a memory and what role memories have in the imaginative process . We saw prints as physical memories and an equivalence between printing and memory function. They often share the aim of ‘reproducing’ a subject as accurately as possible. Experience told us that a perfect reproduction is difficult, if not impossible. An attraction to explore this fallibility and a curiosity about the potential inaccuracies and artifacts gave us the album title, Reachy Prints. The track ‘Wallet’ is inspired by the items found in wallets, the money, receipts, business cards, photos etc and the symbolism of wallets as a safe place to store items we value and want to remember. Most items in a wallet have already been digitized and perhaps physical wallets/purses will become obsolete.”

Personally, I dig its minimalist “Light Sculpture” visuals and the Sunday Morning lull of the track’s gentle, pulsating beats. Plaid are on tour in the US for handful of dates in July, which you can find listed below. Enjoy!

NORTH AMERICAN TOUR DATES
July 3 @ Lincoln Hall – Chicago, IL
July 4 @ TBA
July 6 @ The Roxy – Los Angeles, CA
July 10 @ The Parish – Austin, TX
July 11 @ 1015 Folsom – San Francisco, CA
July 12 @ Fortune Sound Club – Vancouver, BC
July 18 @ Le Poisson Rouge – New York, NY

Plaid Reach Prints Cover Art

Paul Kolker’s Halftones and Ishidots…The New Abstract!

Paul Kolker Signage
All Photos By Gail

At his eponymous gallery on West 25th Street, painter/sculptor Paul Kolker has launched his return to both abstract painting and light sculpture with his yearlong series entitled The New Abstract!. This is an exhibit that we literally stumbled onto during our May 1st art crawl, and what a cool find it turned out to be!

Paul Kolker: Ishidots Circulare Blanc, OP.1, 2014,
Ishidots Circulare Blanc, OP.1, 2014

Paul Kolker is known for his light sculptures and also his paintings and prints incorporating rectilinear grids of dots, halftone phases and curvilinear patterns of multivariate dots; the latter which he calls Ishidots in attribution to Shinobu Ishihara. When you first enter the downstairs gallery space, you’ll pass through a corridor lined with these circular, dot-field paintings that reminded me of those Color Blindness tests. I liked them immediately.

Ishidots Circulare Noir, OP.1, 2014,
Ishidots Circulare Noir, OP.1, 2014

In both paintings the dots are painted in the same hues; but those on the black ground appear more saturated and emboldened, “like bright stars in a black night sky.”

Paul Kolker Light Sculpture

In this cool sculpture, curved mirrors reflect, distort and thereby abstract light into infinity.

Big Dot Painting

Here’s a really big one! The perfect background for a selfie!

Mylar Ballons on the Ceiling

In the same room as the Big Dots painting, this Factory-esque Silver Mylar Balloon Sculpture covers an area of the ceiling.

Paul Kolker Art

The group of paintings above and below are each on a wall that features four paintings in total. But I was shooting with a big clumsy iPad and to get a wide angle you practically have to back up to New Jersey, so you’ll have to visit the exhibit in person to see what I had to crop out. Trust me, it will be worth it.

Paul Kolker Art

Paul Kolker: Halftones and Ishidots…The New Abstract! is on Exhibit Through July 3rd, 2014 at the Paul Kolker Collection, Located at 511 West 25th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.