Tag Archive | Sculpture

The Dig of No Body (Soil Sample) By Mariechen Danz, on The High Line

The Dig of No Body
All Photo By Gail

Mariechen Danz (b. 1980, Dublin, Ireland) is a Berlin-based artist who researches representations of the body, investigating the way it has been given meaning in various cultures, epochs, and fields of knowledge. In her installations, performances and music, often in collaboration with other artists and musicians, the human body emerges as a contradictory structure and a scene of conflict — an utterly contaminated zone, both politically and historically.

The Dig of No Body Detail
Torso Section, Detail

For the High Line, Danz presents a new iteration of The Dig of No Body, a sculpture that references anatomical learning models segregated into individual parts, like a life-sized soil sample in movable layers.

The Dig of No Body Detail
Arm Section, Detail

The work evokes our changing relationship to the earth, as well as the popular contemporary name “Anthropocene,” which suggests humans’ creation of a new geological era.

The Dig of No Body

The Dig of No Body is Part of the Group Exhibition Agora, On Display Along The High Line Through March of 2019.

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Monumental Sculptures By Tony Cragg on The Park Avenue Malls

Runner By Tony Cragg
All Photos By Gail

It’s not always easy to keep up with all of the Public Art installed in and around Manhattan at any given time, but I stumbled on the piece above, a towering, abstract white and cream fiberglass structure entitled Runner (2017), by sculptor Tony Cragg, when I visited the Park Avenue Armory for Nick Cave’s The Let Go installion. Runner is right out front of the Armory at the corner of 67th Street. When I left the Armory, I snapped a few additional shots of Runner before heading back down town.

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street

Runner is one of five monumental, abstract sculptures by Cragg, which present an opportunity for a leisurely stroll over nearly 20 blocks on this almost suburban Manhattan thoroughfare. The commanding sculptures exemplify Cragg’s experimentation with a variety of materials include the aforementioned fiberglass, stainless steel and bronze.

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street

Runner with the Park Avenue Armory in the Background.

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street
Runner, Detail

On the 4th of July, I decided to get some exercise and walk from 52nd to 79th Streets to check out the other four Cragg sculptures. Please enjoy my photos!

Mean Average, 2013, Park Avenue at East 52nd Street

Mean Average, at 52nd Street, is a weighty composition made of bronze.

Mean Average, 2013, Park Avenue at East 52nd Street

I tried to shoot each of the sculptures from a variety of angles.

Mean Average, 2013, Park Avenue at East 52nd Street

You can get such a different impression of the work, depending on your perspective.

Elliptical Column, 2012, Park Avenue at East 57th Street

Elliptical Column at 57th Street is a nearly 20-foot tall spire made of shiny, almost liquid-like stainless steel.

Elliptical Column, 2012, Park Avenue at East 57th Street

Elliptical Column, 2012, Park Avenue at East 57th Street

Hammerhead, 2017, Park Avenue at East 72nd Street

The same white and cream fiberglass used for Runner is also used for Hammerhead at  72nd Street, and the brightness allows the sculpture to really pop against the surrounding landscape.

Hammerhead, 2017, Park Avenue at East 72nd Street

Hammerhead, 2017, Park Avenue at East 72nd Street

Tommy, 2013, Park Avenue at East 79th Street

At 79th Street, the artist uses bronze again for Tommy, which has a blue-green patina. The vertical forms seemingly defy gravity while giving the impression of upward motion and kinetic energy, though they are static.

Tommy, 2013, Park Avenue at East 79th Street

This exhibition is presented in association with the Fund for Park Avenue  and Marian Goodman Gallery.

Tony Cragg’s Monumental Sculptures will be on Exhibit along Manhattan’s Park Avenue Malls at the intersections of 52nd Street, 57th Street, 67th Street, 72nd Street, and 79th Streets Through October 31st, 2018.

Urs Fischer, Things at Gagosian Gallery Pop Up Space

Things Front View
All Photos By Gail

The Gagosian Gallery chose an empty storefront at the the southeast corner or Fifth Avenue and 43rd Street for a Pop Up exhibit by Swiss artist Urs Fisher. The ad hoc gallery space contained exactly one work of art, a life-size Aluminum Rhinoceros entitled Things, whose form is adorned with an array of familiar, functional objects, ranging from a toilet to a handbag. The objects are either imbedded in the hide of the great beast, or they seem to float on its surface, as if attracted by a magnetic force. I went to check out Things on the penultimate day of its exhibition, which happened to be after work on a Friday.

Things Back and Right Side

Here’s some background on Things, and its meaning, from the Gagosian website:

“Amid the bustle of midtown Manhattan, a rhinoceros can be glimpsed through tall, arched windows at street level. Various man-made objects — including a copy machine, a car door, a handbag, a vacuum cleaner, a shovel, and a table — seem to float right through the creature, as if released from Earth’s gravitational pull.

Things Photocopier Detail

Carved out of aluminum, this barrage of incongruous items forms a single, continuous unit, anchored by the rhinoceros, which stands its ground. Produced at life size from a 3D scan of a taxidermy animal, its furrowed visage looms from a height of more than ten feet.

Things Back End

Things considers the ways that objects and forces — from plastic bottles and Wi-Fi signals to memories, history, and emotion — gather around and pass through our bodies as we move through the world, creating countless versions of reality that are specific to each of us.

Things Rear Leg Detail

Things Front and Right Side

Things Toilet

Like the rhinoceros, we absorb all that comes into our vicinity, and in the process we ourselves undergo a constant, often undetectable metamorphosis. Existence itself is thus presented as an accumulation, a collective gathering of physical and metaphorical baggage.

Things Right Rear

In his use of traditional materials and current technologies, Urs Fischer’s art tests the boundaries of possibility and perception. He has used clay, steel, wax, bread, dirt, vegetables, and fruit, among other substances, often to extreme paradoxical visual effect, revealing a keen attunement to the infinite mutability of image and form. The vicissitudes of objecthood are further complicated when Fischer’s sculptures are installed outside of the typical white-walled gallery.

Things Back Detail

In a courtyard, a vacated bank, an open field, his extroverted works have acted as portals into the uncanny. Here, the portal opens right between Grand Central Terminal and Bryant Park. An extraordinary creature made up of ordinary parts, Things transports unsuspecting passersby, if just for a moment, into a world that is at once prehistoric, digital, and mysteriously uncharted.

Things Head Detail

Things was produced in a series of three identical pieces, and all three have been sold to private collectors.

Things Front and Left Side

Anselm Kiefer’s Uraeus Sculpture at Rockefeller Center

Anselm Kiefer Uraeus Front View With Flowers
All Photos By Gail  (Thanks to Dave Manilow for The Tip on How to Get This Great Shot!)

Memorial Day Monday was not the hoped-for sunny day here in NYC, and the grey sky with threat to rain lent itself to indoor activities like Museum visits! Thus, I was inspired to head out to the Museum of Modern Art, followed by a short walk downtown to Rockefeller Center to see the new summer public artwork. This year’s monumental work is the first site-specific outdoor public sculpture ever to be commissioned for the United States from German artist Anselm Kiefer (b. 1945). Entitled Uraeus, the work consists of a gigantic open book with eagle’s wings 30 feet in span, both made of lead, on top of a 20-foot-tall lead-clad stainless steel column.

Uraeus Left Front with Pedestal

Clustered around the base of the column are further oversize lead books, while a large snake coils up the column (you can see the snake’s head rising up over the bottom edge of the open book). Lead is one of Kiefer’s preferred materials for its soft, fluid properties that are traditionally associated with alchemical transformation.

Anselm Kiefer Uraeus Side Front View

These photos will give you a better view of the statues platform with books scattered about, though it is not easy to get a shot without lots of people coming and going.

Uraeus Front with Pedestal

The sculpture’s cryptic title, Uraeus, refers to the erect shape of the Egyptian cobra, associated with the serpent goddess Wadjet and a symbol of power and divine authority. The wings evoke the headdresses and necklaces worn by Egyptian royalty in homage to the vulture goddess Nekhbet. Wadjet and Nekhbet were the guardians of Lower and Upper Egypt, respectively, and following ancient Egypt’s unification, became the joint patrons of the civilization. You can read more about the philosophy behind the sculpture at This Link.

Anselm Kiefer Uraeus Rear View

This is what the piece looks like shot from the rear and facing Fifth Avenue.

Anselm Kiefer Uraeus Side Rear View

Uraeus is no Seated Ballerina, but it’s worth checking out if you are in the area!

Anselm Kiefer’s Uraeus will be on View Through Jul 22nd, 2018 (expect that tenure to be extended) at the Fifth Avenue entrance to Rockefeller Center’s Channel Gardens, between 49th and 50th Streets, in Midtown Manhattan.Anselm Kiefer Uraeus Front View With Flowers 2

Modern Art Monday Presents: Duane Hanson, Housewife

Housewife
Photo By Gail

Sculptor Duane Hanson (1925 – 1996) often identified the figures in his artworks by their occupation or social roles, rather than their names. His photorealistic sculptural portraits — cast from life, painted and dressed in clothes corresponding to their roles — are thus transformed into ethnographic types. Their positions subtly critique their social realities as well as the context of their display. Hanson’s typically lower-and-middle class characters are empathetically portrayed in private or mundane moments, and their appearance is at once startlingly present, yet distinctly at odds in a gallery setting, where they are encountered almost voyeuristically, thus amplifying their isolation.

Housewife Detail

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Like Life: Sculpture, Color and The Body, at The Met Breuer, NYC.

Housewife

Stations of The Cross: Station 13 at Trinity Church

Station of The Cross #13
Photo By Gail

Stations of the Cross is a public art project, weaving through 14 religious and secular art spaces from The Cloisters museum to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to Trinity Church and the 9/11 Memorial. The series breaks open the journey of Jesus, inviting people of all faiths to consider injustice across the human experience with a focus on the plight of immigrants and refugees. Station 13, Jesus is Taken Down From the Cross, is realized in Stations, 2016-18 by G. Roland Biermann, which can be found at the side courtyard between Trinity Church and Cemetery at Broadway and Wall Street in the financial district.

Station of The Cross #13

Sleek minimalism and gritty reality are seen in Biermann’s sculpture, in which two guardrails slice through the air, forming a fallen cross. Jesus‘ deposition finds a contemporary echo in the everyday tragedy of a car crash. Oil barrels suggest automobiles, but we might also think of olive oil, used in the Bible to anoint priests and cure the sick. Painted 14 shades of red — suggesting blood that runs, congeals, and quickens anew — the barrels evoke the Stations of The Cross as a whole. There might be consolation in the symbolism of Holy Blood and Holy Oil. Alternatively, we might think about the blood spilt in the pursuit of fossil fuels: our eagerness to import barrels of crude from the Middle East but unwillingness to accept refugees from that region. This sculpture is equal parts sacred and profane, ancient and contemporary.

Stations of the Cross Runs through Easter Sunday, April 1st, 2018. Visit a map of all fourteen installations, and plan your own journey at This Link.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Rubber House on an Exercise Bike

Trimcycle By Battle Creek
All Photos By Gail

Trimcycle By Battle Creek is the name of this sculpture, which is comprised of a Pink Silicone Rubber House draped over a vintage Exercise Bicycle. It is part of the exhibit Bent, by artist Brian Tolle, from his group series known collectively as Levittown.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

Here’s a bit more about the series from C24 Gallery:

A keen observer of domestic life and identity, Brian Tolle furthers his interest of politics of place in his Levittown sculptures. The sculptures are inspired by the planned housing community, Levittown: the historic town in Long Island, NY, which became the archetype of American suburban life in the early 1950s. Each of Tolle’s eleven sculptures is a precise scaled model of an original Levittown home — cast from the same mold, varying only in color and displaying the architectural details of the original structures.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

The sculptural houses themselves resemble deflated or melting membranes, and are supported by various appropriated mementos of suburban life – found toys, tire swing, shopping cart, a plastic nativity set, and a recliner. These iconographic items rest underneath and inside silicone rubber skins of the houses, emphasizing a dialogue between sites and domestic artifacts. As the title of the exhibition suggests, the artworks presented in Bent provoke a re-reading, or discord between reality and fiction. The formal play that Tolle visually articulates between shapes and textures, private and public spaces presents a challenge to standard architectural, as well as behavioral conventions and norms.

Photographed at the C24 Gallery in Manhattan.

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