Tag Archive | Sculpture

Stations of The Cross: Station 13 at Trinity Church

Station of The Cross #13
Photo By Gail

Stations of the Cross is a public art project, weaving through 14 religious and secular art spaces from The Cloisters museum to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to Trinity Church and the 9/11 Memorial. The series breaks open the journey of Jesus, inviting people of all faiths to consider injustice across the human experience with a focus on the plight of immigrants and refugees. Station 13, Jesus is Taken Down From the Cross, is realized in Stations, 2016-18 by G. Roland Biermann, which can be found at the side courtyard between Trinity Church and Cemetery at Broadway and Wall Street in the financial district.

Station of The Cross #13

Sleek minimalism and gritty reality are seen in Biermann’s sculpture, in which two guardrails slice through the air, forming a fallen cross. Jesus‘ deposition finds a contemporary echo in the everyday tragedy of a car crash. Oil barrels suggest automobiles, but we might also think of olive oil, used in the Bible to anoint priests and cure the sick. Painted 14 shades of red — suggesting blood that runs, congeals, and quickens anew — the barrels evoke the Stations of The Cross as a whole. There might be consolation in the symbolism of Holy Blood and Holy Oil. Alternatively, we might think about the blood spilt in the pursuit of fossil fuels: our eagerness to import barrels of crude from the Middle East but unwillingness to accept refugees from that region. This sculpture is equal parts sacred and profane, ancient and contemporary.

Stations of the Cross Runs through Easter Sunday, April 1st, 2018. Visit a map of all fourteen installations, and plan your own journey at This Link.

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Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Rubber House on an Exercise Bike

Trimcycle By Battle Creek
All Photos By Gail

Trimcycle By Battle Creek is the name of this sculpture, which is comprised of a Pink Silicone Rubber House draped over a vintage Exercise Bicycle. It is part of the exhibit Bent, by artist Brian Tolle, from his group series known collectively as Levittown.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

Here’s a bit more about the series from C24 Gallery:

A keen observer of domestic life and identity, Brian Tolle furthers his interest of politics of place in his Levittown sculptures. The sculptures are inspired by the planned housing community, Levittown: the historic town in Long Island, NY, which became the archetype of American suburban life in the early 1950s. Each of Tolle’s eleven sculptures is a precise scaled model of an original Levittown home — cast from the same mold, varying only in color and displaying the architectural details of the original structures.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

The sculptural houses themselves resemble deflated or melting membranes, and are supported by various appropriated mementos of suburban life – found toys, tire swing, shopping cart, a plastic nativity set, and a recliner. These iconographic items rest underneath and inside silicone rubber skins of the houses, emphasizing a dialogue between sites and domestic artifacts. As the title of the exhibition suggests, the artworks presented in Bent provoke a re-reading, or discord between reality and fiction. The formal play that Tolle visually articulates between shapes and textures, private and public spaces presents a challenge to standard architectural, as well as behavioral conventions and norms.

Photographed at the C24 Gallery in Manhattan.

Flight/Equip.: United Airlines 3480 E7W

Yes, It Exists: Deep Fried Toy Tanks

Deep Fried Toy Tank
Photos By Gail

This deep-fried toy tank is one of seven identical models that make up the artwork entitled Visual Art, Add Oil! March Forward! (19992005) by Chinese artist Zheng Guogu.

Deep Fried Toy Tanks

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Art and China After 1989 at the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Jeff Koons, Bluebird Planter

Koons Bluebird Planter
All Photos By Gail

As part of the gallery’s anniversary of 25 Years in business, David Zwirner on 20th Street is currently hosting an exhibit of works by a selection of the major artists it represents. Being a major Jeff Koons fan, my favorite piece in the show is Bluebird Planter: a piece from Koons‘ Banality series (2010 – 2016) created in the artists signature mirror-polished stainless steel, with a transparent color coating, and a space on top of the sculpture for live flowering plants.

Koons Bluebird Planter

The  Banality series consists of a number of large sculptures inspired by porcelain Hummel Figurines. I left a random art fan in this shot so you can see how large the sculpture is.

Koons Bluebird Planter

This sculpture had fake plants in its planter but you can get the idea. It is extremely gorgeous. Breathtaking even.

Koons Bluebird Planter

 

Modern Art Monday Presents: Henri Laurens, The Guitar

The Guitar
Photo By Gail

Musical references permeate Cubist painting and sculpture. The guitar, which Picasso depicted often, is one of the movement’s most recognizable motifs. Like a Cubist painting, Henri Laurens‘ painted terracotta sculpture, The Guitar (1919), blurs, even inverts, the relationship between solids and voids; solids appear to recede, while voids assume physical presence. This effect is particularly apparent in the depiction of the sound hole and strings on the face of the guitar.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Lee Sung-Kuen’s Interconnected at Waterfall Mansion

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected
All Photos By Gail

If you think you’ve been to every kind of cool art gallery in New York City, from the LES to Midtown, but you have not yet been to Waterfall Mansion, then now is a good time to add a visit to this uptown gem of an art destination to your bucket list. Waterfall Mansion, a Townhome only open to the public for a few hours each Saturday (and the rest of the week by appointment only) specializes in unique exhibits by Asian artists, really does have a two-story waterfall inside, but to really appreciate that distinguishing architectural feature you need to go in person.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Now through December 4th, Waterfall Mansion & Gallery presents Interconnected, the first major solo exhibition of renowned Korean artist, Lee Sung-KuenLee’s figurative works, which represent organic life and growth, are composed of thin, short-length wires and brightly colored knots.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

The netted steel volumes that he produces juxtapose the heaviness of metal and the light, creating a fluid dynamic between shape and space that both penetrates and expands the space the work inhabits.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

In an effort to harmonize material substance and immaterial space, Lee obliterates the distance between shape and space, and instead emphasizes the shifting mobility and elasticity of his pieces. In this way, the pieces do not form or become an object, but instead permeate and adapt to their surroundings, enriching the space around it and creating a unique sculpture of situation.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

The sculptures do feel very organic and can be seen as perhaps having been inspired by sea sponges and aquatic plants as well as microcosmic material.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

This cluster of three hanging sculptures reminded me of cocoons.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

The Waterfall Atrium is also filled with colorful suspended sculptures. The look a bit like jelly bean-shaped clouds.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

This piece is on the second floor and is the only one that is what I would call “representational.”

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

These look like a group of desert cacti.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

This fun exhibit is a good introduction to the Waterfall Mansion aesthetic. Try to make it uptown before the show ends on December 4th.

Waterfall Mansion and Gallery is Located at 170 East 80th Street (Between Third and Lex) in NYC. The Gallery is only open to the public on Saturdays from Noon – 5 PM, so plan accordingly. Visit This Link for more information.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected Detail

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Modern Art Monday Presents: Donald Judd, Untitled (1970) Stack Sculpture

Donald Judd Untitled Stack 1970
All Photos By Gail

Donald Judd (1928 – 1994) created his first vertical Stack Sculpture in 1965. Coincidentally, this was just one year before furniture designer Ettore Sottsass designed his Superebox cabinet series. At the time, Sottsass claimed to have been inspired from the radical materials and construction of Parisian fashion, but he late wrote about Judd and even named a table in homage to him.

Donald Judd Untitled Stack 1970 Detail
Untitled Stack Sculpture (1970) Detail

Sottsass and Judd each explored Minimalism and the effect of objects on their environment, but from strikingly different vantage points

Donald Judd Untitled Stack 1970 Detail

Judd’s sculptures use the language and materials of serial production and functionalist design, while Sottsass created functional objects with the aspiration of minimalist sculpture.

Donald Judd Untitled Stack 1970

Photographed in The Met Breuer Museum in NYC.