Tag Archive | Sculpture

Lars Fisk, Mr. Softee at Marlborough Gallery

Mr Softee Orb
All Photos By Gail

Chelsea’s Marlborough Gallery is currently hosting the first solo exhibit by New York-based artist Lars Fisk, presenting a group of seven of his signature ball sculptures. Ranging from pea-size to 15 feet in diameter, the works engage mundane subjects from pencil stubs to parking lots. These are fashioned, in their actual materials, into perfected spheres to re-define the object as sculpture. Made primarily by hand in the artist’s Red Hook Brooklyn studio, the sculptures function as a kind of logo for their subject, distilling and encapsulating the physical essence of an object.

Mr Softee Orb

Everyday objects, especially ones whose design is so perfected or irreducible as to preempt change, are among Fisk’s favorite subjects. Others are ubiquitous enough to go unheralded, and the artist is keen to ennoble them. In Fisk’s hands a New York City summer staple, the Mister Softee ice cream truck, becomes a symbol for the city itself — an avatar of freewheeling capitalism and boundless appetite.

Mr Softee Orb

Lot Ball
Lot Ball

While his vehicles have been popular subjects, the series actually originated with simpler sculptures of streets —asphalt spheres (a form with no beginning or end and the three dimensional equivalent of an allover composition) painted with yellow and white lines: an embodiment of movement and the continuous fluid interconnection of paved roads. This idea has culminated in Lot Ball, Fisk’s largest sculpture to date, which stands alone, floor-to-ceiling, in the biggest, most dramatic room of the gallery. Approaching a 1:1-scale distillation of the Queens Costco parking lot, with it’s graphic lines and arrows and formal curbing, the work makes a strong case for beauty in the most banal site imaginable.

Here are some other piece from this fun show!

T and S Self Storage Warehouse First Month Free Ball

T & S Self Storage Warehouse First Month Free Ball

T and S Self Storage Warehouse First Month Free Ball

Trash Can Ball
Trash Can Ball

Street Ball (Cobble)
Street Ball (Cobble)

I think the Manhole Cover is a nice touch!

Subway Balls
Subway Balls: Union Square and Spring Street

My favorites are these subway tile mosaic balls with abbreviated names of stations. Very Cool!

Stop Ball (23rd Street)
Subway Ball: 23rd Street

Mr. Softee By Lars Fisk will be on Exhibit Through October 15th, 2016 at Marlborough Gallery, Located at 545 West 25th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Jean Arp, Configuration in Serpentine Movements

Configuration in Serpentine Movements
Photo By Gail

In his later years, Jean Arp produced three-dimensional sculptures that he modeled in plaster and translated into stone and bronze. Plaster enabled Arp to experiments with new, unique forms, such as the amoeba-like shapes in Configuration in Serpentine Movements (1950). Referring to his biomorphic art as “l’art concret” (concrete art), Arp emphasized how this style evoked natural forms without imitation or specific definition, as if the sculpture had been created by natural forces rather than his own hand.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Beauties Sculpture Installation By John Monti in The Grace Building Lobby

Sculptures By John Monti
All Photos By Gail

I love a happy accident, which is what I have to call my discovery of this fun new exhibit by artist John Monti, which I spotted in the 42nd Street Lobby of The Grace Building as I walked past on the way to the F Train.

Sculptures By John Monti

Sculptures By John Monti Signage

The installation, which is made up of seven amorphous-shaped bright Red and Lime Green sculptures,  is called Beauties and it actually opens with a reception on Thursday, September 15th from 6 – 8 PM, which means there will probably be free wine!

Sculptures By John Monti

Sculptures By John Monti

Red Surface

Up close, you can see that the sculptures’ surfaces are covered with fine, sparkly glitter!

Green Surface

Sculptures By John Monti

I enjoyed looking at them.

Sculptures By John Monti

I know that if Geoffrey sees this photo he will say that they look like Sex Toys. Because they do.

Beauties will be on Exhibit through November 11th, 2016, at The Grace Building Lobby, Located at 1114 Avenue of the Americas (AKA Sixth Avenue), But the Main Entrance is on 42nd Street, between 5th and 6th Avenues, just across the street from Bryant Park and New York Public Library. This exhibit is sponsored by Arts Brookfield.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Isamu Noguchi’s Red Cube Sculpture

Red Cube
All Photos By Gail

The Financial District in Lower Manhattan is a playground for monumental public art installations, including Isamu Noguchi’s Red Cube, which was installed on the plaza at 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets in 1968.

Red Cube 2

The diagonal lines of red painted steel stand in contrast to the stark horizontal and vertical lines of the adjacent front of the HSBC Building (formerly the Marine Midland Bank) by architect Gordon Bunshaft. Despite its title, the sculpture is not actually a cube, but instead seems as though it has been stretched along its vertical axis.

Red Cube 3

Aside from it’s striking color, Red Cube also stands out from the surrounding architecture in that all of its lines are diagonals, whereas the buildings are made up of horizontal and vertical lines. Additionally, the sculpture is balanced somewhat precariously on one corner, while the buildings, by contrast, and solidly placed.
Red Cube 4

Through the center of the cube there is a cylindrical hole, revealing an inner surface of gray with evenly-spaced lines moving from one opening of the hole to the other. Looking through this hole, the viewer’s gaze is directed skyward, towards the building behind, tying the sculpture and the architecture together.

Red Cube Hole

Red Cube is Located at 140 Broadway (at Liberty Street) New York, N.Y.10005. By Subway, Take the 4 or 5  to Wall Street Station.

Tanglewood By Shayne Dark at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden

Tanglewood Distance
All Photos By Gail

If you haven’t been to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden yet this summer, you really must go while the Lily Pool Terrace is still in bloom, which is through September. Also new to the Garden (since July) are three large-scale installations by Canadian artist Shayne Dark, who brings his work to Brooklyn Botanic as part of a yearlong sculpture exhibit.  The first one you’ll see, when you enter at 150 Eastern Parkway, is a group of bright blue-painted poles, which is called Tanglewood. The sculpture sits in the center of the Osborne Garden lawn, which allows viewers to approach it from a distance.

Tanglewood 1

In the excerpt below, from a conversation with Dark, the artist talks to Garden staff about the inspiration behind this work, how he chose his materials, and how he goes about installing such large, complex pieces in a public space.

Tanglewood (2014)

This work was inspired by Dark’s childhood growing up along the Ottawa River, in Ontario. “In the spring, logs coming down the river would get tangled up in the bend, and the men would come running out to break up these log jams. As a child, I was fascinated by this.”

The sculpture is constructed of cedar poles normally used as fence posts, painted a vivid blue. “For me, color is one of the easiest things to respond to and enjoy.” Dark used a matte theater paint that he discovered years ago while working with his brother on set designs in the Ed Sullivan Theater. “It’s also the same color used to create a blue screen effect. When you use it, there’s an optical illusion, a blurring effect, which is kind of surreal.”

Tanglewood 2

“Other pieces you might place so as to hide and reveal, but for this particular piece, it’s crucial that there be space around it so that your perspective changes as you come closer…so that it becomes monumental,” says Dark.  Each installation of Tanglewood is unique, and Dark added individual posts to the sculpture once it was placed on-site.

Installation in Progress

Tanglewood Detail
Tanglewood Detail

Tanglewood with Planter

Tanglewood will be on exhibit at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden through July, 2017.

Modern Art Monday: Dan Flavin, Untitled (to the “Innovator” of Wheeling Peachblow)

Untitled to the Innovator of Wheeling Peachblow
All Photos By Gail

Dan Flavin (1933 – 1996) began to use commercially available fluorescent light tubes in 1963. This work marries color and light, bringing them into three dimensions. In dialogue withe surrounding space, the vertical and horizontal tubes both illuminate and obscure the corner — a location not typically used for displaying art. Though the emitted light transcends its physical encasement and transforms the surrounding space, Flavin avoided characterizing his work as sublime and instead considered his light installation as “situations” or proposals. “One might not think of light as a matter of fact, but I do,” he stated. “And it is…as plain and open and direct an art as you will ever find.”

Untitled to the Innovator of Wheeling Peachblow

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Spectrum Specter By Soo Sunny Park

Spectrum Specter
Photo By Gail

American artist Soo Sunny Park continues her exploration of light and its impact on physical space and architectural design with Spectrum Specter — a small scale installation from her Unwoven Light series. Spectrum Specter is a curvaceous structure, suspended in the air and shaped from sections of chain link fencing. Within each open spaces hangs a shape made of iridescent acrylic Plexiglas. Each shape reflects and refracts the natural and artificial lighting, making sure the room and art never appear the same way twice.

Photographed in the Waterfall Mansion on NYC’s Upper East Side.

Soo Sunny Park Installation View