Tag Archive | Sculpture

Modern Art Monday Presents: Gun Magnet By Randall Harrington

Randall Harrington Gun Magnet Wool Tapestry
Photo By Gail

Randall Harrington’s Gun Magnet is but one example of the sculptor and painter’s statement work. Known for his high-concept fabrications of recomposed weaponry, Toastasaurus herds and eerily human robots, the Los Angeles-based artist found his niche in metal and mixed media after years of assisting big-name installation and performance artists working in film-set design. The Gun Magnet wool tapestry (2019, above) was inspired by the bronze sculpture (2014), seen below.

Gun Magnet Sculpture

Photographed as Part of Beyond The Streets in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

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Radio Station Call Letters Sculpture, Chicago

95.1 WBEZ FM
Photos By Gail

At first (or even second) glance, this colorful, towering sculpture comprised of jumbled letters and numbers may appear very random and indecipherable. Take a look at it from the correct angle, however, and it clearly spells out the frequency and call letters of radio station 95.1 WBEZ FM, in Chicago, which is an NPR station. Created by artist John Adduci, who is Chicago native, the sculpture has been around since 1996 and it changes location in and around Navy Pier at random intervals.

WBEZ BY John Adduci

Five Conversations By Lubaina Himid On The High Line

Five Conversations
All Photos By Gail

The High Line always seems to have new public art installed along its mile-plus length of green space, and Five Conversations by Tanzanian-born artist Lubaina Himid, although it has been up since April, was new to me as I walked south along the path on my way to the Whitney Museum one sweltering Sunday afternoon.

Five Conversations

For Five Conversations, Himid introduces five wooden doors reclaimed from traditional Georgian townhouses, painted with life-size portraits, cut into silhouettes, that stand freely as flat sculptures. The portraits depict everyday, stylish women who love talking to each other!

Five Conversations Detail

These works have a theatrical quality, referencing stage sets and the simplified histories that dominate our world. In her signature way, Himid brings the two-dimensional medium of painting into our three-dimensional world.

Five Conversations Detail

Part of the En Plein Air, a Group Exhibit that Examines and Expands the Tradition of Outdoor Painting, On View Through March 2020.

 

Simone Leigh’s Brick House On The High Line

Brick House By Simone Leigh
All Photos By Gail

The first time I laid eyes on Simone Leigh’s monumental Brick House sculpture I was on the bus heading uptown on 10th Avenue.

Simone Leigh Brick House from Distance

I looked up and there she was, gazing out over the oncoming traffic from her perch on the 30th Street overpass, which I am told is now known as The Plinth. A month or so passed before I was able to pay her a proper visit and find out what she is all about.

Brick House Taken From Street Level

Brick House By Simone Leigh

Brick House is a 16-foot-tall bronze bust of a Black woman with a torso that combines the forms of a skirt and a clay house. The sculpture’s head is crowned with an afro framed by cornrow braids, each ending in a cowrie shell. Brick House is the inaugural commission for the High Line Plinth, a new landmark destination for major public artworks in New York City.

Brick House By Simone Leigh
View of Brick House Looking East to 30th Street

This is the first monumental sculpture in Leigh’s Anatomy of Architecture series, an ongoing body of work in which the artist combines architectural forms, from regions as varied as West Africa and the Southern United States, with the human body. The sculpture’s title (which is familiar to most as the title to popular 1977-era song by The Commodores) comes from the term for a strong Black woman who stands with the strength, endurance, and integrity of a house made of bricks.

View of 10th Ave Looking South
View From The Plinth Looking South Down 10th Ave

Brick House references numerous architectural styles: Batammaliba architecture from Benin and Togo, the teleuk dwellings of the Mousgoum people of Cameroon and Chad, and the restaurant Mammy’s Cupboard in Natchez, Mississippi. The sculpture contrasts sharply against the landscape it inhabits, where glass-and-steel towers shoot up from among older industrial-era brick buildings, and where architectural and human scales are in constant negotiation. Resolutely facing down 10th Avenue, Leigh’s powerful Black female figure challenges us to consider the architecture around us, and how it reflects customs, values, priorities, and society as a whole.

Brick House By Simone Leigh

Leigh works across sculpture, video, installation, and social practice, stitching together references from different historical periods and distant geographical locations. As a sculptor, Leigh works predominantly in ceramics—a medium that she mastered early in her career—continually pushing the boundaries of her chosen material by working in new methods and larger scales. In her intersectional practice, Leigh focuses on how the body, society, and architecture inform and reveal one another. She examines the construction of Black female subjectivity, both through specific historical figures such as Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham, and more generally through overlapping historical lineages across Europe, Africa, the US, and the Caribbean.

The High Line Plinth presents a series of art installations that rotate every eighteen months. Designed as the focal point of the Spur, the newest section of the park that opened in spring 2019, the Plinth is the first space on the High Line dedicated solely to new commissions of contemporary art.

Simone Leigh’s Brick House will be on View on The High Line Plinth (at the Spur), 30th St. and 10th Ave., NYC, Through September 2020.

Simoe Leigh Brick House from Distance

Modern Art Monday Presents: Boy By Charles Ray

Boy By Charles Ray
All Photos By Gail

Having been employed as a department store janitor during his freshman year of college, Charles Ray (b. 1953) understands the unease that a mannequin — an inanimate object that one might readily mistake for a live human — can inspire.  Ray’s work is also charged with purely sculptural tensions that exist between surface and interior, armature and appendage and / or size and scale. With Boy (1992), Ray created a particularly disquieting figure.

Boy With Guard
Museum Guard With Sense of Humor Poses With Boy

The sculpture stands just shy of six feet tall, the artist’s exact height, yet maintains the softness of youth in its rounded cheeks and limbs. The boy is clad in outdated garments, hovering ‘between baby and Hitler youth,” in the words of one critic. Additionally, the boy’s pose and gesture suggest a confrontational manner at odds with his neutral expression.Boy By Charles Ray

Photographed at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Frieze 2019: A Photo Recap of The Fair’s Best Art!

Yayoi Kusama Narcissus Garden
Yayoi Kusama’s Narcissus Garden Sculpture/Installation Paired With Chris Ofili’s Painting To Take and To Give (All Photo By Gail)

On a very rainy Sunday in NYC, the ideal indoor activity turned out  be a ferry ride over to Randall’s Island for the Frieze Art Fair! Because what’s a little mud on your shoes compared to the joy of browsing for hours through thousands of prohibitively expensive artworks?

Yayoi Kusama Narcissus Garden
It Isn’t an Art Fair Without Yayoi Kusama!

Looking back through the digital archives, it appears that my previously most recent Frieze recap dates all the way back to 2015 — wow — for reasons that take too long to talk about. One thing that is abundantly clear though is that my skills as a photographer have improved greatly in the last four years! Let’s take look around this year’s Frieze Art Fair and check out a selection of my favorite art!

Carlotta

Carlotta (2017) is monumental 3D-effect stiles steel sculpture by Juame Pensa, found at Richard Grey Gallery. That’s an Alex Katz abstract painting at the left.

Colored Mirrored Circles

It didn’t take me long get distract by shiny things, because I neglected to note the artist of this installation of Colored Spherical Shaped Mirrors, which is just fantastic.

Metal Weed

It might look like a weed has sprouted up though a crack in the wall at the booth for the Marlborough Gallery, but that weed is actually a metal sculpture. Clever!

Quartz Eroded Newspaper Machine

Quartz Eroded Newspaper Machine (2019) by Daniel Arsham.

Quartz Eroded Newspaper Machine

Here’s the view of another side: Coffee Cup included! Spotted at Perrotin Gallery.

You Drive Me Crazy.

Two colorful, feathered bears wrestle playfully in this sculpture by Paola Pivi entitled You Drive Me Crazy, also at Perrotin Gallery.

Numbers

You know how it is when you have to wait so long for all of the people to clear out of the shot that your forget to make note of what you were photographing? This is one of those times.

Untitled After John Singleton Copley
Untitled (After John Singleton Copley) By Ewa Juszkiewicz

Mermaid Sculptures By Olivia Erlanger

Mermaid Sculptures by Olivia Erlanger at And Now Gallery sell for $8,000 each!

Back and Forth May Marilyn Lerner
Back and Forth (2016) By Marilyn Lerner at Kate Werble Gallery

Alyson Shotz at Derek Eller Gallery

Alyson Shotz created this iridescent suspended soft sculpture made from interlinked, dichroic-dyed aluminum discs, found at Derek Eller Gallery. Check out two detail views of this work, below.

Alyson Shotz at Derek Eller Gallery

Surface of Discs. Exterior.

Alyson Shotz at Derek Eller Gallery

Surface of Discs, Interior.

Gabriele Beveridge True Bone

Here’s a unique blown-glass work by Gabriele Beveridge called True Bone. It’s so lovely I am compelled to offer a side view from which you can see how the glass ‘weeps’ over the chromed Steele frame, or bone.

Gabriele Beveridge True Bone

Men Who Cannot Cry

Men Who Cannot Cry (2018) Neon Sculpture by Alfredo Jaar.

Mark Thomas Gibson The Snowman

Mark Thomas Gibson, The Snowman (2018) at Fredericks and Freiser.

Seung-Taek Lee
Stainless Steel and Urethane Vinyl Sculptures and Drawings by Seung-Taek Lee at Gallery Hyundai.

Alex Da Corte Orb Weaver Weft
Alex Da Corte, Orb Weaver Weft (2019) at Karma Gallery.

Indigo Illusions
Indigo Illusions (1991) By Betye Saar at Roberts Projects.

Empowered Women
Empowered Women (2019) By Andrea Bowers at Andrew Kreps Gallery

This neon sign switched up its timely message by having the “ed” in “Empowered” flicker off and on. Nice.

Metaphysical Leg Pull By Duggie Fields
Metaphysical Leg Pull (1976) By Duggie Fields, at The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd.

You Should Be Dancing (2018)
You Should Be Dancing (2018) By Jim Lambie

This reflective wall sculpture made from the lenses of sunglasses was also spotted at the both for at The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd.

Mirror Balloons By Jeppe Hein
Mirror Balloons By Jeppe Hein (2019) at 303 Gallery of New York.

Sculptures By Marta Chilindron

Colorful Acrylic Sculptures By Marta Chilindron (Above and Below).

Sculpture By Marta Chilindron

My Life As A Tree
My Life As A Tree By Edouard Duval-Carrie (2019) at Lyle OReitzel Gallery.

Shiatsu
Shiatsu (2019) By Max Hooper Schneider

Now here’s a modern sculpture that has everything! Max Hooper Schneider’s Shiatsu takes a custom acyclic vitrine  — that an observer might easily mistake for an ordinary household aquarium — and creates a surreal habitat filled with hand tools scattered among the lush terrarium plant life and accented with a vintage neon sign! Let’s take a closer look.

Shiatsu Detail

Spectacular! Hooper Schneider’s work is represented by Maureen Paley Gallery of London.

Gate By Tony Cragg

Avid readers of The ‘Gig might recognize this freeform abstract sculpture as the work of sculptor Tony Cragg from This Post, though the one above, entitled Gate (2017) is of a much, much smaller scale!

Sound Suit By Nick Cave

Look Up: It’s one of Nick Cave’s Sound Suits!

Raked Leaves (Apparition)

Raked Leaves (Apparition) (2019) by Patrick Jacobs is a tiny diorama that was embedded into the wall of the booth for Pierogi Gallery of New York.

February (2018) by Devan Shimoyama

Check out this fabulous silk flower and bead-embellished hoodie sculpture, February (2018) by Devan Shimoyama. I would wear it.

Well that about wraps up this year’s Frieze coverage. If you dig the photos in this post please share the love and share the link on your social media! Art!

Sergio Romagnolo’s Red Plastic Drumkit

Red Plastic Drum Kit Front View
All Photos By Gail

It’s been nearly ten years since my gig writing for Modern Drummer magazine came to an unceremonious end, but I still get nostalgic when I see a work of art that pays homage to the drums. Check out this crazy kit by Brazilian artist Sergio Romagnolo, which is made from hand-molded, headed plastic.

Red Plastic Drumkit Side View

Here’s the kit shot from an angle that let’s you see the finer sculpture details, as the plastic dripping down from the rack-mounted toms onto the bass drum.

Red Plastic Drumkit Rear View

The full sculpted kit is comprised of a kick, or bass, drum, two rack-mounted toms, one floor tom, one snare drum, what is either meant to be a ride or crash cymbal, and one hi-hat cymbal, both on stands. The only crucial thing he left out — besides the hi-hat and bass drum pedals —  is the drum stool. Perhaps that feature was omitted to keep would-be drummers from sitting down and trying to play it!

Sergio Romagnolo Red Plastic Drumkit Detail

If you look closely, you will notice that Sergio has added small Red Rose, which is visible between the two mounted toms! In fact that is no accident, as the official title of the piece is Drums With Flower (2019). This artist prefers to create sculptures that explore the urban and industrial universe, such as cars, buildings, airplanes, cameras, and trash cans.

Red Plastic Drumkit Installation View

In the above installation view, you can see works by two other Brazilian artists: a painting by Jose Leonilson on the wall, and a reflective sculpture by Vanderlei Lopes on the carpet, foreground.

Photographed at the Frieze Art Fair, 2019, in the Booth for Galeria Marilia Razuk of Sao Paolo, Brazil.

Red Drum Kit