Tag Archives: sculpture

Alternative Perspectives: The Math-Inspired Sculpture Of Anton Bakker

opus 951465 photo by gail worley
Opus 951465 (2021): Painted Steel, Knotted Polylinear Cubic Lattice Path (All Photos By Gail)

The National Museum of Mathematics (aka MoMath) might not be a venue where one would expect to also find an art gallery, but they have one: and in the case of sculptor Anton Bakker, the venue is ideally suited.

opus 951465 photo by gail worley
Opus 951465 Digital Rendering

Bakker is a contemporary artist specializing in sculpture and its digital possibilities. He has been influenced by his life experiences in the Netherlands, France and now the US, where his artist practice has been based for more than ten years. Mo Math’s Composite Gallery is currently hosting Alternative Perspectives, an exciting exhibit of Bakker’s work — including several monumental pieces — that is complemented by the inclusion of nine rare works by the artist’s biggest influence, the legendary MC Escher.

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David Hammons Day’s End at Pier 52

days end david hammons photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

One of the great things about public art is how the viewer can have such a wholly unique experience of the piece depending on the time of day it is viewed. In the case of  Day’s End, the new, permanent sculpture by David Hammons (b. 1943), I saw it up-close for the first time at, well, day’s end. Watching the sun set through the sculpture and dip behind the New Jersey skyline was a beautiful thing to behold, especially as many of us are only just now able to walk outside free of masks for the first time in over year.

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Alex Da Corte’s As Long As The Sun Lasts at the Met Roof Garden

alex da corte sculpture photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

I’ve been fortunate to visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art probably half a dozen times since it reopened last July, post-Covid lockdown, but the building’s roof garden only just reopened in April, for the debut of its latest site-specific commission.  As Long As The Sun Lasts, by Philadelphia-based artist Alex Da Corte, is a whimsical mash up of Sesame Street and the works of Alexander Calder that could light up the rooftop even on the cloudiest day.

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Pink Thing of The Day: Rose Quartz Nude Figure

pink quartz nude figure photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

This little Pink Lady carved from rose quartz has a home in the Natural History Museum of Utah in Salt Lake City. Watch for an in-depth post highlighting the museum’s amazing Dinosaur collection in the near future!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Sol LeWitt, Five Towers

sol lewitt five towers photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

One of the pioneers of Conceptual art, Sol LeWitt gave primacy to the originating idea of a work of art rather than to its execution. LeWitt had been developing these ideas in three-dimensional objects he called “structures.” Based on the unit of an open, rather than solid, cube, the works peel away what he perceived as the decorative skin on traditional sculpture, revealing their underlying skeleton, or structure.

sol lewitt five towers photo by gail worley

Though he created structures in a range of scales and shapes — the permutations growing more intricate over the decades — LeWitt maintained the use of white cubes with a ratio of 1:8.5; that is, the open space between the edges of a cube is 8.5 times the width of each edge. Five Towers (1986), a later, more complex structure, rises more than seven feet high, culminating in four towers on each corner of a square, with a fifth tower in the center.

sol lewitt five towers photo by gail worley

Photographed in The Whitney Museum in NYC.

Pink Thing Of The Day: Pink Lazy Throne Sculpture

pink lazy throne photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

We honestly felt like we had stumbled upon a real life version Pee-Wee’s Playhouse when we entered design store / art gallery Leroy’s Place, and immediately encountered this monumentally enchanting (and Pink) Lazy Throne by artist Jacques Duffourc. A New Orleans native whose specialties include set design and puppeteering,  Duffourc works primarily in recycled and found materials, and has a signature skill of transforming everyday materials into extraordinary works of art.

pink lazy throne finish detail photo by gail worley
Finish Detail

The chair has a wood structure, and is then sculpted using a unique method of building with contact cement and cardboard.

Post Continues After The Jump!

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Eye On Design: César Expansion Table

cesar expansion table photo by gail worley
Installation View With Rene Gabriel’s Bridge Armchair (All Photos By Gail)

The celebrated French artist César (born Cesare Baldaccini) was a founding member in 1960 of the Nouveaux Réalistes group. His amorphous bronze and glass Expansion Table (1977) is one of the rare works in which César applied his Expansion technique to a functional object. Whereas he also created a handful of bronze ashtrays, lamps, as well as the console commissioned by Henri Samuel, the Expansion Table is the object in which César philosophy — his belief that life and art are one entity, indivisible —achieves its apex.

cesar expansion table detail photo by gail worley

Some background on César’s Expansions: One of the artist’s great breakthroughs in the late 1960s took the form of sculptural spills called Expansions. Realized with liquid polyurethane foam, a novel material at the time, each spill involved actively pouring specifically tinted foam, allowing it to expand, and then leaving it to set in a process that resulted in soft forms several times larger than their original liquid volume.

cesar expansion table detail photo by gail worley

César was moved by this material’s freedom and energy — rather than conforming to the matrix of a mold, it actually spread and expanded in what would famously become a critically admired analog for the new spirit of liberation that marked the era. As Pierre Restany noted in 1970, “César’s expansions reveal a new phase in his work, the phase of maturity: the mastering of the technique allied to the freedom of form.”

cesar expansion table installation view photo by gail worley

Photographed at at Demisch Danant, Located at 30 West 12th Street in NYC.