Tag Archive | Sculpture

Very Large Fish Lure on Water Street

Very Large Fish Lure
All Photos By Gail

I’ve posted many photos  and stories behind the fantastic public art that can be found in the Financial District, and here’s another piece I just discovered thanks to a tip on Instagram (thanks @fidi_living). Public spaces built by the Kaufman Organization are known for their quirky objects and splashes of color, and the plaza and arcade space at 200 Water Street, adjacent to Fulton Street to the northeast, is no exception.

Very Large Fish Lure
View Facing North

Completed in 1972, the Fulton Plaza, as it is officially known, maintains much of the original 1970s whimsy of the space, which  has recently undergone some renovations since the building it flanks was converted by a new owner from offices to residential dormitory use. Here you will find a Giant Fishing Lure (which, research reveals, once hung above  a pool of water). The Lure’s cascading hooks dangle ominously, ready to ensnare the next victim!

Very Large Fish Lure
View Facing West South Street Seaport

Entitled Very Large Fish Lure, the sculpture is credited to the Rebel Fishing Lure Co., with concept design by the late graphic designer Rudolph de Harak, a favorite of Kaufman’s, whose work was used at other company buildings.

 Merman’s Mermaid by Forrest Wilson
Merman’s Mermaid (1971) by Forrest Wilson

You can see that the plaza’s water theme continues in this fun mural, seen in the second photo of this post, which adorns a wall just north of the sculpture.

Very Large Fish Lure

Look out for those hooks!

Very Large Fish Lure

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Art on The High Line: Jon Rafman, The Swallower Swallowed

Swallowed
All Photos By Gail

The videos and sculptures Jon Rafman (b. 1981)s are comprised of images constantly swallowing one another, much in the way that we consume media ourselves every day. In his commission for the High Line, Rafman presents a sculpture that takes the form of a circle of autophagous animals including a Dog, a Whale, a Lizard, possibly a Pig, and a Human all looped into a speculative food chain.

Jon Rafman’s The Swallower Swallowed is part of the Group Show Mutations, and it will be on view at the High Line Park, West of 10th Avenue right at 23rd Street, Through March of 2018.

Swallowed

Roxy Paine’s Farewell Transmission at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Meeting
Meeting, 2016, Scale Diorama By Roxy Paine (All Photos By Gail)

Paul Kasmin Gallery is currently hosting Farewell Transmission, a two-venue exhibition of recent sculpture by Roxy Paine, for the artist’s first major New York solo exhibition in three years and the first of his sculpture with Paul Kasmin.

Over the past 25 years, Paine’s sculptures ruminate upon the clash of the human and the natural worlds, and the warring of chaos and control that result from humanity’s attempts to manage the process.  Farewell Transmission presents two distinct series, Dioramas and Dendroids; each express the artist’s anxieties about the human impact on our habitat and the mechanized tools that seek to impose order and control, often to disordered and unpredictable ends.

In his Dioramas, Paine adopts and adapts a format familiar within the natural history museum, but instead of employing human artifice to represent the natural world, Paine’s Dioramas use organic materials to represent quotidian environments where the fundamental states of the Homo Sapien can be observed. Rooted in the Greek language, diorama translates to “through that which is seen.” Paine’s Dioramas are a device through which one can examine our own habitat, culture and society.  Seemingly innocuous at first, each Diorama presents a room devoid of actual figures, yet charged with their psychological dilemmas.

Meeting Detail

Meeting (2016) is the artist’s most intimate in scale from the series, and implies through attentive details such as a ring of non-descript office chairs, the community space that hosts one of the variety twelve-step substance abuse programs.

Meeting Coffee

Experiment
Experiment, Installation View

Experiment (2015) the only diorama of an actual historical event, though one for which we have no photographs, depicts the setting of a 1950s-70s CIA surveillance program examining the effects of LSD.

Experiment Detail

Looking at this hallucinatory experience through another surveilling environment heightens the paranoid feelings of control, manipulation and misguided forensic observation. Personal associations and past encounters with these familiar spaces inevitably creep into the imagined scenes of the Diorama, collapsing the distance between the viewer and that which is on view.

Experiment Detail

Desolation Row

In Desolation Row (2017) a remarkable new work, Paine synthesizes the tree silhouettes of the Dendroids, the simulation of the Dioramas and the expansiveness of his earlier Fields series to replicate nature in solitude and at its most poignant moment.

Desolation Row

Returning to the motif of the tree, Paine presents them in Desolation Row as charred, barren, and destroyed. Positioned across a 13-ft table, Desolation Row is an unflinching portrayal of the infinite cycle of control and chaos reaching its devastating yet paradoxical conclusion where Paine leaves the question of renewal to be resolved.

Dendroids Installation View

Fusing organic forms, such as trees, flowers, and fungi with man-made structures and materials among which include stainless steel, epoxy, and polymer, Paine invents, distorts, surprises and confounds our perception of the natural and inorganic and the real and artificial.

Dendroids

The new Dendroids, Paine’s first iteration in over 5 years of his iconic stainless steel sculptures, further expand upon this multifaceted, yet imperfect, transformation of the industrial into the natural, with even more daring grafting, beguiling engineering, and wild experimentation.

Organ Tree

In the new works, tree trunks, branches and roots intertwine with lungs and hearts, or with electricity poles and debris and detritus.

Utility Pole Treet

Ground Fault (2016) poetically melds a tree’s roots and trunk with two transformers that are used to circulate electromagnetic energy.  Paine’s Dendroids continue to reveal the intrinsic affinities and twisted connectivity of a tree’s form with other plant, human and man-made systems.

Dendrils Triptych

Roxy Paine: Farewell Transmission, will be on Exhibit Through July 1st, 2011 at Paul Kasmin Gallery’s Locations at293 and 297 Tenth Avenue, at 27th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Roxy Paine Signage

Dendrils

 

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Tangled Up In Blue By Kathleen Bennett Bastis

Tangled Up In Blue
Photo By Gail

We walked into an exhibit by Kathleen Bennett Bastis in the middle of last week’s art crawl, and what stood out for me most was this piece, Tangled Up In Blue which instantly reminded me of the work of John Chamberlain, although on a much smaller scale.

The sculpture, made of found and repurposed metal, plastic and paper is part of Tossed and Found, Bastis’ second solo at Chelsea’s First Street Gallery, in which she continues to explore and celebrate the inherent beauty of found objects that are cast off, washed up, worn out and walked over.

The artist explains: “I curate the streets, riverbanks and scrapyards collecting detached bits and fragments; allowing them to start the conversation that guides the direction of a piece. I try to forge a relationship between these elements’ unique visual ‘dialects’ and construct a common language by translating their past narrative into present tense.”

You can see the rest of Tossed and Found on Exhibit Through May 20th, 2017 at First Street Gallery, Located at 526 West 26th Street, Suite 209, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Shawn Thornton’s Pareidolia at Cue Art Foundation

Shawn Thornton Painting
All Photos By Gail

The first time I was exposed to the minutely-detailed and unconventionally psychedelic paintings of Philadelphia-based artist Shawn Thornton, I thought I was looking at paintings of vibrantly colorful circuit boards. It’s an easy misconception to make, I suspect. Thornton’s canvases are dense with the intersecting lines of diagram-like designs and irregular grids, which often contain images of birds, animals, people, or even the artist himself. While he’s shown extensively at the Fleisher/Ollman Gallery and Stephen Romano Gallery here in NYC — and Thornton’s work was also featured in an episode of HBO’s High Maintenance (which, as an aside, is a fantastically entertaining show) — but his unique artworks have a chance to gain greater exposure in the solo exhibit, Pareidolia, which includes works produced in a variety of media between 1995 and 2017, up now at Cue Art Foundation.

Shawn Thornton Painting

Since I have previously seen and written about an exhibit by artist Tahiti Pehrson which was also called Pareidolia, I know that the exhibit’s title refers to a psychological phenomenon involving a stimulus (an image or a sound) wherein the mind perceives a familiar pattern where none actually exists. This is a very appropriate title for Thornton’s body of work, and especially this expanded collection, which showcases not only paintings but also includes found-object sculptures and video installations.

Toy and Found Object Sculpture

There are two large assemblage sculptures in Pareidolia which remind me very much of the work of artist Matthew Dutton, whose art is always so enigmatic and captivating; like something you’d see in a fever dream. I love that Thornton can transform a combination of vintage toys, furniture and ordinary household items, like a carousel clothespin hanger, into a fantasy device that appears to have some kind of practical function or purpose.

Toy Sculpture Detail
Detail from Above Sculpture

Elephant and Giraffe Installation View

This altar-like tableau, starring a whimsical plastic Elephant and Giraffe stuffed with tiny lights, also features antlers, tree branches, bells, padlocks, vinyl LP discs, and tiny living plants.

Elephant Close Up

Really great.

Mandolin and Painting

Serpents Egg in the Seat Of Consciousness
Serpents Egg in the Seat Of Consciousness

Many of the paintings, such as this one, feature self-portraits of Thornton hidden in the midst of other images. It turns out that Thornton’s own experiences with Pareidolia, which is evident in his hallucinatory artworks, was triggered by an undiagnosed brain tumor in his pineal gland, which he lived with for over a decade.

Installation View

The above collection of small-scale paintings directly reference the artist’s experience with surgery to remove the tumor.

Green Flame Hypnosis
Green Flame Hypnosis

It is not a coincidence that these paintings resemble maps of Thornton’s psyche.

A Fracture in the Golden Mean
A Fracture in the Golden Mean

Paintings like these can take Thornton over a year to complete, and there are no accidental brush strokes.

Lobotomy of the Ghost Mechanics - Scarab Timetable
Lobotomy of the Ghost Mechanics – Scarab Timetable

Brahmastra for a New Age (UFO / Time Machine)
Brahmastra for a New Age (UFO / Time Machine)

Thornton worked on the above canvas from 2010 to 2103.

Detail from Brahmastra for a New Age (UFO / Time Machine)

Take a look at the detail from just a couple of square inches of this painting! Unbelievable!

Shawm Thorntown Signage

Come and discover the world of Shawn Thornton now at Cue Art Foundation before the show closes!

Shaun Thornton’s Pareidolia will be on Exhibit Through May 24th, 2017 at Cue Art Foundation, Located at 137 West 25th Street (between 6th and 7th Avenues) in NYC.

Black Pyramid Meditation
Black Pyramid Meditation

Favorite Pink Artworks From the Affordable Art Fair, Spring 2017!

AAFNY Spring 2017
All Photos By Gail

You say you want Pink Things? I got yer Pink Things right here. The Spring edition of the Affordable Art Fair has come and gone from NYC, until it returns in the fall, and we had a ton of fun this year seeing many old friend and lots of exciting new artworks all priced to own! Affordable Art!

Collect Art Yourself

With so very many galleries exhibiting at the fair from all over the globe, we like to distil it down by choosing our favorite Pink Artworks and bringing them to your face, which will give you a good idea of the scope of painting, photography, sculpture and multi-media that finds its way into the two levels of the Metropolitan Pavilion when the AAF rolls into town. Though the fair is over for now, you can still purchase many of these pieces, or others by the same artist, from the galleries via their brick and mortar locations, or websites. No worries; I am going to tell you everything you need to know.

Pink Level

Let’s head on up to the Pink Level, shall we?

Crown By Camomile Hixon at Soraya Cartategui Art Gallery

The Soraya Cartategui Art Gallery (Spain) showcased many canvas works made with glitter, like this Crown by Camomile Hixon, who also did the Neon Pink Hot Lips, seen below.

Neon Pink Hot Lips

They look quite like the Rocky Horror Picture Show lips, don’t cha think? Probably an influence.

Glitter Sandwich
Glitter Sandwich By Kimberly Genevieve at Artstar Dot Com

Mmm. . . delicious glitter.

Blue and Pink By Isabel Soto
Blue and Pink Hands By Isabel Soto

I am including the Blue Hand here, along with the Pink, because I appreciate its message!

Drip By Mara Minuzzo
Drip By Mara Minuzzo at Lustre Contemporary Dot Com of Canada

Because it’s almost Ice Cream Weather!

Strawberry Shortcake Pop By Daniel Jacob

Or how about cooling off with this Swarovski Crystal-encrusted cast of a Strawberry Shortcake Pop By Daniel Jacob at Axiom Contemporary, Santa Monica.

Serigraph Screen Printed Perspex Layers

OK, here is some amazing stuff: Serigraph Screen Printed Perspex Layers by Kate Banazi, who is represented by Gas Gallery (London). The  visible layers of vibrant color combinations really made us go a little crazy with desire for this art.

Serigraph Screen Printed Perspex Layers

Soooo beautiful!

18 Perspectives By Jose Margulis

The Neon Pink wall sculpture above, made of PVC and aluminum, is called 18 Perspectives by Jose Margulis, and it is available from  Ai Bo Gallery located in Purchase, New York.

Untitled Pink Pizza By Stefan Gross
Untitled (Pink Pizza) By Stefan Gross, at Chiefs and Spirits, Located in the The Hague, Netherlands

This is what happens to a pepperoni pizza when your college roommate abandons it on the rug for three weeks.

No 13 Fleur Dans La Vie

This old-school looking oil painting is just a detail from a piece called No 13 Fleur Dans La Vie which I saw in the booth for Genuine Global Company of Seoul, Korea. Sadly, I seem to have missed the artists name.

Rose is Back By Dganit Blechner

An iconic portrait of Audrey Hepburn from her role in Breakfast at Tiffany’s is appropriated and updated as Rose is Back by Israeli artist Dganit Blechner, found at Linda Blackstone Gallery, which is based in London.

Cornucopia By Jack Frame
Cornucopia By Jack Frame Cube Gallery, London

Do you like Trees? The Affordable Art Fair has Trees for you.

\Pink Sloe
Pink Sloe By Henrik Simonsen at Eyestorm Gallery, London

Hot Oak II By Emma Levine
Hot Oak II By Emma Levine at LCA (London Contemporary Art)

Martina By Olivier Duhamel

Do you like Nudes? Who doesn’t, right? Check out this unique piece: Martina by Olivier Duhamel, which we found at the booth for La Lanta Gallery in Bangkok. Despite appearances, this fine lady is not an example of 3D Printing, but rather it is hand-assembled Acrylic Slices. Here’s another view:

Martina By Olivier Duhamel

To say that Martina created a substantial buzz in the booth is an understatement!

151 Proof By Pasha Setrova

 151 Proof By Pasha Setrova at Arteria Gallery, Bromont, Canada.

Pink Torso By SangSik Hong

Pink Torso by SangSik Hong at Krause Gallery, NYC is made up of pale pink drinking straws cut to different length and hand assembled.

First Lady By Michael Wallner

First Lady By Michael Wallner at Will’s Art Warehouse, London.

Morning Smile Fuschia by Marie Noelle Royanette

Morning Smile Fushia by Marie Noelle Royanette at Paris-based Galerie Virginie Barrou Planquart.

The Illest Biggie Bust By Ryan Callanan

We’d like to give a special shout out to the friendly folks at Tag Fine Arts in London, who represent pop art sculptor Ryan Callanan, an artist whose work you will have seen on The ‘Gig previous to this post. Callanan’s  sculpture, The Illest  / Biggie Bust was available in an array of solid colors to suit your décor and taste.

The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour

This wall of Pink-hued light boxes were ‘lighting up’ the booth of Arteria Gallery, of Bromont, Canada. Specifically, we are interested in the very long boxon the far left. Let’s take a closer look.

Beatles Film Strips

As you can see, the box is made up of film negative strips from The Beatles’  Magical Mystery Tour, specifically from the clip for I Am The WalrusHugo Cantin is the artist.

Dream In Color Pool Installation By Richard Heeps

This is a photograph from the Dream In Color Pool Installation (2002) by Richard Heeps and we saw it at Bleach Box Photography GalleryLondon.

And that’s wrap! Thanks Affordable Art Fair — see you again in the fall!

Pink Thing Of The Day: Made in China (Pink) By Sui Jianguo

Made in China Pink
Photos By Gail

Available in a signed, limited edition of 120 pieces, Made in China (Pink) by Chinese artist Sui Jiango was photographed in the Taglialatella Galleries on Tenth Avenue between 23rd and 24th Streets in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Made in China Pink