Tag Archive | Sculpture

Favorite Art From The Affordable Art Fair, Fall 2018!

Drums for Peace By Ringo Star $1390
Drums For Peace Knotted Gun By Ringo Starr ($1390) For The Non-Violence Art Project

Life is better with Art in it: it’s just a fact. Whether you are a seasoned collector, someone looking to start a collection by investing in a single piece for your home, or an art lover who just enjoys the inspiration and joy of browsing, the Affordable Art Fair is a great place to expose yourself to (and purchase) art of almost every tangible medium. Held in a dual-floor space inside the Metropolitan Pavilion, AAFNYC gathers contemporary galleries from across the globe in the spring and fall each year for a three-day event that’s always both educational and lots of fun. This season’s fair boasted the most diverse collection of high-quality, original art that l’ve noticed for as long as I’ve been attending. Let me turn you on to some of my favorite pieces spotted at this year’s fall fair!

Non Violence Project Booth

This year’s lead booth was sponsored by the Non-Violence Art Project. The Non-Violence Symbol, also known as the Knotted Gun, was originally created by Swedish artist Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd as a memorial tribute to John Lennon after he was shot and killed in New York City in December 1980. The Non-Violence Project Foundation is a non-profit organization promoting peace and social change through education.

One World Knotted Gun
One World Knotted Gun, $950

Imagine By Yoko Ono
Imagine Knotted Gun By Yoko Ono, $1390

A portion of the revenue from the sales of these Limited Edition sculptures goes to the Non-Violence Project and contributes to social change and bringing increased peace to the world. Art for Peace!

I Need This Wilderness For My Heart to Beat
I Need This Wilderness For My Heart to Beat By Adam Bridgland ($300,Limited Edition Print)  

At every fall edition, Affordable Art Fair NYC releases a Limited Edition Print in collaboration with an artist commissioned by the fair. Established in 2013 with minimalist artist Chad Kouri, Affordable Art Fair has since worked with artists specializing in a variety of mediums, from large scale woodcuts to mixed media collage pieces, with each artwork incorporating the fair’s signature color, pink. Limited to an edition size of 10, the prints are exhibited and available for sale at the fall fair.

This season, the Limited Edition Print series featured the above artwork by London-based artist Adam Bridgland (of Jealous Gallery). The screen print with spray paint overlays is a love letter to the urban wilderness that is New York City, and a thematic continuation of a sculptural work that Adam created earlier in 2018.

Van Gogh Vodka

Before I get any further, I must give a shout out to deliciously smooth Van Gogh Vodka, who sponsored this year’s open bar! In case you didn’t already know, the bar is hidden way in the back on the second floor of the fair. I always make sure to hit that acton as soon as possible!

Joan By Jean-Luc Almond

Let’s kick off this recap with some art featuring lovely ladies! This abstract portrait is entitled Joan and it is by Jean-Luc Almond ($7500), who is represented by Art Unified Gallery of Venice, California.

I Love Plastic By Brett Goldstar
I Love Plastic By Brett Goldstar ($4400) at Tag Fine Arts of London

This collage of Marilyn Monroe’s face is created from hundreds of smaller images culled from vintage magazines.

Sister With Hat By Mart de Brouwer
Sister With Hat By Mart de Brouwer ($6,000) at Chiefs and Spirits, The Hague, Netherlands

Angele By Keymi
Angele By Keymi ($4250) at Artered Gallery of Barcelona

I love this pop art portrait that looks like the pieces of a puzzle. Keymi (slang for Mickey) is the pseudonym of French painter and graffiti artist Stephan Raymond.

Three Jumpers By Moto Waganari

Sadly, I only managed to capture two of the Three Jumpers, a thread-based hanging sculpture by Moto Waganari ($9,300) at Connect Contemporary of Atlanta.

Swirl By Pezhman
Swirl By Pezhman ($8600) at Connect Contemporary of Atlanta

Check out the details on the skirt, below, which is made with paint and encaustic.

Swirl By Pezhman Skirt Detail
Swirl, Skirt Detail

September Harvest By Kristin Sjaarda

Everyone loves flowers. One of the first pieces that wowed me at the show was September Harvest by Kristin Sjaarda ($4250), which I found at Eye Buy Art, an online photography gallery located in Toronto. Kristin creates contemporary still-life photography influenced by the Dutch masters. She arranges and photographs flowers she picked from her own garden, emphasizing the diversity and beauty of the world around us. Kristin also only uses the natural light coming in from her kitchen window. Her work is simply stunning.

Flores By Fran Mora
Flores By Fran Mora ($7000) at Cube Gallery, London 

Ria Formosa By Joana Vasconcelos

This colorful abstract entitled Ria Formosa, by artist Joana Vasconcelos, looks like a bouquet of flowers on acid. Available for $6500 at Manifold Editions, London, the print was created using a combination of etching and block printing methods.

Dripping Dots All In Love Deep Red By Cindy Shaoul
Dripping Dots, All In Love, Deep Red By Cindy Shaoul ($1000) at Lilac Gallery, NYC 

City Window By Mathijs Siemens
City Window By Mathijs Siemens ($3500) at Chiefs and Spirits, The Hague, Netherlands

Mathijs Siemens is a Dutch artist who creates his unique artwork using thread. Check out the detail below!

City Window By Mathijs Siemens Detail
City Window (Detail)

Ruined By James Talon

Ruined By James Talon ($4250) at The Public House of Art, Amsterdam

Transparencies IV By Salvador Santos

Transparencies (Sereis) By Salvador Santos at Soraya Cartategui Art Gallery, Madrid

Details Oriented in Space 3 By Laurence Jones
Details Oriented in Space 3 By Laurence Jones ($4800) at Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery, London

I love these two paintings (above and below) of mid-century homes!

Casa Del Rey By Karen Lynn
Casa Del Rey By Karen Lynn ($3250) Fine Art Consultancy of Tokyo and London

Gladys By Jeff Chester
Gladys By Jeff Chester ($7500) at Decorazon Gallery, Dallas, New York City and London

Still Life By Colin Wilson
Still Life By Colin Wilson ($1950) at Ronen Art Gallery, Amsterdam

Murdered Art By Artem Ryskin
Murdered Art By Artem Ryskin ($4500) at Artspace Warehouse, Los Angeles

This relief wall sculpture of a tube of paint is made from screws! Check out the detail below!

Murdered Art By Artem Ryskin
Murdered Art (Detail)

Rocks 2 By Perish The Thought
Rocks 2 By Perish The Thought ($2500) at Tag Fine Arts, London

Man Bag By Debra Franses-Bean $10,000

AAFNYC is definitely the place to find unusual sculptures. These Man Bag sculptures by Debra Franses-Bean are $10,000 from Tag Fine Arts. Each piece, made from cast resin and found objects, is unique.

Man Bag By Debra Franses-Bean $10,000

Mixed Media Sculpture By Patrick Bergsma
Mixed Media Sculpture By Patrick Bergsma ($4500) at Chiefs and Spirits

She Screamed for Ice Cream By Gillie and Marc

She Screamed for Ice Cream By Gillie and Marc ($2800) at Lilac Gallery 

Blown Away Trooper By Josh Mayhem
Blown Away Trooper By Josh Mayhem ($2400)

Series of Framed Cassettes By James Talon

Music and musicians offer a huge source of inspiration for visual artists. This series of framed cassette tapes by James Talon were spotted at the booth for Public House of Art. They sell for $2,000 each.

James Talon Sex Pistols Never Mind The Bollocks
Sex Pistols, Never Mind The Bollocks

James Talon Prince Purple Rain
Prince, Purple Rain

Ziggy By Blockhead
Ziggy By Blockhead ($2200) at Connect Contemporary, Atlanta

David Bowie continues to inspire us.

Lets Surf By Cieu
Let’s Surf By Cieu ($5850) at Galerie Envie d’Art, Paris

Walking With the Beatles
Walking With The Beatles By Tanner Lawley ($8,00 Set of Four) Lawley Art Group of Dallas

This impressionist study of the four Beatles walking across Abbey Road is a fun way to revisit an iconic scene. The Beatles are still massively popular, but none them have inspired more artwork than John Lennon.

Cary Henrie Thought Circle

Imagine Thought Circle by Cary Henrie, made from acrylic on aluminum, is $295 from Lawley Art Group.

Lennon Superman By Srin Joy

This one is pretty great: Lennon Superman By Srin Joy ($3800) at Connect Contemporary.

That’s it for the Fall edition of Affordable Art Fair NYC. If you’re interested in any of the art you see here, please visit the galleries online! Cheers!

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Pink Thing Of The Day: Shell Pink Knotted Gun For The Non-Violence Project

Shell Pink
Photo By Gail

The Non-Violence Project Foundation (NVP) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to inspire, motivate and engage young people on how to peacefully resolve conflicts. It holds violence prevention and nonviolence education programs for schools and sports clubs around the world. NVP’s signature logo is the Non-Violence, also known as the Knotted Gun. It was created by the Swedish artist, Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd (19342016) as a memorial tribute to John Lennon after he was shot and killed on December 8, 1980, in New York City. Ambassadors of the Non-Violence Project include Sir Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and Yoko Ono, among others. This Shell Pink Knotted Gun sculpture was spotted for sale in the Non-Violence Project’s booth at the Fall 2018 Affordable Art Fair in NYC.

Armors Outdoor Art Installation On The Cloisters Lawn!

Armors Duo
All Photos By Gail

A couple of weeks ago, Geoffrey and I made the upper Mnahattan pilgrimage to The Cloisters to see the second half of The Met’s Heavenly Bodies costume exhibit, and we were not disappointed. A bonus of the trip is that, as we rode the bus from the subway up to the top of the hill – because who wants to walk in this heat? – I noticed what looked like life-size Knights in Armor scattered about the lawn, and decided that we must check that shit out on our way back to the train. And check it out we did.

Armors Wide Shot

It turns out that the Armored Knights, and their alien-looking, silvery Nude companions, part of an installation, Armors, which was created by Icelandic sculptor Steinunn Thorarinsdottir. Back home, the artist is known for the androgynous figures she’s placed at iconic landmarks across the globe, including in Reykjavík outside Hallgrímskirkja church and, back in 2011 at NYC’s Hammarskjöld Plaza near Second Avenue.

Armors

Armors is made up of three pairs of figures, each featuring a Knight — whose armor replicates a piece of 16th century armor found in gallery 317 at The Met – who is facing or interacting with one of Thorarinsdottir’s nude figures. The Knights were 3D scanned and then manufactured out of aluminum. Thorarinsdottir modeled each nude figure as a direct response to each distinct suit of armor, and all six were then brought to the Cloisters Lawn.

Armors Nude Figure

Knight and Cosplay Child
Knight Photographed with Random Cosplaying Child

In a statement about the work, Thorarinsdottir offers that, “Ancient armors are in themselves sculptural forms. They were developed for war but they give a sharp insight into the psyche of man. I wanted to merge medieval armors and ageless, androgynous figures in a way that would speak to the human condition today and in the past.”

Knight Close Up

Armors Distance Shot

Armors was created in collaboration with NYC Parks’ Art in the Parks program, and can be found in Fort Tryon Park, on the great lawn just downhill from the Cloisters. Get your medieval selfies through September 13th, 2018.

Knight and Nude Duo

Modern Art Monday Presents: Deborah Kass, OY / YO

OY YO
Photos By Gail

Since the 1980s, Deborah Kass has riffed on modern artworks by famous white men to reflect her experience as a Jewish lesbian. Here, Kass remakes Robert Indiana’s LOVE (itself a coded homage to queer male desire) with the twinned words Oy (a Yiddish exclamation of alarm or bother) and Yo.

OY YO

The artist considers herself to be a “total, absolute, 100 percent provincial New Yorker.” This work uses the city’s culturally specific, yet universal lingo to communicate the collective pride and exasperation of living here. Originally conceived as a monumental sculpture, it was installed for limited time in Brooklyn Bridge Park. OY/YO (2017) became an instant New York icon and photo op for tourists and residents of al backgrounds, for whom the pluralist spirit of the double-sided interjection resonated deeply

Photographed in the Jewish Museum in Manhattan. Note that This Work is Currently On View In Front of The Brooklyn Museum (as of 10/1/18).

The Dig of No Body (Soil Sample) By Mariechen Danz, on The High Line

The Dig of No Body
All Photo By Gail

Mariechen Danz (b. 1980, Dublin, Ireland) is a Berlin-based artist who researches representations of the body, investigating the way it has been given meaning in various cultures, epochs, and fields of knowledge. In her installations, performances and music, often in collaboration with other artists and musicians, the human body emerges as a contradictory structure and a scene of conflict — an utterly contaminated zone, both politically and historically.

The Dig of No Body Detail
Torso Section, Detail

For the High Line, Danz presents a new iteration of The Dig of No Body, a sculpture that references anatomical learning models segregated into individual parts, like a life-sized soil sample in movable layers.

The Dig of No Body Detail
Arm Section, Detail

The work evokes our changing relationship to the earth, as well as the popular contemporary name “Anthropocene,” which suggests humans’ creation of a new geological era.

The Dig of No Body

The Dig of No Body is Part of the Group Exhibition Agora, On Display Along The High Line Through March of 2019.

Monumental Sculptures By Tony Cragg on The Park Avenue Malls

Runner By Tony Cragg
All Photos By Gail

It’s not always easy to keep up with all of the Public Art installed in and around Manhattan at any given time, but I stumbled on the piece above, a towering, abstract white and cream fiberglass structure entitled Runner (2017), by sculptor Tony Cragg, when I visited the Park Avenue Armory for Nick Cave’s The Let Go installion. Runner is right out front of the Armory at the corner of 67th Street. When I left the Armory, I snapped a few additional shots of Runner before heading back down town.

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street

Runner is one of five monumental, abstract sculptures by Cragg, which present an opportunity for a leisurely stroll over nearly 20 blocks on this almost suburban Manhattan thoroughfare. The commanding sculptures exemplify Cragg’s experimentation with a variety of materials include the aforementioned fiberglass, stainless steel and bronze.

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street

Runner with the Park Avenue Armory in the Background.

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street
Runner, Detail

On the 4th of July, I decided to get some exercise and walk from 52nd to 79th Streets to check out the other four Cragg sculptures. Please enjoy my photos!

Mean Average, 2013, Park Avenue at East 52nd Street

Mean Average, at 52nd Street, is a weighty composition made of bronze.

Mean Average, 2013, Park Avenue at East 52nd Street

I tried to shoot each of the sculptures from a variety of angles.

Mean Average, 2013, Park Avenue at East 52nd Street

You can get such a different impression of the work, depending on your perspective.

Elliptical Column, 2012, Park Avenue at East 57th Street

Elliptical Column at 57th Street is a nearly 20-foot tall spire made of shiny, almost liquid-like stainless steel.

Elliptical Column, 2012, Park Avenue at East 57th Street

Elliptical Column, 2012, Park Avenue at East 57th Street

Hammerhead, 2017, Park Avenue at East 72nd Street

The same white and cream fiberglass used for Runner is also used for Hammerhead at  72nd Street, and the brightness allows the sculpture to really pop against the surrounding landscape.

Hammerhead, 2017, Park Avenue at East 72nd Street

Hammerhead, 2017, Park Avenue at East 72nd Street

Tommy, 2013, Park Avenue at East 79th Street

At 79th Street, the artist uses bronze again for Tommy, which has a blue-green patina. The vertical forms seemingly defy gravity while giving the impression of upward motion and kinetic energy, though they are static.

Tommy, 2013, Park Avenue at East 79th Street

This exhibition is presented in association with the Fund for Park Avenue  and Marian Goodman Gallery.

Tony Cragg’s Monumental Sculptures will be on Exhibit along Manhattan’s Park Avenue Malls at the intersections of 52nd Street, 57th Street, 67th Street, 72nd Street, and 79th Streets Through October 31st, 2018.

Urs Fischer, Things at Gagosian Gallery Pop Up Space

Things Front View
All Photos By Gail

The Gagosian Gallery chose an empty storefront at the the southeast corner or Fifth Avenue and 43rd Street for a Pop Up exhibit by Swiss artist Urs Fisher. The ad hoc gallery space contained exactly one work of art, a life-size Aluminum Rhinoceros entitled Things, whose form is adorned with an array of familiar, functional objects, ranging from a toilet to a handbag. The objects are either imbedded in the hide of the great beast, or they seem to float on its surface, as if attracted by a magnetic force. I went to check out Things on the penultimate day of its exhibition, which happened to be after work on a Friday.

Things Back and Right Side

Here’s some background on Things, and its meaning, from the Gagosian website:

“Amid the bustle of midtown Manhattan, a rhinoceros can be glimpsed through tall, arched windows at street level. Various man-made objects — including a copy machine, a car door, a handbag, a vacuum cleaner, a shovel, and a table — seem to float right through the creature, as if released from Earth’s gravitational pull.

Things Photocopier Detail

Carved out of aluminum, this barrage of incongruous items forms a single, continuous unit, anchored by the rhinoceros, which stands its ground. Produced at life size from a 3D scan of a taxidermy animal, its furrowed visage looms from a height of more than ten feet.

Things Back End

Things considers the ways that objects and forces — from plastic bottles and Wi-Fi signals to memories, history, and emotion — gather around and pass through our bodies as we move through the world, creating countless versions of reality that are specific to each of us.

Things Rear Leg Detail

Things Front and Right Side

Things Toilet

Like the rhinoceros, we absorb all that comes into our vicinity, and in the process we ourselves undergo a constant, often undetectable metamorphosis. Existence itself is thus presented as an accumulation, a collective gathering of physical and metaphorical baggage.

Things Right Rear

In his use of traditional materials and current technologies, Urs Fischer’s art tests the boundaries of possibility and perception. He has used clay, steel, wax, bread, dirt, vegetables, and fruit, among other substances, often to extreme paradoxical visual effect, revealing a keen attunement to the infinite mutability of image and form. The vicissitudes of objecthood are further complicated when Fischer’s sculptures are installed outside of the typical white-walled gallery.

Things Back Detail

In a courtyard, a vacated bank, an open field, his extroverted works have acted as portals into the uncanny. Here, the portal opens right between Grand Central Terminal and Bryant Park. An extraordinary creature made up of ordinary parts, Things transports unsuspecting passersby, if just for a moment, into a world that is at once prehistoric, digital, and mysteriously uncharted.

Things Head Detail

Things was produced in a series of three identical pieces, and all three have been sold to private collectors.

Things Front and Left Side