Tag Archive | Sculpture

Mark Mothersbaugh’s Ruby Kustard Sculpture

Mothersbaugh Ruby Kustard
All Photos By Gail

Resembling a soft-serve ice cream swirl, the upper portion of this sculpture consists of the world’s largest crystal ruby, at 30,o9o carats. Mark Mothersbaugh had the gem carved to poke fun at both fine jewelry and fine art. A ludicrous send-up of both disciplines, the sculpture, Ruby Kustard (2009 – 14) evinces Mothersbaugh’s longtime interest in using humor as a means of cultural and institutional critique.

Mothersbaugh Ruby Kustard in Vitrine

Photographed in the Grey Gallery at NYU as Part of the Exhibit, Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia, Which Runs Through July 15th, 2017.

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Pink Thing of The Day: To Be Titled By Lynda Benglis

Linda Benglis Pink Untitled
Photos By Gail

The 2017 edition of the annual Frieze Art Fair on New York’s Randall’s Island Park was a huge disappointment compared to previous years, or even to the Context Art Fair at the pier just one day earlier. The weather was the suck and most of the art was complete garbage. That said, I did get to see a handful of artworks  that moved me. One of those is this large, egg shaped and wall-mounted cast polyurethane sculpture, To Be Titled (2017) by legendary artist Lynda Benglis.

Linda Benglis Pink To Be Titled

It makes a pretty cool Pink Thing of The Day!

Final Week to See Jeff Koons’ Seated Ballerina in Rockefeller Center

Jeff Koons Seated Ballerina
All Photos By Gail

Jeff Koons‘ 45-foot tall inflatable nylon sculpture, Seated Ballerina, went up in Rockefeller Center Plaza on May 12th, 2017 and was originally due to be up only through June 2nd. But the sculpture’s tenure was extended by three weeks due to popular demand, which means you still have until this Friday, June 23rd, to make your pilgrimage to Midtown!

Seated Ballerina Right with People

Sunday was so very hot and summery here in the City, and I decided to train it uptown, where I visited a street fair, ate ice cream, and walked all around the Seated Ballerina sculpture, taking shots of her from every angle.

Seated Ballerina Distance With Prometheus

The famous golden statue of Prometheus is just in front of her.

Seated Ballerina Distance

And here’s a shot without Prometheus.

Seated Ballerina Left Close Up

I like that she’s up high enough that you can crop tourists out of your pics, or leave them in for life-size-scale comparison.

Seated Ballerina Left With People

Seated Ballerina

This one was taken with my iPhone as opposed to my regular camera. The difference in quality is amazing.

Seated Ballerina Skirt

Here’s a detailed look at the back of her skirt.

Seated Ballerina Through the Trees

Here she is as seen through the trees from across 50th street!

Seated Ballerina Left

Jeff Koons Seated Ballerina can be found in Rockefeller Center Plaza, bordered by Fifth Avenue to the East, Sixth Avenue to the West, 49th Street to the South and 50th Street to the North.

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Very Large Fish Lure on Water Street

Very Large Fish Lure
All Photos By Gail

I’ve posted many photos  and stories behind the fantastic public art that can be found in the Financial District, and here’s another piece I just discovered thanks to a tip on Instagram (thanks @fidi_living). Public spaces built by the Kaufman Organization are known for their quirky objects and splashes of color, and the plaza and arcade space at 200 Water Street, adjacent to Fulton Street to the northeast, is no exception.

Very Large Fish Lure
View Facing North

Completed in 1972, the Fulton Plaza, as it is officially known, maintains much of the original 1970s whimsy of the space, which  has recently undergone some renovations since the building it flanks was converted by a new owner from offices to residential dormitory use. Here you will find a Giant Fishing Lure (which, research reveals, once hung above  a pool of water). The Lure’s cascading hooks dangle ominously, ready to ensnare the next victim!

Very Large Fish Lure
View Facing West South Street Seaport

Entitled Very Large Fish Lure, the sculpture is credited to the Rebel Fishing Lure Co., with concept design by the late graphic designer Rudolph de Harak, a favorite of Kaufman’s, whose work was used at other company buildings.

 Merman’s Mermaid by Forrest Wilson
Merman’s Mermaid (1971) by Forrest Wilson

You can see that the plaza’s water theme continues in this fun mural, seen in the second photo of this post, which adorns a wall just north of the sculpture.

Very Large Fish Lure

Look out for those hooks!

Very Large Fish Lure

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Art on The High Line: Jon Rafman, The Swallower Swallowed

Swallowed
All Photos By Gail

The videos and sculptures Jon Rafman (b. 1981)s are comprised of images constantly swallowing one another, much in the way that we consume media ourselves every day. In his commission for the High Line, Rafman presents a sculpture that takes the form of a circle of autophagous animals including a Dog, a Whale, a Lizard, possibly a Pig, and a Human all looped into a speculative food chain.

Jon Rafman’s The Swallower Swallowed is part of the Group Show Mutations, and it will be on view at the High Line Park, West of 10th Avenue right at 23rd Street, Through March of 2018.

Swallowed

Roxy Paine’s Farewell Transmission at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Meeting
Meeting, 2016, Scale Diorama By Roxy Paine (All Photos By Gail)

Paul Kasmin Gallery is currently hosting Farewell Transmission, a two-venue exhibition of recent sculpture by Roxy Paine, for the artist’s first major New York solo exhibition in three years and the first of his sculpture with Paul Kasmin.

Over the past 25 years, Paine’s sculptures ruminate upon the clash of the human and the natural worlds, and the warring of chaos and control that result from humanity’s attempts to manage the process.  Farewell Transmission presents two distinct series, Dioramas and Dendroids; each express the artist’s anxieties about the human impact on our habitat and the mechanized tools that seek to impose order and control, often to disordered and unpredictable ends.

In his Dioramas, Paine adopts and adapts a format familiar within the natural history museum, but instead of employing human artifice to represent the natural world, Paine’s Dioramas use organic materials to represent quotidian environments where the fundamental states of the Homo Sapien can be observed. Rooted in the Greek language, diorama translates to “through that which is seen.” Paine’s Dioramas are a device through which one can examine our own habitat, culture and society.  Seemingly innocuous at first, each Diorama presents a room devoid of actual figures, yet charged with their psychological dilemmas.

Meeting Detail

Meeting (2016) is the artist’s most intimate in scale from the series, and implies through attentive details such as a ring of non-descript office chairs, the community space that hosts one of the variety twelve-step substance abuse programs.

Meeting Coffee

Experiment
Experiment, Installation View

Experiment (2015) the only diorama of an actual historical event, though one for which we have no photographs, depicts the setting of a 1950s-70s CIA surveillance program examining the effects of LSD.

Experiment Detail

Looking at this hallucinatory experience through another surveilling environment heightens the paranoid feelings of control, manipulation and misguided forensic observation. Personal associations and past encounters with these familiar spaces inevitably creep into the imagined scenes of the Diorama, collapsing the distance between the viewer and that which is on view.

Experiment Detail

Desolation Row

In Desolation Row (2017) a remarkable new work, Paine synthesizes the tree silhouettes of the Dendroids, the simulation of the Dioramas and the expansiveness of his earlier Fields series to replicate nature in solitude and at its most poignant moment.

Desolation Row

Returning to the motif of the tree, Paine presents them in Desolation Row as charred, barren, and destroyed. Positioned across a 13-ft table, Desolation Row is an unflinching portrayal of the infinite cycle of control and chaos reaching its devastating yet paradoxical conclusion where Paine leaves the question of renewal to be resolved.

Dendroids Installation View

Fusing organic forms, such as trees, flowers, and fungi with man-made structures and materials among which include stainless steel, epoxy, and polymer, Paine invents, distorts, surprises and confounds our perception of the natural and inorganic and the real and artificial.

Dendroids

The new Dendroids, Paine’s first iteration in over 5 years of his iconic stainless steel sculptures, further expand upon this multifaceted, yet imperfect, transformation of the industrial into the natural, with even more daring grafting, beguiling engineering, and wild experimentation.

Organ Tree

In the new works, tree trunks, branches and roots intertwine with lungs and hearts, or with electricity poles and debris and detritus.

Utility Pole Treet

Ground Fault (2016) poetically melds a tree’s roots and trunk with two transformers that are used to circulate electromagnetic energy.  Paine’s Dendroids continue to reveal the intrinsic affinities and twisted connectivity of a tree’s form with other plant, human and man-made systems.

Dendrils Triptych

Roxy Paine: Farewell Transmission, will be on Exhibit Through July 1st, 2011 at Paul Kasmin Gallery’s Locations at293 and 297 Tenth Avenue, at 27th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Roxy Paine Signage

Dendrils

 

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