Tag Archive | Artist

Modern Art Monday: Dan Flavin, Untitled (to the “Innovator” of Wheeling Peachblow)

Untitled to the Innovator of Wheeling Peachblow
All Photos By Gail

Dan Flavin (1933 – 1996) began to use commercially available fluorescent light tubes in 1963. This work marries color and light, bringing them into three dimensions. In dialogue withe surrounding space, the vertical and horizontal tubes both illuminate and obscure the corner — a location not typically used for displaying art. Though the emitted light transcends its physical encasement and transforms the surrounding space, Flavin avoided characterizing his work as sublime and instead considered his light installation as “situations” or proposals. “One might not think of light as a matter of fact, but I do,” he stated. “And it is…as plain and open and direct an art as you will ever find.”

Untitled to the Innovator of Wheeling Peachblow

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Cluster: A Group Show of Groupings at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Art By Dylan Egon
Art By Dylan Egon (All Photos By Gail)

Jonathan LeVine Gallery’s Summer Group Show, Cluster, features work by established artists who have previously shown at the gallery, alongside emerging talent making their JLG debut. Each has been allocated space to display clusters of work, a concept that can be approached in many unique ways, and which grants each artist the opportunity to show the full range of their aesthetic.

Art by Ron English
Art by Ron English

While some have chosen to display groupings of work that are similar or create one large piece surrounded by smaller works, others interpreted the idea of “cluster” and used it as source of inspiration.

Art By Gary Taxali
Art By Gary Taxali

Similar to an art fair, in which pieces of varying mediums and styles are shown beside each other, Cluster includes sculptures, drawings and paintings by fifteen artists who might not typically be exhibited together, including Amandine Urruty, Anton Vill, Ben Tolman, Charlie Immer, Drew Leshko, Dylan Egon, Gary Mellon, Gary Taxali, Luke O’Sullivan, Marco Mazzoni, Nicomi Nix Turner, Ron English, Sam Gibbons, Smithe One, Tran Nguyen and Troy Coulterman. Let’s check out more photos from the opening reception!

Art By Luke O'Sullivan
Art By Luke O’Sullivan

Art By Luke O'Sullivan Detail
Luke O’Sullivan Sculpture Detail

Art By Nikomi Nix Turner
Art By Nikomi Nix Turner

The Brotherhood By Nikomi Nix Turner
The Brotherhood By Nikomi Nix Turner

Spongebob Grin by Ron English
Spongebob Grin by Ron English

Snake By Amandine Urruty
Snake By Amandine Urruty

The complex, surrealist drawings of Amandine Urruty are new to me. I really love the retro-creepiness of her style.

Smile By Amandine Urruty
Smile By Amandine Urruty

Carrot By Amandine Urruty
Carrot By Amandine Urruty

Floating Bell by Troy Coulterman
Floating Bell (Edition of 7) by Troy Coulterman

The Couple by Troy Coulterman
The Couple by Troy Coulterman

Charlie Immer Cluster
Art by Charlie Immer

Charlie Immer Coiled
Coiled by Charlie Immer

Skulls + Cuteness = A Perfect Match!

Art By Smithe One
Art By Smithe One

DBF By Smithe One
DBF By Smithe One

This piece reminds me of the cover of This Classic Album.

Cluster: A Group Show of Groupings will be on exhibit only through August 20th, 2016 at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street. in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Cluster Exhibit Signage

Jonathan LeVine Signage

Modern Art Monday Presents: Artist’s Shit No. 014 By Piero Manzoni

Artists Shit
All Photos By Gail

Piero Manzoni (July 13, 1933 – February 6, 1963) was an Italian artist best known for his ironic approach to avant-garde art. His work is widely seen as a critique of the mass production and consumerism that was changing Italian society (the Italian economic miracle) after World War II. In 1961, Manzoni created Artist’s Shit (Italian: Merda d’artista), an artwork that consists of 90 small tin cans, each filled with 1.1 oz of feces, and measuring 1.9″ × 2.6″, with a label in Italian, English, French, and German stating:

Artist’s Shit
Contents 30 gr net
Freshly preserved
Produced and tinned
in May 1961

The tins were originally to be valued according to their equivalent weight in gold – $37 each in 1961 – with the price fluctuating according to the market. The contents of the cans remain a much-disputed enigma, since opening them would destroy the value of the artwork. Various theories about the contents have been proposed, including speculation that it is plaster. Over the years, the cans have spread to various art collections all over the world and netted large prices, far outstripping inflation. A tin was sold for €124,000 at Sotheby’s on May 23, 2007; in October 2008 tin 83 was offered for sale at Sotheby’s and sold for £97,250. On October 16, 2015, tin 54 was sold at Christies for the astonishing sum of £182,500.

Piero Manzoni died of myocardial infarction in his Milan studio on February 6, 1963 at just 29 years of age. His contemporary, Ben Vautier, signed Manzoni’s death certificate, declaring it a work of art.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Artists Shit

Duke A. Barnstable NYC Street Sheriff

Duke A Barnstable Stars
All Photos By Gail

We haven’t seen much of the lo-fi work of street artist Duke A. Barnstable around the Chelsea Gallery District until we spotted these assorted star-shaped NYC Street Sheriff badges plastered on an electrical box near the northwest corner of 10th Avenue and 20th Street.

Duke A Barnstable Stars

Save

Save

Save

Martin Creed, The Back Door at the Park Avenue Armory

Armory Drawing Room
All Photos and Videos By Gail

To have experienced The Back Door, Martin Creed’s interactive art exhibit installed throughout the Park Avenue Armory, was like walking into and exploring an authentically disquieting dreamscape version of Disney’s Haunted Mansion for adults who dig weird art.

Martin Creed Small Canvases

As the most mainstream-accessible part of The Back Door, two collections of small-canvas paintings can be found in the Armory’s first floor Board of Officers Room. It got much less-safe from there.

Small Canvas Painting

Crossing all media including painting, drawing, music, dance, theater, film, sculpture, fashion, and more, Martin Creed’s practice considers our everyday existence and the visible and invisible structures that shape our lives. Creed continues his ongoing exploration into rhythm, scale and order in The Back Door;  the artist’s largest installation in the US to date, which is a survey of his work from its most minimal moments to extravagant, larger-than-life installations.

Installation with Dress Form

Utilizing both the Wade Thompson Drill Hall and the historic interiors of the building, Creed re-imagines the space with opening and closing doors and curtains, a slamming piano, and a room full of balloons, among other new works made for this exhibition. These materials and situations, when grouped together, create a playful spectacle within a framework that provides the viewer with a fascinating way to counter our visually overloaded, choice-saturated culture.

Half the Air in a Given Space Signage

The most popular work in the exhibit is called Half the Air in a Given Space, which is a room filled half-way to the ceiling with large, inflated white latex balloons.

Half The Air

It was recommended that you queue up for this room as soon as you arrived, as there might be a wait of 10 minutes or more. They only let six or so people enter the room at one time. This is why:

Half the Air in a Given Space Signage

Once you squeeze your way into the room, the balloons, which are about 17″ in diameter, will be over your head, and you will need to gently bounce them upward and away from you in order to navigate your way to an exit on the other side of the room, which is marked by a red Exit sign. I wouldn’t recommended this experience to anyone who is prone to panic attacks or who has claustrophobia, or for a small child, but otherwise it is quite fun and there is no need to freak out.

Half the Air in a Given Space Signage

As you can see, I was able to get these fun photos while submerged in a sea of Balloons! When would you ever have the chance to do this again? There were assistants at the room’s exit door, to help you get out.

In the above video, I am in a room called The Parlor, in which the overhead lights flash on and off at one-second intervals for a piece called The Lights Going On and Off. The door on the other side of the room opens automatically, so it is impossible to be trapped in there. Again, no need to panic!

Wade Thompson Drill Hall

Next, I entered the Wade Thompson Drill Hall, which is a massive room the size of an airplane hangar. There is a screen suspended from the ceiling about midway into the room, which shows nearly static film clips of people doing mundane things like sitting and staring.

Film Clip Woman

This is a woman sitting in a room.

Film Clip Room

This is the room she is sitting in. There are six short films ranging in length from 1 minute 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Exhibition Continues Sign

Across that room to the right, you will see the above sign with an arrow. Follow it to an open door and enter an entirely new space.

Funny Walks

You are now in a long corridor that extends the length of the building, which is divided into 9 small kiosks, each showing a different short film. The first one shows different people crossing the same street, one at a time, while demonstrating a “funny walk,” as the famous Monty Python sketch would call it.

Naked Man

Another film is this naked man standing in a room with occasional close-ups of his ass.

This  video clip is from a film that shows a numerical countdown.

This one is called Fuck Off. Either there was no video, or it just wasn’t working, for this audio-only clip of someone using the F Word, a lot. (Warning: NSFW)

Squatting Woman

I didn’t stick around long enough to find out why she was squatting.

Parental Advisory

When you see this sign, you are about to watch a video of a penis going from flaccid to erect, and back again. Hashtag-trying-too-hard.

These Roving Musicians are fun to stop and listen to as they wander through the various rooms. Those curtains they are seen walking through open and close by themselves, and constitute a separate artwork called A Curtain Opening and Closing.

White Grand Piano
The Veteran’s Room

Grandfather Clock
A Large Piece of Furniture Partially Obstructing a Door

Field and Staff Room

In the Field and Staff Room, you will see chairs stacked on top of other chairs and tables stacked on other tables, a row of small cactus plants in front of a mirror (lower right in the above photo) and a video installation.

IMG_2450

I felt like I was back in the ’60s.

Painting in the North Corridor
Abstract Painting in the North Corridor

Veterans Room 2
Veterans Room

Even if art is not your thing, you would probably have enjoyed its distractions as you explore an amazing historical building and imagine what types of ghosts must inhabit this obviously haunted space.

Find out more about Martin Creed’s The Back Door, which has now closed at This Link!

Park Ave Armory Exterior and Signage