Tag Archive | Artist

Shepard Fairy’s Obey Lotus Flower Stencil Lives On!

Shepard Fairey Obey Lotus

Fives years is forever in the life of a piece of NYC Street Art, but Shepard Fairey’s Obey Lotus Flower Stencil, which first went up at the end of June in 2011, is still loud and proud on the southern facade of 213 Bowery, at the corner of Rivington. I passed by it over the weekend and it looks darn good for its age.

Shepard Fairey Obey Lotus

Here’s a view of that corner from the traffic island in the middle of Bowery. And doesn’t This look familiar?

Wayne White, I’m Having a Dialogue With The Universe, And You’re Just Sitting There at Joshua Liner Gallery

F.U. MONEY
F.U. MONEY By Wayne White (All Photos and Video By Gail)

Joshua Liner Gallery is currently hosting its second major solo exhibition of work from Los Angeles based artist Wayne White, entitled I’m Having a Dialogue With The Universe, And You’re Just Sitting There. This exhibition is White’s most ambitious project to date with the Gallery, featuring all aspects of the artist’s multidisciplinary practice: including kinetic sculptures, murals, work on paper, a wallpaper installation, and White’s signature Word Paintings on vintage offset lithographs.

HAD IT GOIN ON BUT LOST IT THEN GOT IT BACK THEN FUCKED UP AND LOST IT
HAD IT GOIN ON BUT LOST IT THEN GOT IT BACK THEN FUCKED UP AND LOST IT

From puppeteer, to painter, illustrator, sculptor, wordsmith —and even typographic artist —the enormous breadth of White’s creative output is part of a career spanning over 35 years. For this body of work, the artist deconstructs themes surrounding vanity, hubris, and the inflated egos of artists, as he explains, “I’m drawn to the humor of vanity. The title of the show is an artist’s private, nasty thoughts about how he or she is superior to the public and is so worthy of praise and attention. It’s my way of popping bubbles and kicking pedestals.”

THOSE GUYS ARE PUSSIES
THOSE GUYS ARE PUSSIES

Humor in particular is among the strongest touchstones of White’s work, explored throughout the entirety of his practice, and most discernibly in his word painting series — painted, often with profane epithets, on vintage offset lithographs of kitschy landscapes. Cleverly wry phrases such as “THOSE GUYS ARE PUSSIES,” and “HAD IT GOIN ON BUT LOST IT THEN GOT IT BACK THEN FUCKED UP AND LOST IT,” interrupt the scenery, often integrated within the formal compositions of the offset prints.

I'M GONNA PLAY LIKE YOU DIDN SAY THAT

White pays special attention to the structure of each letterform in the word paintings, creating dynamic optical interactions.   This arrangement of forms requires careful reading, as letters transform from clearly legible words into objects with vanishing points and buoyancy. In contrast to recent word paintings from White, these new works revisit an earlier style from the artist that evokes strong influences of Surrealism. Meanwhile, F.U. MONEY elicits Dadaist influences with its mixing of letterforms and unorthodox punctuation, superimposed on a Parisian scene at dusk. Adding to the Surrealist undertones, and echoing the walls of Peggy Guggenheim’s art collection, the installation of the works will extend from the gallery walls, held upright by oversized plywood hands.

Covered Wagon

Other works engage with the artist’s nostalgia for his youth, and Southern heritage. In Covered Wagon, White paints a pre-industrial American carriage, spiraling into the center of a found lithograph, while a series of works on paper explore various commercial signage from mid-century America.

Waynetopia

White’s most recent collaborative work — a wallpaper installation with Brooklyn-based Flavor Paper — is also installed in the Gallery. Entitled Waynetopia, the wallpaper design is adapted from a mural in the artist’s dining room at his home in Los Angeles. Inspired by 19th century French scenic wallpaper, the design features a fantastical landscape with tropical foliage, mountains, majestic skies, and White’s trademark painted words.

Youre Just Agreeing With Me
You’re Just Agreeing With Me So I’ll Shut Up

Here’s a video of one of White’s Kitchen Word Sculptures.

FUCKIT
FUCKIT

Instagrat
Instagrat

 

Wayne White’s  I’m Having a Dialogue With The Universe, And You’re Just Sitting There will be on Exhibit Through October 8th, 2016 at Joshua Liner Gallery, Located at West 28th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

FUCK THAT
FUCKTHAT

Wayne White Installation View

Lars Fisk, Mr. Softee at Marlborough Gallery

Mr Softee Orb
All Photos By Gail

Chelsea’s Marlborough Gallery is currently hosting the first solo exhibit by New York-based artist Lars Fisk, presenting a group of seven of his signature ball sculptures. Ranging from pea-size to 15 feet in diameter, the works engage mundane subjects from pencil stubs to parking lots. These are fashioned, in their actual materials, into perfected spheres to re-define the object as sculpture. Made primarily by hand in the artist’s Red Hook Brooklyn studio, the sculptures function as a kind of logo for their subject, distilling and encapsulating the physical essence of an object.

Mr Softee Orb

Everyday objects, especially ones whose design is so perfected or irreducible as to preempt change, are among Fisk’s favorite subjects. Others are ubiquitous enough to go unheralded, and the artist is keen to ennoble them. In Fisk’s hands a New York City summer staple, the Mister Softee ice cream truck, becomes a symbol for the city itself — an avatar of freewheeling capitalism and boundless appetite.

Mr Softee Orb

Lot Ball
Lot Ball

While his vehicles have been popular subjects, the series actually originated with simpler sculptures of streets —asphalt spheres (a form with no beginning or end and the three dimensional equivalent of an allover composition) painted with yellow and white lines: an embodiment of movement and the continuous fluid interconnection of paved roads. This idea has culminated in Lot Ball, Fisk’s largest sculpture to date, which stands alone, floor-to-ceiling, in the biggest, most dramatic room of the gallery. Approaching a 1:1-scale distillation of the Queens Costco parking lot, with it’s graphic lines and arrows and formal curbing, the work makes a strong case for beauty in the most banal site imaginable.

Here are some other piece from this fun show!

T and S Self Storage Warehouse First Month Free Ball

T & S Self Storage Warehouse First Month Free Ball

T and S Self Storage Warehouse First Month Free Ball

Trash Can Ball
Trash Can Ball

Street Ball (Cobble)
Street Ball (Cobble)

I think the Manhole Cover is a nice touch!

Subway Balls
Subway Balls: Union Square and Spring Street

My favorites are these subway tile mosaic balls with abbreviated names of stations. Very Cool!

Stop Ball (23rd Street)
Subway Ball: 23rd Street

Mr. Softee By Lars Fisk will be on Exhibit Through October 15th, 2016 at Marlborough Gallery, Located at 545 West 25th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Jean Arp, Configuration in Serpentine Movements

Configuration in Serpentine Movements
Photo By Gail

In his later years, Jean Arp produced three-dimensional sculptures that he modeled in plaster and translated into stone and bronze. Plaster enabled Arp to experiments with new, unique forms, such as the amoeba-like shapes in Configuration in Serpentine Movements (1950). Referring to his biomorphic art as “l’art concret” (concrete art), Arp emphasized how this style evoked natural forms without imitation or specific definition, as if the sculpture had been created by natural forces rather than his own hand.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Ian Davenport, Doubletake at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Ian Davenport Installation View 2
All Photos By Gail

Paul Kasmin Gallery is currently hosting Doubletake, an exhibition of new paintings by the British artist Ian Davenport. This is Davenport’s first solo show at the gallery since 2013’s Colorfall.

Primavesi Magenta Purple
Primavesi Magenta Purple

In Doubletake, Davenport explores the chromatic essence of historical masterpieces, the palette of many of the paintings being inspired by a canonical work. He has ranged widely through history for his sources, paying homage to paintings spanning from the 16th century to the 20th, creating a remarkable record of a painter’s taste and powerfully demonstrating how a great tradition of historical pictures can inform contemporary art.

Doubletake

His technique, driven by an enduring fascination with the materiality of paint and the process of painting, is similar in each. First, after studying the painting in depth and gaining an intuitive understanding of its colors and hues, he goes to work using his signature technique, which delivers elegant vertical lines cascading down the panels into rich puddles of color.

Doubletake

Their effect is both sublime, in their evocation of waterfalls, and subliminal, in their reminders of history. Referenced paintings include Van Gogh’s The Church in Auvers-sur-Oise, View from the Chevet, (1890) pulling out the rich blues of the sky, the green and beige from the lawn and path, and the reds from the roof of the church.

Splat Paintings

Other works that have inspired him include Jan Brueghel the Elder’s Flowers In A Wooden Vessel, (1606), Mada Primavesi (1912) by Gustav Klimt, and The Marriage of the Virgin (1504) by the Italian Renaissance master Perugino.

Cadmium Yellow
Cadmium Yellow

Each time, Davenport uses the colors in the historical work as a reference point to initiate his own color sequences and explorations of movement, surface and light. In so doing, he questions how color gives shape to a picture, helping to structure the background and foreground in representational pictures, and produce rhythm and dynamism in abstract art.

Ian Davenport’s Doubletake will be on Exhibit Through October 22nd, 2016 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 293 Tenth Avenue (SW Corner of 27th Street) in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Ian Davenport Signage

Ian Davenport Installation View 1

Art By Chad Wys at The Joseph Gross Gallery

Sculpture by Chad Wys

All Photos By Gail

Multidisciplinary artist, Chad Wys has some really fantastic work in  Not The Sum of Its Parts, Just The Parts, up now at the Joseph Gross Gallery. The two person show (which also includes works by Jesse Draxler) examines the variables of abstraction, conceptualism, and mark­making. In this exhibit, Wys rips apart and questions the use of traditional arts materials, rediscovering and reevaluating the limits of the surface.

Sculpture by Chad Wys

Painting by Chad Wys

The title of the show is a reactionary statement against the Aristotelian philosophy that “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.”  Rather, the title attempts to highlight, in a multi­layered approach, that each part is essential, individual, unique, and not­ to­ be overlooked in its contribution to the “whole.” Both artists utilize this principle in their practice.

Paintings by Chad Wys

Chad Wys is interested in manipulating found objects – the more in a state of depreciation, the better – he adds new life, meaning and function to existing materials and products, adding to the object’s history and its journey. Throughout his work he has maintained a longstanding fascination with the ideals of conceptualism. Informed by Dadaism and minimalism as well as post­modernist philosophy, Wys’ work examines visuality, from images and objects to decorations and art, and how the reproduction of these materials influence our visual experience.

Painting by Chad Wys

Not The Sum Of Its Parts, Just The Parts, Featuring the Works of  Chad Wys, will be on Exhibit Through October 1st, 2016 at Joseph Gross Gallery, Located at 548 W 28th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Paintings by Chad Wys