Tag Archive | Artist

Modern Art Monday Presents: American Gothic By Grant Wood

American Gothic by Grant Wood
Photo By Gail

Premiering at the Art Institute of Chicago in October 1930, Grant Wood’s American Gothic captivated the public’s imagination and catapulted Wood into the national spotlight overnight. The painting depicts a couple — modeled on Wood’s sister, Nan, and his Dentist — who stand in front of a Midwestern house. The house is notable for its lone “gothic” window, a typical feature of the then-popular Carpenter Gothic style of architecture, in which gothic elements are used in otherwise simple, modern wood structures.

Wood identified the pair as father and daughter, though the work was initially assumed to be a portrait of a husband and wife. “I simply invented some ‘American Gothic’ people to stand in front of a house of this type,” Wood later explained. From the painting’s debut onward, its meaning has been the subject of endless speculation. What has remained central is its seeming embodiment of something stereotypically American.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables, on View Through June 10th, 2018 at The Whitney Museum of American Art in the Meatpacking District, NYC.


Rabbit Tile Mosaic By Invader at The Standard Hotel, Meatpacking District

Invader Rabbit
Photos By Gail

Spotted this guy adjacent to the Skating Rink right outside the Standard Hotel on Washington Street in the Meatpacking District, NYC.

Invader Rabbit

Modern Art Monday Presents: Agnes Pelton, Sea Change

Agnes Pelton Sea Change
Photo By Gail

The forms of Agnes Pelton’s Sea Change (1931) channel the movement and energy of water, which the artist regarded as a metaphor for the ebb and flow of human thought. Created the year she left Long Island for the Southern California desert, Sea Change can be understood as a meditation on personal transitions; however, Pelton refused such specific readings of her art. Influenced by modern Theosophy, an esoteric blend of religion and philosophy, as well as the mysticism of the American Symbolist painters, Pelton believed that art channels the universal energies of the natural world through color and light, which are experienced rather than purely seen. She described color as “active,” likening it to a voice or “vibration” that is ideally perceived like “the fragrance of a flower [which] fills the consciousness with the essence of its life.”

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

“Mom, I’m Gay”

Mom I'm Gay
Photo By Gail

Hey, if you need to find a way to come out to your Mom, and she is also a Star Wars Fan, maybe you can do so via this fun poster, which I spotted on Gansevoort Street out front of the Whitney Museum. You can buy this piece, and other work by artist Denis Ouch via Artfinder at This Link.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Joan Snyder, Hard Sweetness (From the Stroke Series)

Hard Sweetness

Hard Sweetness (1971) is one of Joan Snyder’s Stroke paintings, a series in which abstract imagery and mark-making register personal and political struggles and decisions. Snyder began making art in the late 1960s, a time when men dominated the art world. Her sensibility and style were inspired by feminism, music, Expressionism, and her own life experience, as well as dislike of the distilled macho aesthetics of Minimalism.

Hard Sweetness uses strokes of paint in soft stains, loose washes, and thicker scumbling ( applying a very thin coat of opaque paint to give a softer or duller effect) to create rhythmic, almost musical passages of color across the canvas. As the title of this work suggests, Snyder blurs the distinction between the senses of sight, taste and perhaps even sound and smell. Like her contemporary Eva Hesse, she balances a feminine palette with a muscular formal complexity.

Photographed in the Jewish Museum in Manhattan.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Rubber House on an Exercise Bike

Trimcycle By Battle Creek
All Photos By Gail

Trimcycle By Battle Creek is the name of this sculpture, which is comprised of a Pink Silicone Rubber House draped over a vintage Exercise Bicycle. It is part of the exhibit Bent, by artist Brian Tolle, from his group series known collectively as Levittown.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

Here’s a bit more about the series from C24 Gallery:

A keen observer of domestic life and identity, Brian Tolle furthers his interest of politics of place in his Levittown sculptures. The sculptures are inspired by the planned housing community, Levittown: the historic town in Long Island, NY, which became the archetype of American suburban life in the early 1950s. Each of Tolle’s eleven sculptures is a precise scaled model of an original Levittown home — cast from the same mold, varying only in color and displaying the architectural details of the original structures.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

The sculptural houses themselves resemble deflated or melting membranes, and are supported by various appropriated mementos of suburban life – found toys, tire swing, shopping cart, a plastic nativity set, and a recliner. These iconographic items rest underneath and inside silicone rubber skins of the houses, emphasizing a dialogue between sites and domestic artifacts. As the title of the exhibition suggests, the artworks presented in Bent provoke a re-reading, or discord between reality and fiction. The formal play that Tolle visually articulates between shapes and textures, private and public spaces presents a challenge to standard architectural, as well as behavioral conventions and norms.

Photographed at the C24 Gallery in Manhattan.

Flight/Equip.: United Airlines 3480 E7W

Yes, It Exists: Deep Fried Toy Tanks

Deep Fried Toy Tank
Photos By Gail

This deep-fried toy tank is one of seven identical models that make up the artwork entitled Visual Art, Add Oil! March Forward! (19992005) by Chinese artist Zheng Guogu.

Deep Fried Toy Tanks

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Art and China After 1989 at the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.