Tag Archive | Artist

Sergio Romagnolo’s Red Plastic Drumkit

Red Plastic Drum Kit Front View
All Photos By Gail

It’s been nearly ten years since my gig writing for Modern Drummer magazine came to an unceremonious end, but I still get nostalgic when I see a work of art that pays homage to the drums. Check out this crazy kit by Brazilian artist Sergio Romagnolo, which is made from hand-molded, headed plastic.

Red Plastic Drumkit Side View

Here’s the kit shot from an angle that let’s you see the finer sculpture details, as the plastic dripping down from the rack-mounted toms onto the bass drum.

Red Plastic Drumkit Rear View

The full sculpted kit is comprised of a kick, or bass, drum, two rack-mounted toms, one floor tom, one snare drum, what is either meant to be a ride or crash cymbal, and one hi-hat cymbal, both on stands. The only crucial thing he left out — besides the hi-hat and bass drum pedals —  is the drum stool. Perhaps that feature was omitted to keep would-be drummers from sitting down and trying to play it!

Sergio Romagnolo Red Plastic Drumkit Detail

If you look closely, you will notice that Sergio has added small Red Rose, which is visible between the two mounted toms! In fact that is no accident, as the official title of the piece is Drums With Flower (2019). This artist prefers to create sculptures that explore the urban and industrial universe, such as cars, buildings, airplanes, cameras, and trash cans.

Red Plastic Drumkit Installation View

In the above installation view, you can see works by two other Brazilian artists: a painting by Jose Leonilson on the wall, and a reflective sculpture by Vanderlei Lopes on the carpet, foreground.

Photographed at the Frieze Art Fair, 2019, in the Booth for Galeria Marilia Razuk of Sao Paolo, Brazil.

Red Drum Kit

 

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Josef Albers, Homage to the Square: On Near Sky

Homage to the Square
Photo By Gail

Following an influential career at The Bauhaus school in Wiemer, Germany (191933) Josef Albers fled the Nazi regime and emigrated to the United States, where he taught at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, and then at Yale in Connecticut. Beginning in 1949 and continuing over the next twenty-five years, he created his celebrated Homage to the Square series, which is composed of more than a thousand works including paintings, drawings, prints, and tapestries. These works are based on a template of geometric abstraction, a mathematically determined format of several squares overlapping or nesting within one another. These works represent Alber’s experiments with theories of color and spatial relationships, which were informed by his studies of Mexican pyramids and pre-Colombian architectonic principles. Homage to the Square: On Near Sky was painted in 1963.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Hashimoto Contemporary Gallery Presents Dan Lam’s Delicious Monster

Dan Lam Delicious Monster
All Photos By Gail

While my back was turned, Spoke Art Gallery suddenly became Hashimoto Contemporary Gallery. I understand that this involved a simple name change, and that the gallery is being run by the same people, which is a relief, because Spoke/Hashimoto is walking distance from my apartment, and it always has pretty cool art! Example: their latest exhibit is Delicious Monster, a solo exhibition by Dallas-based artist Dan Lam, who is a lady. Delicious Monster is Dan’s fist solo exhibition at the gallery.

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

Dan Lam is known for her biomorphic sculptures — which she often paints in vibrant, fluorescent colors — that appear to ooze and drip from the shelves on which they perch. These sculptures are made from quick-drying foam, and so they are deceptively light weight, despite appearing to be very heavy.

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

For Delicious Monster, the artist continues to explore opposing themes of the beautiful and repulsive,  and how often these two different sentiments can come from within the same source. With this in mind, the new sculptures explore color and form while experimenting with new materials and layering processes.

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

Dan Lam Delicious Monster Detail

To me, these layered sculptures recall exotic undersea coral, but Dan was actually inspired by the Monstera Deliciosa fruit, whose scientific name literally means ‘delicious monster.’ Resembling an ear of corn with a green exterior, this hexagon patterned fruit is sweet, delicious and tropical, yet it can cause severe throat and skin irritation if eaten before it has fully ripened.

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

Fascinated by the fruit’s tempting contradictions, the works in Delicious Monster explore this relatable concept: patience is often tested by temptation, and the excitement and desire to have an experience before the appropriate moment can often result in dangerous consequences. The sculptures above show examples of a series within the exhibit where these forms appear to be covered in beads or pearls. Dan creates the look by affixing “half beads” to the exterior of the form before paint is applied.

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

Exploring a variety of textures, from the shimmering iridescent to pointed spikes, Dan’s sculptures appear almost lifelike, as if they were living organisms from a psychedelic universe. Simultaneously alluring and unsettling, their textures, candy colored hues and organic shapes draw the viewer in, tempting you to touch them and enter their alternate universe.

Please enjoy a few more photos from the show:

Dan Lam Delicious Monster Installation View

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

The gallery installed a ‘Selfie-Wall,’ whose surface emulates the texture of one of Dan’s spiked forms. I was not present at the opening reception, but I can imagine that this wall was very popular!

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

She also created these miniature sculptures for the gallery’s reception desk Adorable.

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

Dan Lam’s  Delicious Monster Will be on Exhibit Through Saturday, May 25th, 2019 at Hashimoto Contemporary New York (Formerly Spoke Art), Located at 210 Rivington Street (between Pitt & Ridge). Hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Dan Lam Delicious Monster Installation View

Dan Lam Delicious Monster Installation View

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

Dan Lam Delicious Monster

Modern Art Monday Presents: Stanton Macdonald-Wright, Synchromy No. 3

Synchromy No 3
Photo By Gail

Although this abstract composition, Synchromy No. 3 (1917), bears many traces of European Cubism — angular shapes, fragmented forms, and multiple perspectives — it asserts the primacy of color as a key component of space and form. In 1912, Stanton Macdonald-Wright, together with the painter Morgan Russell, coined the term Synchromism to describe abstract compositions primarily concerned with the rhythmic use of color — a phenomenon they likened to a symphony’s use of sound. Synchromism was one of many diverse approaches to abstraction that flourished in the Americas and Europe on the 1910s, radically departing from traditional vocabularies of painting and sculpture

Photographed in The Brooklyn Museum.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Alejandro Puente, Untitled

Alejandro Puente Untitled
Photo By Gail

Alejandro Puente (19332013) was at the fore of a group of artists from La Plata, Argentina, who shared with American Minimalist and Conceptual artists of the 1960s a devotion to the rigorous exploration of systems of color and form. This composition reflects Puente’s preference for the primary colors as they appear unmixed on a color wheel. Arranged together, four equilateral triangles make up a single, larger triangle, with the three primary colors radiating out from an anchor in black. An even white strip runs along two sides of each triangle, suggesting a state of incompleteness while also creating the perimeter of overall composition. As this composite work suggests, the abstract vocabularies practiced by La Plata artists effectively abandoned traditional painting by embracing the shaped canvas, the support assuming its own identity in space as an object

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eduardo Kobra’s Mount Rushmore of Art Mural, Chelsea Gallery District

Mount Rushmore of Art
All Photos By Gail

It’s hard to believe that Eduardo Kobra’s Mount Rushmore of Art mural has been up for five months already, and it took me that long to photograph it in its finished state; but that what I finally had the chance to do on Easter Sunday, when I went for walk on the High Line.

Kobras Mt Rushmore In Progress

Located at 10th Avenue and 22nd Street, directly above the often-shuttered-and-reopened Empire Diner, I happened to be in that neighborhood on November 3rd, 2018, while Kobra and his team worked on monumental piece, detailing the likenesses of four contemporary art legends: Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. I was able to take a few photos of the mural as a work-in-progress on the afternoon, so I thought it would be fun to share them alongside photos of the completed mural, which takes its name from the monument located in South Dakota, swapping out US Presidents for North American Artists.

Kobras Mt Rushmore In Progress

Finishing touches are added to the face of Keith Haring (19581990). Frida Kahlo’s beautiful face seems to be completed at this point. She lived from 1907 to 1954.

Kobras Mt Rushmore In Progress

Kobra works on the face of Andy Warhol (19281987). The Dollar Sign visible under Warhol’s likeness, which is a motif from his artworks, has been replaced in the finished mural by a dinosaur wearing crown: an image popularized by Basquiat, who was a disciple of Warhol.

Kobras Mt Rushmore In Progress

This mural was completed in  collaboration with HG Contemporary Gallery in NYC.

Mount Rushmore of Art

Mount Rushmore of Art

 

Derek Fordjourm, Half Mast

Half Mast Derek Fordjour
Photos By Gail

With Half Mast, Derek Fordjour debuts a new work that reflects on the current national reckoning with mass shootings, and the relentless threat of violence against Black and Brown bodies. A portrait of this divided moment in U.S. history, Half Mast presents law officers, students, and ordinary civilians in one compressed, shared space. Alongside teddy bears and balloons reminiscent of street-side memorials, some figures appear marked with targets while others have been reduced to silhouettes.

Fordjour’s image holds no one person or group responsible for the violence, even as it speaks to loss and abuse of power. Painted brightly in his signature graphic style, the work points to possibilities of a future civic movement or celebration. Derek Fordjour first made Half Mast as a painting; here, in his first solo museum exhibition, it is presented as a public art installation in the form of a large vinyl print, located outdoors at the intersection of Gansevoort and Washington Streets, across the street ands down one block from the Whitney Museum, and directly across from the end of the High Line.

Half Mast Derek Fordjour