Tag Archive | Shaped Canvas

Modern Art Monday Presents: Alejandro Puente, Untitled

Alejandro Puente Untitled
Photo By Gail

Alejandro Puente (19332013) was at the fore of a group of artists from La Plata, Argentina, who shared with American Minimalist and Conceptual artists of the 1960s a devotion to the rigorous exploration of systems of color and form. This composition reflects Puente’s preference for the primary colors as they appear unmixed on a color wheel. Arranged together, four equilateral triangles make up a single, larger triangle, with the three primary colors radiating out from an anchor in black. An even white strip runs along two sides of each triangle, suggesting a state of incompleteness while also creating the perimeter of overall composition. As this composite work suggests, the abstract vocabularies practiced by La Plata artists effectively abandoned traditional painting by embracing the shaped canvas, the support assuming its own identity in space as an object

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Alvin Loving, Septehedron 34

Septehedron 34
Photo By Gail

Alvin Loving (19352005) once described geometric shape as “a sort of mundane form that could be very, very dull unless a great deal was done with it.” For him, however, geometry ultimately became an arena in which to develop a dramatic color sensibility. Juxtaposing neon-bright pigments, in Septehedron 34 (1970) he created the illusion that the painting’s forms recede or advance relative to one another.  At the same time, his use of geometric forms emphasized the flat surface of the canvas, from which a tension emerges between real and imagined space. Also notable for its visible brush stocks, Loving’s shaped canvas takes up the challenge of making all seven sides of a heptahedron visible at once.

In 1969, Alvin Loving became the first African American artist to have a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum.

Septehedron 34

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s, On View Through August 31st, 2019 at the Whitney Museum in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Elizabeth Murray, Once

Once
Photo By Gail

In 1978, Elizabeth Murray (1940 – 2007) made a series of irregular, star-shaped paintings with the aim, she said, of “trying to complicate and obfuscate the edges” of her medium. Indeed, the jostling contours and vivid colors of Once appear to explode outward, as if pressing the very form on the canvas into new arrangements. Murray’s dynamic compositions, charged brush strokes, and radical disruption of the frame transform the picture plane into both surface and object. While these paintings appear purely abstract, hints of imagery and reference return in subsequent works. Drawing on Cubism, Surrealism and Minimalism, Murray’s fragmented geometries and biomorphic shapes reinvigorated formalist painting in the 1970s and 1980s.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Erik Parker, Undertow, at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Installation View
All Photos By Gail

When everyone else was waiting on line to get into the Mark Ryden exhibit across the street, I was in the newest addition to the Paul Kasmin Gallery empire taking photos of Eric Parker’s latest show (and third solo-exhibition with the gallery), which had opened the previous night. Because timing is everything.

Talking Point
Talking Point, 2015

Talking Point Detail
Talking Point, Detail (Above and Below)

Talking Point Detail

Erik Parker’s Undertow is an exhibition of new paintings which represent a confluence of ideas and styles explored in previous bodies of work including the Maps, Heads, Landscapes and Hieroglyphics. Parker’s iconic, highly-saturated palette and intricate compositions are amplified by collage and airbrush techniques that create a balance of density and open space.

Taste Maker
Taste Maker, 2015

Undertow offers insight into the evolution of Parker’s work over the last two decades. Here, the artist continues to critically chart the world’s current political, social, and economic landscapes with compositions brimming with references to media, popular culture, music, and art history. Synthesizing multiple elements from his myriad styles into new dynamic compositions, the artist works at breaking down the metanarratives of late modernist painting while simultaneously digesting the pictorial chatter of scrolling feeds of social media.

Offshore
Offshore, 2015

Highlighted in the exhibition are Parker’s new shaped canvases with which he develops the narrative possibilities of form. In Offshore the support structure of the canvas takes the shape of binocular lenses, framing the action as if seen from afar.

Offshore Detail
Offshore, Detail

Disconnected
Disconnected, 2015

Parker’s large-scale, two-part shaped canvas titled Disconnected, features a Pyramid representing the global elite. The pyramid is physically separated from the second canvas – literally leaving the rest of the picture, or perhaps, society behind.

Front Runner
Front Runner, 2015

Erik Parker’s Undertow will be on Exhibit Through January 23rd, 2016 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 297 Tenth Avenue in the Chelsea Gallery. District.

Undertow Signage