Tag Archive | The Met

Eye on Design: DCW Side Chair By Charles and Ray Eames

DCW Side Chair
Photos By Gail

This modern and affordable dining-room chair was designed by the American husband-and-wife team Charles and Ray Eames. Built after an exhaustive period of testing, the different parts of the chair were fabricated using heat and pressure to bend the plywood. The DCW Side Chair (1946) was lauded for being both ergonomic and comfortable

The Eames‘ pioneering use of new materials and technologies transformed the way people decorated their homes, introducing functional, affordable, and often highly sculptural objects and furnishings to so many middle-class Americans.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

DCW Side Chair

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Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Fashions From Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons Art of The In-Between at The Met!

Installation View
All Photos By Gail

Every year , the Metropolitan Museum of Art hosts a fashion exhibit full of mind-blowing, ‘wearable’ works of art. We enjoy making multiple visits during each exhibit’s tenure, which generally lasts into late summer, and taking way too many photos than we will never do anything with. Because too may photos is a thing. and it is how we roll.

Pink Dress with Brace

For spring/summer 2017,  the Costume Institute’s exhibition examines the work of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, founder of Comme des Garçons (French for “Like Boys”), who is known for her avant-garde designs and ability to challenge conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and fashionability. The thematic show features approximately 140 examples of Kawakubo’s womenswear for Comme des Garçons dating from the early 1980s to her most recent collection, many with heads and wigs created and styled by Julien d’Ys. 90% of the designs are just out of control, crazy couture that no one would ever wear anywhere but the runway, or one time only to a gala where you need to be remembered for wearing a dress that comes with its own cage, or something.

2 Pink Dresses

The galleries illustrate the designer’s revolutionary experiments in “in-betweenness”—the space between boundaries. Objects are organized into nine aesthetic expressions of interstitiality in Kawakubo’s work: Absence/Presence, Design/Not Design, Fashion/Anti-Fashion, Model/Multiple, Then/Now, High/Low, Self/Other, Object/Subject, and Clothes/Not Clothes. Kawakubo breaks down the imaginary walls between these dualisms, exposing their artificiality and arbitrariness.

Pink and Blue Dress

If you are intrigued by the Pink Presses in this post, which is how I was able to distill the exhibit for this blog, then you need to check this shit out in person, because it is just insane.

Flowered Dress

18th Century Punk Installation View

18th Century Punk
18th Century Punk,  Autumn/Winter 2016 – 2017

Look: Proof that this ‘dress’ fits on a human body!

18th Century Punk

Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons Art of The In-Between Runs Through September 4th, 2017 at The Met, NYC.

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Eye On Design: Art Deco Lamp By Donald Deskey

Donald Deskey Art Deco Lamp
All Photos By Gail

Donald Deskey  (1894 – 1989) creator of the interiors at Radio City Music Hall, is a towering figure of modern design. This Art Deco Lamp (circa 1927) is a response to the upward thrust of the New York City skyline. Its boxy proportion echo a tall, narrow building, while on the two side panels, rectilinear puzzle-like patterns similarly evoke compressed architectural forms.

Donald Deskey Art Deco Lamp

The use of frosted glass in different textures activates the lamp’s surface, even as it diffuses the emitted light, and its compactness attests to Deskey’s awareness that he was typically designing for small domestic interiors.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Morning, Interior By Maximilien Luce

Morning Interior
Photo By Gail

This intimate scene, Morning, Interior (1890) depicts artist Maximilien Luce’s close friend, fellow painter, Neo-Impressionist Gustave Perrot getting up and dressing as morning light streams through a garret window. Luce enlivened the traditional subject of an artist in his humble living quarters with a vivid palette of red, orange, yellow and blue, applied in stippled brushstrokes, in keeping with the newly minted technique of pointillism. Little is known about Perrot, aside from the fact that he died young. In 1892, his brief career was remembered in a fifteen-work tribute held at Salon de Independants in Paris.

Morning Interior Detail
Morning, Interior, Detail

Modern Art Monday Presents: Bouquet of Flowers in a Vase By Vincent Van Gogh

Bouquet of Flowers in a Vase
Photo By Gail

This still life, Bouquet of Flowers in a Vase (1890) is not mentioned in Vincent Van Gogh’s letters and has puzzled scholars as to its place in his artistic production. The subject enjoys a certain rapport with the mixed bouquet of summer flowers he made in Paris; the quasi-abstract floral wallpaper design in Berceuse of Arles , and the white porcelain vase in the Irises of Saint-Remy (both paintings also on exhibit at The Met). However, the palette and style of this painting, especially its distinctive blues and ochers and graphic, brick-shape hatchings, link it firmly with the landscapes made just prior to his death in Auvers on July 29, 1890.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Georges Braque, Woman Seated at an Easel

Woman Seated at an Easle
Photo By Gail

Georges Braque’s painting, Woman Seated at an Easel (1936) is marked by the sand-laced pigment and curvilinear forms of Braque’s later work, and presents a seated female artist with palette and brush in hand. Set in the artists own Varengeville studio on the Normandy coast, it is one of about ten paintings that depicts figures engaging in artistic or musical activities.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Stuart Davis, Percolator

Percolator
Photo By Gail

Influenced by the Cubist language of flat, overlapping planes and wedges, Stuart Davis (1892 – 1964) used geometric shapes in related colors to create this still life, Percolator (1927). Here, he deconstructs the cylindrical forms of a mass-produced, percolator coffeepot and renders the everyday object both abstract and undefinable. By choosing an industrially produced consumer product as his subject, Davis put a new spin on the spatial innovations of the previous decade’s European avant-garde art movements.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.