Tag Archive | Painting

Modern Art Monday Presents: Count No Count by Ross Bleckner

Count No Count by Ross Bleckner
Photo By Gail

Ross Bleckner’s Count No Count (1989) is one of a series of memento mori paintings that the artist began to make in the mid-1980s. The suggestion of flickering lights in the work serves as a reminder to viewers of their own mortality, and for Bleckner — an AIDS activist — of the many lives lost to the AIDS epidemic. Bleckner engages both the formal and metaphorical qualities of light, yielding a work that shifts between abstraction and symbolic representation. To achieve the appearance of light within a darkened void, the artist blended wax into oil paint, creating a luminous surface that conveys what he describes as “this almost continual light that comes from inside.”

Photographed as Part of Fast Forward: Painting From The 1980s at the Whitney Museum of Americana Art, on Exhibit Through May 14th, 2017.

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Favorite Pink Artworks From the Affordable Art Fair, Spring 2017!

AAFNY Spring 2017
All Photos By Gail

You say you want Pink Things? I got yer Pink Things right here. The Spring edition of the Affordable Art Fair has come and gone from NYC, until it returns in the fall, and we had a ton of fun this year seeing many old friend and lots of exciting new artworks all priced to own! Affordable Art!

Collect Art Yourself

With so very many galleries exhibiting at the fair from all over the globe, we like to distil it down by choosing our favorite Pink Artworks and bringing them to your face, which will give you a good idea of the scope of painting, photography, sculpture and multi-media that finds its way into the two levels of the Metropolitan Pavilion when the AAF rolls into town. Though the fair is over for now, you can still purchase many of these pieces, or others by the same artist, from the galleries via their brick and mortar locations, or websites. No worries; I am going to tell you everything you need to know.

Pink Level

Let’s head on up to the Pink Level, shall we?

Crown By Camomile Hixon at Soraya Cartategui Art Gallery

The Soraya Cartategui Art Gallery (Spain) showcased many canvas works made with glitter, like this Crown by Camomile Hixon, who also did the Neon Pink Hot Lips, seen below.

Neon Pink Hot Lips

They look quite like the Rocky Horror Picture Show lips, don’t cha think? Probably an influence.

Glitter Sandwich
Glitter Sandwich By Kimberly Genevieve at Artstar Dot Com

Mmm. . . delicious glitter.

Blue and Pink By Isabel Soto
Blue and Pink Hands By Isabel Soto

I am including the Blue Hand here, along with the Pink, because I appreciate its message!

Drip By Mara Minuzzo
Drip By Mara Minuzzo at Lustre Contemporary Dot Com of Canada

Because it’s almost Ice Cream Weather!

Strawberry Shortcake Pop By Daniel Jacob

Or how about cooling off with this Swarovski Crystal-encrusted cast of a Strawberry Shortcake Pop By Daniel Jacob at Axiom Contemporary, Santa Monica.

Serigraph Screen Printed Perspex Layers

OK, here is some amazing stuff: Serigraph Screen Printed Perspex Layers by Kate Banazi, who is represented by Gas Gallery (London). The  visible layers of vibrant color combinations really made us go a little crazy with desire for this art.

Serigraph Screen Printed Perspex Layers

Soooo beautiful!

18 Perspectives By Jose Margulis

The Neon Pink wall sculpture above, made of PVC and aluminum, is called 18 Perspectives by Jose Margulis, and it is available from  Ai Bo Gallery located in Purchase, New York.

Untitled Pink Pizza By Stefan Gross
Untitled (Pink Pizza) By Stefan Gross, at Chiefs and Spirits, Located in the The Hague, Netherlands

This is what happens to a pepperoni pizza when your college roommate abandons it on the rug for three weeks.

No 13 Fleur Dans La Vie

This old-school looking oil painting is just a detail from a piece called No 13 Fleur Dans La Vie which I saw in the booth for Genuine Global Company of Seoul, Korea. Sadly, I seem to have missed the artists name.

Rose is Back By Dganit Blechner

An iconic portrait of Audrey Hepburn from her role in Breakfast at Tiffany’s is appropriated and updated as Rose is Back by Israeli artist Dganit Blechner, found at Linda Blackstone Gallery, which is based in London.

Cornucopia By Jack Frame
Cornucopia By Jack Frame Cube Gallery, London

Do you like Trees? The Affordable Art Fair has Trees for you.

\Pink Sloe
Pink Sloe By Henrik Simonsen at Eyestorm Gallery, London

Hot Oak II By Emma Levine
Hot Oak II By Emma Levine at LCA (London Contemporary Art)

Martina By Olivier Duhamel

Do you like Nudes? Who doesn’t, right? Check out this unique piece: Martina by Olivier Duhamel, which we found at the booth for La Lanta Gallery in Bangkok. Despite appearances, this fine lady is not an example of 3D Printing, but rather it is hand-assembled Acrylic Slices. Here’s another view:

Martina By Olivier Duhamel

To say that Martina created a substantial buzz in the booth is an understatement!

151 Proof By Pasha Setrova

 151 Proof By Pasha Setrova at Arteria Gallery, Bromont, Canada.

Pink Torso By SangSik Hong

Pink Torso by SangSik Hong at Krause Gallery, NYC is made up of pale pink drinking straws cut to different length and hand assembled.

First Lady By Michael Wallner

First Lady By Michael Wallner at Will’s Art Warehouse, London.

Morning Smile Fuschia by Marie Noelle Royanette

Morning Smile Fushia by Marie Noelle Royanette at Paris-based Galerie Virginie Barrou Planquart.

The Illest Biggie Bust By Ryan Callanan

We’d like to give a special shout out to the friendly folks at Tag Fine Arts in London, who represent pop art sculptor Ryan Callanan, an artist whose work you will have seen on The ‘Gig previous to this post. Callanan’s  sculpture, The Illest  / Biggie Bust was available in an array of solid colors to suit your décor and taste.

The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour

This wall of Pink-hued light boxes were ‘lighting up’ the booth of Arteria Gallery, of Bromont, Canada. Specifically, we are interested in the very long boxon the far left. Let’s take a closer look.

Beatles Film Strips

As you can see, the box is made up of film negative strips from The Beatles’  Magical Mystery Tour, specifically from the clip for I Am The WalrusHugo Cantin is the artist.

Dream In Color Pool Installation By Richard Heeps

This is a photograph from the Dream In Color Pool Installation (2002) by Richard Heeps and we saw it at Bleach Box Photography GalleryLondon.

And that’s wrap! Thanks Affordable Art Fair — see you again in the fall!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Henri Rousseau, The Football Players

The Football Players
Photo By Gail

A toll clerk by profession, Henri Rousseau only began to paint seriously in his forties. Critics lambasted the untrained artist’s unsentimental images of faraway places (he never traveled outside of France), yet the Parisian avant-garde celebrated his unique style. Executed only two years before he died a pauper, The Football Players (1908) illustrates Rousseau’s quirky attempts to depict modern times with a new sport, rugby. The active, albeit stylized athletes present a rare exception from Rousseau’s largely static compositions.

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.

Modern Art Monday: Robert Delaunay, Window on the City No. 3

Window on the City No 3
Photo By Gail

Window on the City No 3 (1912) belongs to Robert Delaunay’s series City (La Ville, 1909-11) which helped establish his reputation as a leading avant-garde artist. The painting also marks a fundamental transition in the artist’s oeuvre: while in earlier paintings light was a device used to break up objects, in this work light becomes the subject itself. The patchwork texture, common to his paintings, is transformed into a consistent pattern of triangles and rectangles. A new range of brilliant colors explodes on the canvas surface. Interestingly, the reverse of this painting bears fragments of Carousel of Pigs (1906), which was once thought lost. This unfinished work is characteristic of Delaunay’s previous exploration of Neo-impressionism and includes renderings of people and flowers broken down into brilliant colors, reveling the different ways in which, in painting, light visually constructs all objects.

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Rudolf Bauer, Invention (Composition 31)

Invention (Composition 31)
Photo By Gail

By the late 1920s, Rudolf Bauer (1889 – 1953) had replaced the lively and organic symphony of shapes that he had developed in his earlier work with a more balanced aesthetic. Invention (Composition 31) (1933)  epitomizes this trend and features flat geometries tightly gravitating toward a dark center, a hazy black shape perhaps symbolizing the ultimate void. Also around this time, museum founder Solomon R. Guggenheim became acquainted with the artist through Bauer’s former companion, Hilla Rebay. Not only was Bauer’s work amassed in depth, but he also played an integral role as Guggenheim’s European agent in the first decade that Guggenheim spent forming his modern art collection.  Invention (Composition 31) was reproduced on the cover of the catalogue Art of Tomorrow, which accompanied the opening exhibition of the Guggenheim Museum’s Non-Objective Painting, New York in June 1939.

Installation View
Installation View

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Modern Art Monday: Kathe Burkhart, Prick, From the Liz Taylor Series (Suddenly Last Summer)

Prick
Photo By Gail

Kathe Burkhart’s Prick: From the Liz Taylor Series (Suddenly Last Summer) (1987) is based on a scene from the 1959 film Suddenly Last Summer, starring Elizabeth Taylor. The artist has amassed an extensive archive of film stills of Taylor, which she uses for an ongoing series based on the actress’s image — works she sees as self-portraits related to her own life through the choice of image and text. For Burkhart, Taylor represents an important and iconic early feminist:

Liz Taylor as an actress was often gender nonconforming, and unlike Marilyn Monroe, Judy Garland and other Hollywood victims, she survived.

Photographed as Part of Fast Forward: Painting From The 1980s at the Whitney Museum of Americana Art, on Exhibit Through May 14th, 2017.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Amedeo Modigliani, Jeanne Hébuterne with Yellow Sweater

Jeanne Hebuterne with Yellow Sweater
Photo By Gail

Amedeo Modigliani (1884 – 1920) met Jeanne Hébuterne in 1917, when she was 19 and a student in Paris. That same year, they moved into a studio and remained together until their deaths in 1920 (Hébuterne committed suicide the day after Modigliani died of tuberculosis). Hébuterne was the subject of more than 20 portraits that embody the artist’s signature depiction: a dramatically elongated figure with almond-shaped eyes and sensual but firmly closed lips. Hébuterne looks straight ahead, but her eyes are empty, as if caught in a reverie. African masks and early Sienese masters, as well as the concurrent styles of Constantin Brancusi and Pablo Picasso, influenced Modigliani’s work.

Jeanne Hébuterne with Yellow Sweater (1919) was photographed as part of the exhibit, Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in NYC.