Tag Archives: 23rd Street

Gotta Catch ’em All

23rd Street SubwayExit
Photo By Gail

Gotta Catch All The Trains!

Charlie Hewitt’s Urban Rattle Sculpture Near the High Line

Charlie Hewitt Urban Rattle Sculpture
Photos By Gail

I went walking on the High Line today and saw this fantastic modern abstract sculpture, which is just adjacent to the park, having been installed on the patio of  a luxury rental complex known as Ten23, located between 22nd & 23rd Street on Tenth Avenue. The 20-foot high sculpture is called Urban Rattle, and it’s by American artist Charlie Hewitt.

Urban Rattle

Mosaic Tile Hats of The Famous, 23rd Street N and R Subway Station

Subway Hats View
All Photos By Gail

As part of the MTA Arts & Design program (formerly known as MTA Arts for Transit), the platform walls at the Broadway and 23rd Street Subway stops for the N and R Trains are decorated with a seemingly endless row of colorful tile mosaics depicting a series of eclectic Hats previously worn on the heads many and varied famous people from times past. Here are few we photo-captured while out on an Urban Safari this last weekend!

Evelyn Nesbitt Actress

Evelyn Nesbitt, Artist’s Model, Actress, Chorus Girl

Samuel Clemens Mark Twain

Samuel Clemens (AKA Mark Twain), Author

Phineas T Barnum

Phineas T. Barnum, Museum Owner and Circus Entrepreneur

Charles Sherwood Stratton Tom Thumb

Charles Sherwood Stratton (AKA Tom Thumb), PT Barnum Performer

Ehrich Weiss Harry Houdini

Ehrich Weiss (AKA Harry Houdini), Magician

Isadora Duncan

Isadora Duncan, Dancer

Winslow Homer

Winslow Homer, Painter

Marie Curie

Marie Curie, Physicist

Robert Ross McBurney and Julia Ward Howe

Robert Ross McBurney, Founder of the YMCA, and Julia Ward Howe, Poet

23rd Street Signage View

23rd Street Signage

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

Will Ryman’s Bird at the Flatiron Plaza

Will Ryman Bird 1
Photos By Gail

Bird (2012), is a 12-foot high, 12-foot wide, and 14-foot long sculpture, made with fifty-five hundred actual and fabricated nails in the shape of a bird. The work weighs five tons, and rests upon a nest of ninety thousand nails. Through this sculpture, Ryman changes the meaning of the nail, which is traditionally used to connect materials and build structures. By dramatically altering its scale and using it in excessive quantities, Ryman blurs the relationship between abstraction and realism. As the viewer rotates around the sculpture, Bird transitions from the shape of a bird to a nonrepresentational sculpture.

Bird will be on Display through April 21st, 2013
Flatiron Plaza  Intersection of 23rd Street, 5th Avenue and Broadway,  New York

Will Ryman Bird 2

Will Wyman Bird Rear View

Tree With Heart Shaped Lights

Tree with Heart Shaped Lights

One evening earlier this year, Geoffrey and I were walking home from an art opening at Jonathan LeVine Gallery and I snapped a photo of this cool tree on 23rd Street just East of 10th Avenue. The lights are not really heart shaped, but it looks like they are. I like it.