Tag Archive | High Line

Art on The High Line: Jon Rafman, The Swallower Swallowed

Swallowed
All Photos By Gail

The videos and sculptures Jon Rafman (b. 1981)s are comprised of images constantly swallowing one another, much in the way that we consume media ourselves every day. In his commission for the High Line, Rafman presents a sculpture that takes the form of a circle of autophagous animals including a Dog, a Whale, a Lizard, possibly a Pig, and a Human all looped into a speculative food chain.

Jon Rafman’s The Swallower Swallowed is part of the Group Show Mutations, and it will be on view at the High Line Park, West of 10th Avenue right at 23rd Street, Through March of 2018.

Swallowed

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Sunbathers II On The High Line

Sunbathers Ice Cream Cone
All Photos By Gail

Kathryn Andrews appropriates images from popular culture, often American movies, television, and stock photography archives. She then alters and re-contextualizes these images into three-dimensional configurations to create new narratives where viewers are invited to rethink the photographs in relation to their own bodies.

Sunbathers

For her High Line Commission, Sunbathers I (not shown, located at 18th Street) and Sunbathers II (shown here), Andrews responds to two contrasting aspects of the elevated park: its relationship to nearby billboards and to the natural landscape. Andrews describes the High Line’s environment as a “hyper-surreal image world,” composed of large-scale advertisements and commercial signs that surround park visitors as they stroll high above the bustling cityscape.

Sunbathers II is a large, horizontal aluminum box containing a giant fan and featuring a photograph of an ice cream cone. The fan’s movement is juxtaposed with the adjacent static image, mirroring the park itself.

Kathryn Andrews’ Sunbathers I and II Will Be On Display Through March, 2017.

Sunbathers Distant View

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Sleepwalker on The High Line

Sleepwalker
All Photos By Gail

On my way to a Press Preview at the Whitney Museum last week, I decided to take the scenic route; walking along the High Line from 14th Street to Gansevoort Street. Because why not. As I hit the top of the stairs, I was met with this somewhat disquieting vision.

Sleepwalker From The Rear

Yes, creepy! Of course, after a split second, I realized that I was looking at a statue, and not some random bald guy clad only in tight whities, stalking unsuspecting nature lovers in sub-40 degree weather. As it turns out, I had come upon Tony Matelli’s Sleepwalker (2014), part of the Wanderlust series of public art installations along the west side’s elevated High Line Park. Very fun!

Sleepwalker Close Up

For Sleepwalker, Matelli presents a hyper-realistic painted bronze sculpture of a somnambulant man lost and adrift in the world, meandering about in a deep sleep. An amusing take on the theme of walking, Matelli’s sculpture challenges preconceived ideas about traditional monumental portraiture, and questions the extent to which any one of us is ever fully aware of our surrounding.

Sleepwalker Selfie
“Wait, Let Me Put My Hat On Him…”

And based on what I observed in the five or so minutes I was hanging out, the number of degrading selfies that this poor sculpture is likely subject to on a daily basis is certainly limitless. Oy.

Sleepwalker

Sleepwalker will be on display on the High Line at 14th Street until March 31, 2017.

Sleepwalker
Brains…”

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Let’s Go: A Summer Evening Walk on the High Line!

Path View Looking Uptown
All Photos By Gail

Hello, and welcome to our second installation of Let’s Go: a fun, informative and photo-heavy column in which I tell you Where To Go…in NYC, for summer sun and fun! This week, we are taking an early evening walk on the NYC High Line, a public park built on a historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. The High Line runs from Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District to West 34th Street, and snakes along between 10th and 12th Avenues.

Purple Fluffy Flowers

Geoffrey and I can often be seen travelling to and from the Chelsea Galleries via the High Line because, while it is usually way crowded at this time of year, it is still less congested than walking at street level, where you have to stop for traffic lights and look out for cars and idiots playing Pokemon Go.

This walk took place on a Saturday night in June, at around 7 PM. Please enjoy!

Purple Flowers

First of all, would not even believe the variety of gorgeous flowers, and flowering  trees and plants, that you will see sprouting up just everywhere. It is like a botanical garden of urban delights.

Fluffy White Flowering Tree

This tree looks like it has dandelion puffs all up in its branches. Dandelion Tree!

Pods

What kind of plant has pods like this? I want to know. To me they look like gnocchi.

Roof Tops with ESB

As I walk along, I enjoy taking artsy fartsy photos of the tops of buildings. You may recognize the tall silver one.

Window Spy Pic

It is cool to test the zoom capability of your camera’s lens by taking spy photos into the windows of luxury high rise buildings that border the path. Super fun.

HL 23 Building

This is an elevation shot of the HL 23 Building, which you can also see just left of center in this post’s top photo.

Zaha Hadid Building

This curved residential building — soon to be full of multi-million dollar condominiums — was designed by the late architect Zaha Hadid. You can read more about the building at This Link.

White Flowers and Track

I don’t know what these are, but they sure do smell good.

Yellow Flowers

You may feel like you are in the country, but you’re not. You’re in the jungle, baby!

Pig People Graffiti

Sometimes you can find interesting graffiti; sometimes, not so much. These little dudes that look like dancing bulls; I see them everywhere.

Graffiti Tags on Building

You can also see many different kinds of legitimate Public Art on, or from, the High Line, most of which was commissioned specifically for the park.

Long Purple Flowers and Buildings

Purple Daisies

If you walk all the way to the end of the High Line, close to Javits Center it is a good place to watch the sunset over the Hudson River.

Sunset on the High Line

This not the best photo of a sunset ever taken, but you get the idea.

Flowers Through The Cracks

While it is still summer, you should take a walk on the High Line.

Pink Fluffy Flower

Smart Tree By Nari Ward on The High Line

Smart Tree
All Photos By Gail

Nari Ward (b. 1963, Jamaica) creates sculptural installations from materials he collects in his neighborhoods, ranging from his original hometown in Jamaica, to Harlem, where he has lived since 1983. Ward’s compositions wrestle with memory and belonging, and address topics from justice to health care.

Smart Tree

For his High Line commission, the artist reconfigures a childhood memory. Returning to his father’s home in Jamaica after 15 years away, Ward remembers finding an abandoned car in the front yard, [which was] sprouting a lime tree.  He reimagines this story for the High Line with Smart Tree; the form of a Smart Car refinished with tire treads, propped up on cinder blocks, and sprouting an apple tree from its roof.

Smart Tree

With the car’s cinderblock base representing stasis, and its coating of tire treads suggesting perpetual movement, Smart Tree holds up a mirror to the flux surrounding the High Line itself and reminds viewers of the park’s history as a major transportation artery in Manhattan.

Smart Tree will be on view at the High Line Park Through March of 2017.

Charlie Hewitt’s Urban Rattle Sculpture Near the High Line

Charlie Hewitt Urban Rattle Sculpture
Photos By Gail

I went walking on the High Line today and saw this fantastic modern abstract sculpture, which is just adjacent to the park, having been installed on the patio of  a luxury rental complex known as Ten23, located between 22nd & 23rd Street on Tenth Avenue. The 20-foot high sculpture is called Urban Rattle, and it’s by American artist Charlie Hewitt.

Urban Rattle

Gilbert & George BillBoard at The High Line

Gilbert & George Highline Billboard
Photo By Gail

The newest commissioned artwork for the High Line Billboard just went up on September 3rd. This installation is a boldly-colored, stained glass-inspired Gilbert & George painting called Waking. The controversial art duo appear in the painting (from 1984) three times in the very center of the image and are surrounded on both sides by various male figures and faces. This photo was taken at approximately 7 PM, so you can see the sun is already starting to set, but this was the best I could do as I am not in this neighborhood very often. Gilbert & George: Waking will be up through October 1st, 2013 in a parking lot adjacent to the The High Line, at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue in Manhattan.