Tag Archive | High Line

Somos 11 Millones / We Are 11 Million On The High Line

We Are 11 Million
Photo By Gail

Andrea Bowers is a Los Angeles-based artist working in video, drawing, and installation that combines art and activism in order to draw attention to the struggle for social justice. For the High Line, Bowers presents a continuation of her ongoing work supporting the DREAMers, individuals who came to the United States at an early age without documentation, who have assimilated to U.S. culture, and who have been educated in the U.S. School system.

Bowers invited the immigration activist group Movimiento Cosecha to write a slogan in support of DREAMers, realized as a neon sign reading “Somos 11 Millones / We Are 11 Million,” which is the number of undocumented immigrants in the United States.

Part of the Agora Project, Installed on The High Line (Under the Standard Hotel) Through March of 2019.

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The Dig of No Body (Soil Sample) By Mariechen Danz, on The High Line

The Dig of No Body
All Photo By Gail

Mariechen Danz (b. 1980, Dublin, Ireland) is a Berlin-based artist who researches representations of the body, investigating the way it has been given meaning in various cultures, epochs, and fields of knowledge. In her installations, performances and music, often in collaboration with other artists and musicians, the human body emerges as a contradictory structure and a scene of conflict — an utterly contaminated zone, both politically and historically.

The Dig of No Body Detail
Torso Section, Detail

For the High Line, Danz presents a new iteration of The Dig of No Body, a sculpture that references anatomical learning models segregated into individual parts, like a life-sized soil sample in movable layers.

The Dig of No Body Detail
Arm Section, Detail

The work evokes our changing relationship to the earth, as well as the popular contemporary name “Anthropocene,” which suggests humans’ creation of a new geological era.

The Dig of No Body

The Dig of No Body is Part of the Group Exhibition Agora, On Display Along The High Line Through March of 2019.

Rabbit Tile Mosaic By Invader at The Standard Hotel, Meatpacking District

Invader Rabbit
Photos By Gail

Spotted this guy adjacent to the Skating Rink right outside the Standard Hotel on Washington Street in the Meatpacking District, NYC.

Invader Rabbit

Marguerite Humeau’s Sphinx Joachim On The High Line

Sphinx Joachim
All Photos By Gail

I haven’t walked much on the High Line this winter, and I specially try to stay away from it at night, when there could be hidden ice or slippery conditions, or when isolation could make for unsafe circumstances. But this past week I was at an opening on 28th Street and decided on the spur of the moment to just walk the few blocks along the elevated park until I reached 23rd Street and could walk down to a bus. What scary fun it was to come upon this sculpture waiting in the semi-darkness at 24th Street!

Sphinx Joachim

This imposing figure is called Sphinx Joachim, and he is creation of artist Marguerite Humeau (b. 1986, France). Humeau is fond of using her artworks to weave factual events into speculative narratives, enabling unknown, invisible, or extinct forms of life to erupt in grandiose splendor. For the High Line, Humeau has proposed a sphinx as a winged lion that protects the site against potential enemies. Equipped with motion detectors, Sphinx Joachim roars as an alarm every time it senses a human presence. Scary, especially in the dark!

Sphinx Joachim

Sphinx Joachim is part of the High Line’s Mutations series and will be on display through March, 2018.

95 Horatio Street By Do Ho Suh

95 Horatio Street Full Street
All Photos By Gail

If you stroll all the way to south end of the High Line to where the park terminates at Gansevoort Street in the meatpacking district, you may look across and consider that someone has blasted a passageway right through the building. But, that is an illusion.

95 Horatio Street

A new site-specific work by Korean artist Do Ho Suh (b. 1962) visually reconnects the building facade of 95 Horatio Street with the elevated railway that once occupied the neighborhood. Although today the High Line ends at Gansevoort Street, here Suh imagines what the vista might have looked like in the days when train tracks continued to run through buildings down into SoHo. 95 Horatio Street previously housed the Manhattan Refrigerator Company, which had a private siding for the railway, allowing direct access to St. John’s Terminal further downtown.

95 Horatio Street Close Up

The digitally rendered image, titled 95 Horatio Street, was just unveiled on June 26th, 2017, on the southwest corner of Gansevoort and Washington Streets. Suh is interested in the emotional and psychological significance of architectural space: its relation to personal memory and the collapse of time are themes he explores across media. His fabric recreations of former homes, meticulous rubbings of the interior of his New York apartment, and drawings of mobile and anthropomorphic architectural structures are evocative meditations on the definition of home, and how this definition is affected by displacement and context.

95 Horatio Street Detail

95 Horatio Street is the sixth work to be presented in this series of public art installations, organized by the Whitney Museum in partnership with TF Cornerstone and High Line Art.  This installation is organized by curatorial assistant Christie Mitchell.

Do Ho Suh: 95 Horatio Street will be on Exhibit For An As-Yet-Undetermined Period  of Time.

95 Horatio Street Perspective

Art On The High Line: Veit Laurent Kurz, Salamanderbrunnen

Salamanderbrunnen
All Photos By Gail

Veit Laurent Kurz (b. 1985 in Erbach, Germany) cultivates artificial ecosystems composed of a variety of living and nonliving materials, including plants, mosses, nondescript chemicals, biohazardous material containers, industrial plastic tubing, and paint.

Salamanderbrunnen

For the High Line’s Mutations series, Kurz created Salamanderbrunnen; a fountain that circulates Herba-4, Kurz’s imagined “herbal juice of the future,” asking us to imagine the new forms of nature that we create together.

Salamanderbrunnen

Salamanderbrunnen will be on Exhibit at the High Line, Closest to the Gansevoort Street Staircase, Through April 2018.

Salamanderbrunnen

Art on The High Line: Jon Rafman, The Swallower Swallowed

Swallowed
All Photos By Gail

The videos and sculptures Jon Rafman (b. 1981)s are comprised of images constantly swallowing one another, much in the way that we consume media ourselves every day. In his commission for the High Line, Rafman presents a sculpture that takes the form of a circle of autophagous animals including a Dog, a Whale, a Lizard, possibly a Pig, and a Human all looped into a speculative food chain.

Jon Rafman’s The Swallower Swallowed is part of the Group Show Mutations, and it will be on view at the High Line Park, West of 10th Avenue right at 23rd Street, Through March of 2018.

Swallowed