Tag Archive | Public Art

Cone Fixing Cylinder By Tom Otterness

Cone Fixing Cylander
Photos By Gail

Do these guys look familiar to you? If you’ve ever spent any time in the subway station at 14th Street and Eighth Avenue, you will recognize them as being creations of Tom Otterness, the artist behind the Life Underground installation found in that popular transit hub.

While an adjacent plaque identifies the artwork as Cone Fixing Cylinder (2014), and references its home as the Marlborough Gallery, located at 40 West 57th Street, 2nd Floor, the sculpture is actually tucked away in an access passageway between two adjacent buildings, connecting 57th Street with 56th Street just east of Sixth Avenue. The corridor is home to perhaps a half dozen other sculptures from various aritist. Check it out when you are in the neighborhood!

Cone Fixing Cylander
“Let Me Help You With That…”

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Final Week to See Jeff Koons’ Seated Ballerina in Rockefeller Center

Jeff Koons Seated Ballerina
All Photos By Gail

Jeff Koons‘ 45-foot tall inflatable nylon sculpture, Seated Ballerina, went up in Rockefeller Center Plaza on May 12th, 2017 and was originally due to be up only through June 2nd. But the sculpture’s tenure was extended by three weeks due to popular demand, which means you still have until this Friday, June 23rd, to make your pilgrimage to Midtown!

Seated Ballerina Right with People

Sunday was so very hot and summery here in the City, and I decided to train it uptown, where I visited a street fair, ate ice cream, and walked all around the Seated Ballerina sculpture, taking shots of her from every angle.

Seated Ballerina Distance With Prometheus

The famous golden statue of Prometheus is just in front of her.

Seated Ballerina Distance

And here’s a shot without Prometheus.

Seated Ballerina Left Close Up

I like that she’s up high enough that you can crop tourists out of your pics, or leave them in for life-size-scale comparison.

Seated Ballerina Left With People

Seated Ballerina

This one was taken with my iPhone as opposed to my regular camera. The difference in quality is amazing.

Seated Ballerina Skirt

Here’s a detailed look at the back of her skirt.

Seated Ballerina Through the Trees

Here she is as seen through the trees from across 50th street!

Seated Ballerina Left

Jeff Koons Seated Ballerina can be found in Rockefeller Center Plaza, bordered by Fifth Avenue to the East, Sixth Avenue to the West, 49th Street to the South and 50th Street to the North.

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Paparazzi Dogs By Gillie and Marc, Greenwich Village NYC

Paparazzi Dogs
All Photos By Gail

We were having a divine Italian lunch at Olio e Piu when I glanced out the window and spotted — on the tiny traffic island wedged between the cross streets of Sixth Avenue, Greenwich Avenue, and Christopher Street, which is formally known as Ruth E. Wittenberg Triangle — what looked liked a group of Dogs with Cameras (#dogswithcameras). Once we finished our delicious meal, we went outside to investigate. This is where we found the four Paparazzi Dogs.

Paparazzi Dogs with Jamie

The Paparazzi Dogs, by husband and wife team Gillie and Marc, have traveled from Australia to Greenwich Village, a place that hosts thousands of photo shoots each year. Gillie and Marc invite you to let the Paparazzi Dogs take your photo here, and become your own celebrity!

Mary and Jaimie and Paparazzi Dogs

Dog owners Jaimie and Mary show the Paparazzi Dogs some love!

Pap Dogs

The Paparazzi Dogs are brought to you by the NYC Department of Transportation and the Village Alliance. No Word on how long they’ll be on view so get your selfies now!

Paparrazi Dogs
Smile and Say Cheese!

Anish Kapoor’s Decension in Brooklyn Bridge Park

Whirlpool Detail
All Photos By Gail

Brooklyn Bridge Park is fun place to hang out on a sunny weekend day. Into early September, there’s another reason to make a destination of this small oasis that rests in the shadow on one of the city’s major landmarks: that being Anish Kapoor’s Descension whirlpool installation!

Decension Signage and Entrance

For more than 35 years, Anish Kapoor — an Indian artist who now lives in London — has been among the most creative artists of his generation. He has created compelling and poetic bodies of work using a range of materials that include raw pigment, stone, stainless steel, synthetic polymer, resin, and wax. He also has a longstanding interest in the sculptural potential of water.

Descension From a Distance

Descension Approach

Descension

Descension With Bridge

Decension, presented for the first time in the United States, represents a breakthrough with this inherently challenging, slippery substance. I visited the site on the (unfortunately overcast) Sunday of Memorial Day weekend, where I took a short video as I became hypnotized by the deep whooshing sound of the endless swirling water. Enjoy!


Like all of Kapoor’s works, Decension is the result of intensive research into material and process, exploring the potential of water to behave in surprising ways. The continuous swirling motion of this 26-foot-diameter liquid mass converges in a central vortex, as if rushing water is being sucked into the earth’s depths. We thus experience Kapoor’s abstract form on multiple levels. Its powerful physicality has a visceral and mesmerizing impact. Yet Descension also stimulates the imagination and suggests a social, cultural and even mythic dimension.

Decension

Descension is on view at Pier 1’s Bridge View Lawn until September 10th, 2017. Viewing times are 9:00 am-9:00 pm daily except during inclement weather.

Descension Close Up

Very Large Fish Lure on Water Street

Very Large Fish Lure
All Photos By Gail

I’ve posted many photos  and stories behind the fantastic public art that can be found in the Financial District, and here’s another piece I just discovered thanks to a tip on Instagram (thanks @fidi_living). Public spaces built by the Kaufman Organization are known for their quirky objects and splashes of color, and the plaza and arcade space at 200 Water Street, adjacent to Fulton Street to the northeast, is no exception.

Very Large Fish Lure
View Facing North

Completed in 1972, the Fulton Plaza, as it is officially known, maintains much of the original 1970s whimsy of the space, which  has recently undergone some renovations since the building it flanks was converted by a new owner from offices to residential dormitory use. Here you will find a Giant Fishing Lure (which, research reveals, once hung above  a pool of water). The Lure’s cascading hooks dangle ominously, ready to ensnare the next victim!

Very Large Fish Lure
View Facing West South Street Seaport

Entitled Very Large Fish Lure, the sculpture is credited to the Rebel Fishing Lure Co., with concept design by the late graphic designer Rudolph de Harak, a favorite of Kaufman’s, whose work was used at other company buildings.

 Merman’s Mermaid by Forrest Wilson
Merman’s Mermaid (1971) by Forrest Wilson

You can see that the plaza’s water theme continues in this fun mural, seen in the second photo of this post, which adorns a wall just north of the sculpture.

Very Large Fish Lure

Look out for those hooks!

Very Large Fish Lure

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Art on The High Line: Jon Rafman, The Swallower Swallowed

Swallowed
All Photos By Gail

The videos and sculptures Jon Rafman (b. 1981)s are comprised of images constantly swallowing one another, much in the way that we consume media ourselves every day. In his commission for the High Line, Rafman presents a sculpture that takes the form of a circle of autophagous animals including a Dog, a Whale, a Lizard, possibly a Pig, and a Human all looped into a speculative food chain.

Jon Rafman’s The Swallower Swallowed is part of the Group Show Mutations, and it will be on view at the High Line Park, West of 10th Avenue right at 23rd Street, Through March of 2018.

Swallowed

Sunbathers II On The High Line

Sunbathers Ice Cream Cone
All Photos By Gail

Kathryn Andrews appropriates images from popular culture, often American movies, television, and stock photography archives. She then alters and re-contextualizes these images into three-dimensional configurations to create new narratives where viewers are invited to rethink the photographs in relation to their own bodies.

Sunbathers

For her High Line Commission, Sunbathers I (not shown, located at 18th Street) and Sunbathers II (shown here), Andrews responds to two contrasting aspects of the elevated park: its relationship to nearby billboards and to the natural landscape. Andrews describes the High Line’s environment as a “hyper-surreal image world,” composed of large-scale advertisements and commercial signs that surround park visitors as they stroll high above the bustling cityscape.

Sunbathers II is a large, horizontal aluminum box containing a giant fan and featuring a photograph of an ice cream cone. The fan’s movement is juxtaposed with the adjacent static image, mirroring the park itself.

Kathryn Andrews’ Sunbathers I and II Will Be On Display Through March, 2017.

Sunbathers Distant View

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