Tag Archive | Public Art

Claes Oldenburg’s Monumental Paint Brush Sculpture in Downtown Philadelphia!

Claes Oldenburg Paint Torch Sculpture
All Photos By Gail

Philadelphia has no shortage of impressive public artworks and engaging street art scattered all over the city, and it’s fun to spend a day just wandering the different neighborhoods and checking it all out if you happen be visiting. Most notably, the city is also home to four large-scale public sculptures by legendary Pop artist Claes Oldenburg  — more than any other city in the world. I happened to walk by one of those iconic Oldenburg works — a 51-foot high Paint Brush sculpture entitled Paint Torch, and its accompanying 6-foot Red Paint Blob located just below it on the sidewalk — when was in Philly on a recent weekend. Paint Torch was installed on the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) Lenfest Plaza on August 20th, 2011.

Claes Oldenburg Paint Torch Sculpture

Paint Torch Can be Viewed Up Close at 118-128 N. Broad Street, just across the Street from the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia.

Claes Oldenburg Paint Torch Sculpture

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Armors Outdoor Art Installation On The Cloisters Lawn!

Armors Duo
All Photos By Gail

A couple of weeks ago, Geoffrey and I made the upper Mnahattan pilgrimage to The Cloisters to see the second half of The Met’s Heavenly Bodies costume exhibit, and we were not disappointed. A bonus of the trip is that, as we rode the bus from the subway up to the top of the hill – because who wants to walk in this heat? – I noticed what looked like life-size Knights in Armor scattered about the lawn, and decided that we must check that shit out on our way back to the train. And check it out we did.

Armors Wide Shot

It turns out that the Armored Knights, and their alien-looking, silvery Nude companions, part of an installation, Armors, which was created by Icelandic sculptor Steinunn Thorarinsdottir. Back home, the artist is known for the androgynous figures she’s placed at iconic landmarks across the globe, including in Reykjavík outside Hallgrímskirkja church and, back in 2011 at NYC’s Hammarskjöld Plaza near Second Avenue.

Armors

Armors is made up of three pairs of figures, each featuring a Knight — whose armor replicates a piece of 16th century armor found in gallery 317 at The Met – who is facing or interacting with one of Thorarinsdottir’s nude figures. The Knights were 3D scanned and then manufactured out of aluminum. Thorarinsdottir modeled each nude figure as a direct response to each distinct suit of armor, and all six were then brought to the Cloisters Lawn.

Armors Nude Figure

Knight and Cosplay Child
Knight Photographed with Random Cosplaying Child

In a statement about the work, Thorarinsdottir offers that, “Ancient armors are in themselves sculptural forms. They were developed for war but they give a sharp insight into the psyche of man. I wanted to merge medieval armors and ageless, androgynous figures in a way that would speak to the human condition today and in the past.”

Knight Close Up

Armors Distance Shot

Armors was created in collaboration with NYC Parks’ Art in the Parks program, and can be found in Fort Tryon Park, on the great lawn just downhill from the Cloisters. Get your medieval selfies through September 13th, 2018.

Knight and Nude Duo

Somos 11 Millones / We Are 11 Million On The High Line

We Are 11 Million
Photo By Gail

Andrea Bowers is a Los Angeles-based artist working in video, drawing, and installation that combines art and activism in order to draw attention to the struggle for social justice. For the High Line, Bowers presents a continuation of her ongoing work supporting the DREAMers, individuals who came to the United States at an early age without documentation, who have assimilated to U.S. culture, and who have been educated in the U.S. School system.

Bowers invited the immigration activist group Movimiento Cosecha to write a slogan in support of DREAMers, realized as a neon sign reading “Somos 11 Millones / We Are 11 Million,” which is the number of undocumented immigrants in the United States.

Part of the Agora Project, Installed on The High Line (Under the Standard Hotel) Through March of 2019.

The Dig of No Body (Soil Sample) By Mariechen Danz, on The High Line

The Dig of No Body
All Photo By Gail

Mariechen Danz (b. 1980, Dublin, Ireland) is a Berlin-based artist who researches representations of the body, investigating the way it has been given meaning in various cultures, epochs, and fields of knowledge. In her installations, performances and music, often in collaboration with other artists and musicians, the human body emerges as a contradictory structure and a scene of conflict — an utterly contaminated zone, both politically and historically.

The Dig of No Body Detail
Torso Section, Detail

For the High Line, Danz presents a new iteration of The Dig of No Body, a sculpture that references anatomical learning models segregated into individual parts, like a life-sized soil sample in movable layers.

The Dig of No Body Detail
Arm Section, Detail

The work evokes our changing relationship to the earth, as well as the popular contemporary name “Anthropocene,” which suggests humans’ creation of a new geological era.

The Dig of No Body

The Dig of No Body is Part of the Group Exhibition Agora, On Display Along The High Line Through March of 2019.

Monumental Sculptures By Tony Cragg on The Park Avenue Malls

Runner By Tony Cragg
All Photos By Gail

It’s not always easy to keep up with all of the Public Art installed in and around Manhattan at any given time, but I stumbled on the piece above, a towering, abstract white and cream fiberglass structure entitled Runner (2017), by sculptor Tony Cragg, when I visited the Park Avenue Armory for Nick Cave’s The Let Go installion. Runner is right out front of the Armory at the corner of 67th Street. When I left the Armory, I snapped a few additional shots of Runner before heading back down town.

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street

Runner is one of five monumental, abstract sculptures by Cragg, which present an opportunity for a leisurely stroll over nearly 20 blocks on this almost suburban Manhattan thoroughfare. The commanding sculptures exemplify Cragg’s experimentation with a variety of materials include the aforementioned fiberglass, stainless steel and bronze.

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street

Runner with the Park Avenue Armory in the Background.

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street

Runner (gebogen), 2017, Park Avenue at East 67th Street
Runner, Detail

On the 4th of July, I decided to get some exercise and walk from 52nd to 79th Streets to check out the other four Cragg sculptures. Please enjoy my photos!

Mean Average, 2013, Park Avenue at East 52nd Street

Mean Average, at 52nd Street, is a weighty composition made of bronze.

Mean Average, 2013, Park Avenue at East 52nd Street

I tried to shoot each of the sculptures from a variety of angles.

Mean Average, 2013, Park Avenue at East 52nd Street

You can get such a different impression of the work, depending on your perspective.

Elliptical Column, 2012, Park Avenue at East 57th Street

Elliptical Column at 57th Street is a nearly 20-foot tall spire made of shiny, almost liquid-like stainless steel.

Elliptical Column, 2012, Park Avenue at East 57th Street

Elliptical Column, 2012, Park Avenue at East 57th Street

Hammerhead, 2017, Park Avenue at East 72nd Street

The same white and cream fiberglass used for Runner is also used for Hammerhead at  72nd Street, and the brightness allows the sculpture to really pop against the surrounding landscape.

Hammerhead, 2017, Park Avenue at East 72nd Street

Hammerhead, 2017, Park Avenue at East 72nd Street

Tommy, 2013, Park Avenue at East 79th Street

At 79th Street, the artist uses bronze again for Tommy, which has a blue-green patina. The vertical forms seemingly defy gravity while giving the impression of upward motion and kinetic energy, though they are static.

Tommy, 2013, Park Avenue at East 79th Street

This exhibition is presented in association with the Fund for Park Avenue  and Marian Goodman Gallery.

Tony Cragg’s Monumental Sculptures will be on Exhibit along Manhattan’s Park Avenue Malls at the intersections of 52nd Street, 57th Street, 67th Street, 72nd Street, and 79th Streets Through October 31st, 2018.

Pink Thing of The Day: Giant Inflatable Pink Flower

Grown Up Flower Pink Close Up
All Photos By Gail

Grown Up Flowers is the name of a fun Public Art installation that you can see at several locations along Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Ave) in Midtown Manhattan. This Pink Flower, which is called Rose, lays prone in front of 1221 Sixth Avenue, and just a bit further on you can see her Orange friend, peeking out just a bit in the background.

Grown Up Flower Pink Long Shot

I found these guys by accident when I was heading to the train after checking out the Anselm Kiefer sculpture in Rockefeller Center, so it was a nice surprise!

A Sign in front of Rose provides a bit more back ground on the Grown Up Flowers Project. It Says:

Before it was Manhattan, the island was covered with wild and beautiful flowers. They’re still found in front of buildings, but they’ve never been able to complete with the scale of their surroundings, until now. Grown Up Flowers is a multi-site installation by Playlab, Inc. that imagines flowers inflated to many times their normal size, giving viewers a new perspective on these iconic and playful representations of beauty. Wander along Sixth Avenue to see these colorful flowers sitting, lounging, floating, standing tall, or even bending down to greet you.

Here is a map to all of their locations:

Grown Up Flowers Locations

The flowers are secured in place with cables and lit from the inside for nighttime viewing. Find out more about Grown Up Flowers at This Link.

Grown Up Flower Pink Close Up

Uptown Rocker By Lloyd Hamrol in Downtown Los Angeles

Uptown Rocker by Lloyd Hamrol in Downtown Los Angeles
All Photos By Gail

This past Christmastime, I traveled back home to California, where I spent many days of wild abandon exploring the southland like I had not since I was a resident, nearly 30 years ago. On a day spent scouring the many wonder-filled features of Downtown LA, I looked down from an overpass I was crossing on Grand Street and spotted this magnificent beast. The curved concrete sculpture features silhouettes of painted steel cars roller-coasting up the structure’s  curve.

Uptown Rocker by Lloyd Hamrol in Downtown Los Angeles

Part of the Bunker Hill public art project to beautify the Downtown LA area, this monumental piece is called Uptown Rocker by artist Lloyd Hamrol. While initially it appears that you its located on one of LA’s crazy freeways, the sculpture is actual;y located on the very busy Fourth Street. It might be fun to experience the sculpture while driving by,  but I think that where I was standing (officially the South Grand Avenue bridge crossing Fourth Street) is the ideal Uptown Rocker) viewing location.

Uptown Rocker by Lloyd Hamrol in Downtown Los Angeles