Tag Archive | Public Art

Derek Fordjourm, Half Mast

Half Mast Derek Fordjour
Photos By Gail

With Half Mast, Derek Fordjour debuts a new work that reflects on the current national reckoning with mass shootings, and the relentless threat of violence against Black and Brown bodies. A portrait of this divided moment in U.S. history, Half Mast presents law officers, students, and ordinary civilians in one compressed, shared space. Alongside teddy bears and balloons reminiscent of street-side memorials, some figures appear marked with targets while others have been reduced to silhouettes.

Fordjour’s image holds no one person or group responsible for the violence, even as it speaks to loss and abuse of power. Painted brightly in his signature graphic style, the work points to possibilities of a future civic movement or celebration. Derek Fordjour first made Half Mast as a painting; here, in his first solo museum exhibition, it is presented as a public art installation in the form of a large vinyl print, located outdoors at the intersection of Gansevoort and Washington Streets, across the street ands down one block from the Whitney Museum, and directly across from the end of the High Line.

Half Mast Derek Fordjour

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Mark Manders Tilted Head at Doris C. Freedman Plaza

Tilted Head Front View
All Photos By Gail

Mark Manders’ Tilted Head is a work of fiction. It has the appearance of unfired clay combined with everyday objects but in fact is made entirely of cast bronze. The cracks and fissures that cover its surface imply an organic process of drying and decay, yet its metal form is fixed.

Tilted Head 1

It might suggest an incomplete model, abandoned in the artist’s studio, if not for the fact that its colossal size and civic location lend it the air of a grand monument. Eyes shut, the androgynous figure’s mask-like features are at rest, undisturbed by an abrupt slice through a third of its face. The unfinished side of the head is held as if in a splint by wooden planks, one tied with rope.

Tilted Head Rear View

At the back, chairs and a suitcase, all slightly reduced in size, protrude from a mass of formless material. These shifts in scale, unexplained objects, and trompe l’oeil bronze effects alter our perception and spark the imagination.

Tilted Head Back Detail
Back of Sculpture, Detail

Mark Manders (b. 1968, The Netherlands) has been interested in the human figure throughout his career, and is particularly fascinated with the head, which he sometimes depicts detached from the body and juxtaposed with different elements. These heads are always stylized representations rather than individualized portraits.

Tilted Head Side View

His approach creates a paradoxical sense of both immediacy and timelessness, of something newly made with fresh clay yet belonging to the traditions of classical statuary. With Tilted Head, Manders has rendered a compelling fiction of human form that inhabits a poetic space between representation and abstraction, serenity and rupture, life and mortality.

Tilted Head Right Side View

Mark Manders’ Tilted Head is Curated by Public Art Fund Director & Chief Curator Nicholas Baume. It Will be on Display at the Doris C. Freedman Plaza, Fifth Avenue and 60th Street, Adjacent to Central Park, Through September 1st, 2019.

Push Pin Pumps By Laura Escamilla!

Push Pin Pumps
All Photos By Gail

Beautiful shoes can certainly be considered works of art, and in the case of these Hot Pink beauties created from ordinary push pins, that is exactly the case.

Push Pin Pumps

These striking Push Pin Shoes (1981), designed by Laura Escamilla, were part of a Public Art Installation called Obsessorize: Common Objects Uncommon Accessories, a joint venture between Madison Avenue Business Improvement District (BID) and students at the SVA 3D Design department.

Push Pin Pumps

These shoes were spotted somewhere along Madison Avenue in the upper 70s. The exhibit was co-sponsored by Marie Claire magazine.

Push Pin Pumps

Dorothy Iannone’s I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door On The High Line

I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door
All Photos By Gail

Dorothy Iannone is a Berlin-based artist whose works focus on eroticism and the female sexual experience. Inspired by Egyptian frescoes, Byzantine mosaics, and ancient fertility statues, Iannone depicts the act of lovemaking not as an act of taboo, but rather as an act of spiritual union and transcendence. While now commonly lauded as transgressive and radical, her work, which often portrays her love affair with the late artist Dieter Roth, has been subject to frequent censorship since the 1960s. Iannone and Roth began creating work side-by-side after Iannone moved to Europe in 1967, and the two artists influenced each other’s works greatly for almost a decade. Overlooked for much of her career, Iannone’s magnetic and highly influential work finally began to receive widespread recognition in the late 2000s.

For the High Line, Iannone created a new, large-scale mural installation featuring three colorful Statues of Liberty. Between them runs the words, “I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door,” which is the final line from Emma Lazarus’s poem The New Colossus, the ode to the freedom promised by immigration to America engraved on a bronze plaque mounted inside the statue at Liberty Island. Iannone’s piece was conceived before the recent months of upheaval in the United States around immigration, an already contested topic; these recent debates have raised the Statue of Liberty anew as a symbol of the openness of New York City and the United States to those seeking asylum, freedom, or simply a better life. Iannone’s vibrant Liberties bring a bit of joy to an often exhausting and demoralizing political debate.

Dorothy Iannone’s I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door Will Be On Display on the High Line at 22nd Street Through March 2019.

I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door Detail

Psychedelic Christmas Tree Forest at The Standard Hotel

Colored Christmas Trees
All Photos By Gail

If you happen to be planning an outing to the Whitney Museum to see the new Andy Warhol exhibit, From A to B And Back Again, why not make a day of it: do some shopping, walk the High Line, enjoy a delicious lunch at Bubby’s, and stop by the outdoor Plaza at the Standard Hotel to check out their amazing Psychedelic Christmas Tree Forest!

Colored Christmas Trees

Colored Christmas Trees

As you can see, these trees are decorated with oversize sweets such as  Gummy Bears, Candy Canes and Gum Drops! Fun!

Colored Christmas Trees

Colored Christmas Trees

While you stroll among the trees and take assloads of selfies for your Instagram feed, you can also enjoy a hot beverage!

Find This Forest of Colorful Holiday Trees at The Standard Hotel Plaza, Located at 848 Washington at 13th Street, New York 10014

Colored Christmas Trees

Monumental Dalmatian Statue at NYU Langone Health

Dalmatian with Cab Statue
All Photos By Gail

In New York City, you can discover something new and surprising every day! I was on my way to a party on East 34th Street near the FDR Drive when I found myself face to face with  a 38-foot-tall statue of a Dalmatian balancing a bright Yellow NYC Cab on her nose. Yes, I just typed that.

Spot From a Distance

The site-specific sculpture of a female Dalmatian puppy called Spot is the work of artist Donald Lipski.
Rising to the height of a three-story building, Spot serves as a lighthearted greeting for patients of the new Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone, which opened on June 24th, 2018.

Spot
Balancing Act

Spot was constructed with fiberglass and steel beams in a large factory in Wisconsin before she was trucked to the city, and brought in by crane to the 34th Street construction site. The taxi cab is a real Prius (sans motor) which was donated by Toyota. When it rains, its windshield wipers will activate.

Aerial View of Spot

Spot is the perfect playful figure to introduce adults and children to Hassenfeld,” NYU Langone said in a statement. “Spot contributes to the hospital’s uplifting atmosphere, part of our commitment to helping families feel welcome, supported and at ease from the moment they walk through the doors.

Spot Can Be ‘Spotted’ on the Strip of Lawn Just Out Front of Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital Entrance at NYU Langone Health,  Located at 424 East 34th Street (East of First Avenue), NYC.

Spot the Dalmatian

Tristan Eaton’s Intermission Mural at Houston and Bowery

Tristan Eaton Intermission Mural
All Photos By Gail

Tristan Eaton’s Intermission Mural up now at Bowery and Houston Street is one of the more colorful and accessible installations to take up the space at that revered corner in recent memory. The mural went up in June of 2018.

Tristan Eaton Intermission Mural

Geoffrey and I happened to walk by it on a very overcast day, but Eaton’s signature bright colors and pop art references made the day a little bit brighter.

Installed adjacent to the mural is a small black plaque where you can read these words about the artist:

Born in 1978, Triston Eaton spent his childhood moving from Los Angeles, London and Detroit to Brooklyn, where painting graffiti, skateboarding and comic books became his obsession.

Intermission

Eaton devoted his artistic career to spray paint after 15 years of experimentation with motorcycle painting, toy design, silk-screen work and graphic design.

Intermission Mural Detail

His diverse background informs his now iconic painting style. Eaton’s large scale mural work features a meticulous visual collage of pop imagery, all executed with freehand spray paint on a colossal scale to tell human stories through iconograpohy and metaphor.

Intermission Mural Detail

Eaton’s murals can be found in dozens of cities across the globe from Paris to Shanghai a well as the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection.

Street Art Map Detail

The above photo shows a detail of the mural where Eaton has drawn a rough map showing where you can find works by other prominent street artists in the surrounding neighborhood.

Intermission Mural Detail

Intermission Mural