Tag Archive | Ice Cream Cone

Sunbathers II On The High Line

Sunbathers Ice Cream Cone
All Photos By Gail

Kathryn Andrews appropriates images from popular culture, often American movies, television, and stock photography archives. She then alters and re-contextualizes these images into three-dimensional configurations to create new narratives where viewers are invited to rethink the photographs in relation to their own bodies.

Sunbathers

For her High Line Commission, Sunbathers I (not shown, located at 18th Street) and Sunbathers II (shown here), Andrews responds to two contrasting aspects of the elevated park: its relationship to nearby billboards and to the natural landscape. Andrews describes the High Line’s environment as a “hyper-surreal image world,” composed of large-scale advertisements and commercial signs that surround park visitors as they stroll high above the bustling cityscape.

Sunbathers II is a large, horizontal aluminum box containing a giant fan and featuring a photograph of an ice cream cone. The fan’s movement is juxtaposed with the adjacent static image, mirroring the park itself.

Kathryn Andrews’ Sunbathers I and II Will Be On Display Through March, 2017.

Sunbathers Distant View

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Video Clip of The Week: Dilly Dally, “Purple Rage”



Hey what’s up. Welcome to the first Video Clip of the Week for Fall, 2015, courtesy of the Canadian band, Dilly Dally! Aurally, Dilly Dally’s “Purple Rage” sounds like Maria McKee possessed by the spirit of Kathleen Hanna fronting The Pixies. What that means is that your ears are in for a blast of grunge-melodicism that is, in a word, irresistible. In the video, Dilly Dally lead vocalist, Katie Monks plays the challenging role of the embodiment of Rage, a popular and underrated emotion which takes the form of a Creature from the Purple Lagoon, or something. Purple Rage then wanders from the marshlands into the streets of downtown Toronto for a story line that is both surreal and totally familiar simultaneously. It is a lot of fun to watch, and the song is just fantastic!

“Purple Rage” is the second single from the band’s hotly anticipated debut album, Sore, due out October 9th, 2015 on Partisan Records. Enjoy!

Dilly Dally Purple Rage Ice Cream
Ouch

Fashionable Child’s Spring Outfit

Biggie Smalls T Shirt
Photo By Gail

We’re not feeling the spring weather quite yet, but once it warms up a bit, I think any hip five year old girl would love to rock this Biggie Smalls T-Shirt paired with a White Tulle Tutu and accessorized with a novelty Ice Cream Cone Pendent. I wish this outfit came in my size, is all I’m sayin’. Available at Piccolini NYC on Mott Street.

Modern Art Monday Presents: James Rosenquist, Volunteer

James Rosenquist Volunteer
Photo By Gail

Excerpted from a Textual Analysis by Frank D’Antonio:

James Rosenquist’s Volunteer is dated 1964, but, according to Rosenquist, [it was] finished shortly before the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

I think one of the coolest things about this painting is the use of fragmented symbols to depict the American life in the mid 20th century. The washing machine in the upper right speaks to a viewer as a symbol of American technological progress. The man in the business suit speaks as a symbol of how the American professional was dressing during this time. The ice cream speaks of American’s desire for “gustatory pleasure” (James Rosenquist. Volunteer. 1964. Art Institute of Chicago).

I like this painting because of how it can be interpreted in many different ways. My interpretation is that the artist is being cynical in this piece, depicting things that Americans were concerned with in the era of the mid 1960s. It is interesting to see how Rosenquist interpreted American culture at the time, symbolizing technological advancements, personal appearance, and personal pleasure being the main concerns of Americans at the time, concerns that are still on the top of the list amongst Americans.

The puzzle pieces with a piece missing are also an important aspect of the work. I found no insight into why they exist on the work, so I formed my own opinions. I believe that the missing puzzle piece is the artist separating himself from the mold of American culture he illustrates in this piece. He wants to break the mold as an artist and not fit in to the stereotype that he has depicted in Volunteer.

Many of Rosenquist’s other works have an underlying cynical message to them. Some depicted war machines, most often airplanes, representing his dislike for the war and global tension happening at that time. From my research, the most cynical and interesting part of the picture is Rosenquist’s image of his own palm which stands out past all of the other images. According the Rosenquist, the palm cynically represents “the hand that volunteers”. I see this being cynical, but at the same time pretty spot on. In my opinion, the artist volunteers his time to all who will view his work and will use it to interpret messages about their life and what they view important in it.

Rosenquist is telling us that modern technology, flashy self appearance, and delicious self indulgence are not bad things in and of themselves, but when put upon a pedestal and made the most important things in our lives, we lose grasp on the true meaning of life. We need to separate ourselves from the mold of society, the mold that tells us that bigger is better, only the good looking make it in life, etc, etc. We need to start living as human beings who help each other no matter what.

Volunteer By James Rosenquist is a very interesting piece of modern art, one that challenges us to use the painting as a mirror, and reflect upon ourselves when we look at it. Seeing how we fit the mold he has characterized, and how we can ultimately break out if it.

Frank D’Antonio

Photographed By Gail at the Museum of Modern Art in March of 2014 NYC while on loan from the Art Institute of Chicago.

Lori Larusso’s We’ll Be Happier Tomorrow at Porter Contemporary

We'll Be Happier Tomorrow By Lori Larusso

Porter Contemporary is currently hosting We’ll Be Happier Tomorrow,  the gallery’s first solo exhibition of new paintings by Lori Larusso — which I stopped by over the weekend and found to be completely charming.

Through shaped, acrylic panels depicting realist images of mundane objects, Larusso embarks / comments on the American Dream — and the idea of happiness being tied to external consequences — revealing symbolically and metaphorically the twist to having such an unrealistic outlook.

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I really loved the vibrant colors and playful presentation of this show, and how Larusso’s shaped paintings balance both painterly and sculptural effects. Dissections of reality and unreality sometimes are combined in multiple panels interacting with a central idea.

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By including only the necessary information needed to complete the idea and composition, aspects of a specific situation or environment are isolated and brought to the forefront through Larusso’s unique presentation.

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We’ll be Happier Tomorrow by Lori Larusso will be on Exhibit October 12th, 2013 at Porter Contemporary, Located at 548 West 28th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District. Gallery Hours Are Tuesday and Wednesday By Appointment, Thursday 11:00 AM – 8:00 PM and Friday – Saturday 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM.