Tag Archive | drummers

The 30 Richest Drummers in the World

Dave Grohl Lars Ulrich and Tre Cool
Dave Grohl, Lars Ulrich and Tre Cool Are Among the Richest Drummers in The World (Image Source)

Celebrity Net Worth, a website I had no idea even existed before this morning, has just published a fun list of the Thirty Richest Drummers in the World, and it’s just the kind of thing that makes me wish I were in a room full of drummers right now, so we could discuss it. First of all, the list is comprised of all Rock Drummers, which is amazing. Also, in addition to guys you’d expect to see on the list – such as Ringo Starr (at #1) and Charlie Watts (at #6, just below The Eagles’ Don Henley and Lars Ulrich of Metallica) there are couple of BIG surprises.

Danny Carey of Tool, a band that, while totally awesome, didn’t (as far as I know) really sell a lot of records, nor are they even still together as a band, comes in at #21 with an impressive $40 Million Net Worth. Danny Carey! I would guess that Danny not only invested well, but that he also makes a good chunk of change from his Drum Clinics and the instructional videos he makes. Another surprise is Steven Adler’s placing at #29, with $15 Million in assets. Woo! As the first person to be officially fired from Guns ‘N’ Roses, hilariously, for drug abuse, it’s heartening to learn that not only is Steven not destitute, but that he will surely be set for life as long as he doesn’t relapse. Yay, Steven! Here’s the full list:

The 30 Richest Drummers in the World
#1: Ringo Starr Net Worth – $300 Million (The Beatles)
#2: Phil Collins Net Worth – $250 Million (Solo, Genesis)
#3: Dave Grohl Net Worth – $225 Million (Nirvana, Foo Fighters)
#4: Don Henley Net Worth – $200 Million (The Eagles)
#5: Lars Ulrich Net Worth – $175 Million (Metallica)
#6: Charlie Watts Net Worth – $160 Million (The Rolling Stones)
#7: Larry Mullen Jr Net Worth – $150 Million (U2)
#8: Roger Taylor Net Worth – $105 Million (Queen)
#9: Joey Kramer Net Worth – $100 Million (Aerosmith)
#10: Chad Smith Net Worth – $90 Million (The Red Hot Chili Peppers)
#11: Travis Barker Net Worth – $85 Million (Blink 182, The Aquabats)
#12: Stewart Copeland Net Worth – $80 Million (The Police)
#13: Alex Van Halen Net Worth – $75 Million (Van Halen)
#14: Nick Mason Net Worth – $75 Million (Pink Floyd)
#15: Tommy Lee Net Worth – $70 Million (Motley Crue)
#16: Bill Ward Net Worth – $65 Million (Black Sabbath)
#17: Jon Fishman Net Worth – $60 Million (Phish)
#18: Carter Beauford Net Worth – $55 Million (Dave Matthews Band)
#19: Rick Allen Net Worth – $50 Million (Def Leppard)
#20: Tre Cool Net Worth – $45 Million (Green Day)
#21: Danny Carey Net Worth – $40 Million (Tool)
#22: Tico Torres Net Worth – $40 Million (Bon Jovi)
#23: Max Weinberg Net Worth – $35 Million (Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band, Conan O’Brien)
#24: Mickey Hart Net Worth – $30 Million (The Grateful Dead)
#25: Bill Kreutzmann Net Worth – $25 Million (The Grateful Dead)
#26: Neil Peart Net Worth – $22 Million (Rush)
#27: Taylor Hawkins Net Worth – $20 Million (Foo Fighters)
#28: Questlove Net Worth – $16 Million (The Roots, Jimmy Fallon)
#29: Steven Adler Net Worth – $15 Million (Guns N’ Roses)
#30: Mick Fleetwood Net Worth – $8.5 Million (Fleetwood Mac)

Happy Posthumous Birthday, Keith Moon


Goodnight, Moon (Image Source)

Who drummer Keith Moon was born on this day, August 23rd, in 1946. The photo above was taken on the occasion of Keith’s 21st Birthday in 1967. Legend has it that Moon’s birthday party celebration got wildly out of control and, in an trying to avoid the police, Keith climbed into a  Lincoln Continental Limousine (the exact car model is up for debate) and attempted to make a getaway. Unfortunately, in his intoxicated state he released the handbrake, and began rolling towards the pool. Moon simply sat back and waited, as the car crashed through the fence around the pool and into the water. RIP, Keith, you are still missed.

Happy Birthday, John Henry Bonham!


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Led Zeppelin Drummer John Bonham was born on this day, May 31st, in 1948. The music world still feels his loss.

Happy Birthday, Mel Gaynor!


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Simple Minds’ drummer Mel Gaynor was born on this day, May 29th, in 1959! Happy Birthday Mel, you are a bad ass on the kit!

Happy Birthday, Mike "The Sack" Fasano!

Gail and Mike F

Gail and Mike, Glam Slam Metal Jam, Summer of 2001, Good Times!

Please allow me to give a deserved  birthday shout out to  my very dear and much beloved friend, Mike “The Sack” Fasano, drummer extraordinaire and drum tech to the rock superstars of yesterday, today and tomorrow! Happy Birthday, Mikey!!

Gail In Print: Modern Drummer, November 2009

MD Nov 2009 Cover

The great Brann Dailor of Mastodon graces the cover of November’s Modern Drummer, where you will also find my long-awaited article on Nicko McBrain of Iron Maiden. Out to subscribers now, on newsstands everywhere October 6th!

Gail In Print, Modern Drummer August 2009

MD Cover August 09

When I am not blogging about Gay Ice Cream Trucks or Dead Rock Stars Birthdays, I am all about interviewing the Drummers. Because that is how I roll. In the August 2009 issue of Modern Drummer (Tre Cool of Green Day on the cover), you’ll find a lovely little chat I had with drummer Jeff Friedl of Ashes Divide and Puscifer. Jeff brings the radness home.

jeff friedl

An Interview with Travis Smith of Trivium

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When Florida’s premier Thrash/Metalcore band, Trivium, released The Crusade in 2006, drummer Travis Smith felt he’d “broken out of the box” – surpassing his previous recorded performances exponentially. With the release of the band’s fourth CD, Shogun, however, he thinks he may have “jumped the gun” with that claim. “That quote would apply 100 percent right now,” says the drummer. “This record really has the Travis Smith stamp on it. It shows my true identity behind the kit. I did some really cool stuff on Shogun that I’ve never done on any previous record; cool little tricks that you can’t plan. I was in the right headspace and the right environment, working with the right people. I felt good about going in there and laying down my drum tracks. Among our other records, this record totally stands out. Shogun will be the challenge for me to out-do myself for the next record.” Catch Travis and Trivium on tour now with Slipknot and Coheed & Cambria.

Metal Edge: The drums on Shogun sound great. Did you use any special studio micing?

Travis Smith: There were mics everywhere (laughs). I recorded drums in a 3,000 square foot room at The Sound Kitchen Studios in Nashville. Nick Raskulinecz, who produced the record, has interesting micing techniques. He had about seventy mics on the drums and ten room mics alone. We had two mics for every tom, top and bottom, three mics on the snare, and four mics in each kick drum. All the cymbals had their own mics. There were mics behind me and in the ceiling; you name the place and there was a mic. The drums are so full because he literally captured every sound.

Metal Edge: Do you have a favorite part of your kit?

Travis Smith: My favorite drum is always the snare drum. There’s something about the snare: I can tune them and they just make me smile. I guess it’s how loud they are; like a gun blast. When choosing snares I’m very picky about them and the way they’re tuned. I’m a drummer that tunes the snare differently in the studio than I do live. For Shogun, I tuned it a little lower than I usually do, so it’s got more body, which is what I was going for. So the main difference between my recording snares and my live snares is that I lose the body live and go for more ear-piercing attack. The snare drum [sound] on Shogun is way different than any snare drum that I’ve used on other recordings. I wanted it to have a punch and to rattle your speakers whenever I hit it!

Metal Edge: Did you record with the DW snare?

Travis Smith: For Shogun, I actually used a TAMA Bell Brass snare. Sometimes I try using different rims because often you can get different sounds just by swapping out the rim. I tried several different rims on the snare but I ended up using the factory rim that came with it, which is really fat and heavy duty. When it comes to my snare drum I’m a super heavy hitter. I hit the snare differently than I do any other drum and I have my own technique, which consists of [hitting] half rim and half head. It’s a technique that I’ve picked up over the years of playing so much and it’s what I think hitting the snare drum should sound like. I just detune the top head a little bit and wail the f*ck out of it (laughs).

Metal Edge: The Slipknot tour includes dates at huge places like Madison Square Garden. Have you yet played a venue of that size in the States?

Travis Smith: We haven’t done a tour like this in the States ever, and we are so looking forward to it. Growing up, you dream of playing [at MSG] and now we’re getting that opportunity to show people what Trivium is all about. That’s what we live for – to play live and be out there on that stage. We’ve played arenas with Slayer on the Unholy Alliance tour over in Europe, but now Slipknot is giving us that opportunity to really try to win over new fans here. We have a thirty-five minute set, which will be thirty-five minutes of complete chaos. We’re going out there to kill.

Travis’s Gear:
Drums: DW
Sizes: 8, 9, 10 and 12-inch Rack Toms, (2) 16×18-inch Floor Toms, 21-inch Gong Drum (used as additional Floor Tom), 7×14-inch Snare, 20×24-inch Kick
Cymbals: Sabian
Heads: Aquarian
Sticks: Ahead Travis Smith Signature Sticks

Official Website: https://www.trivium.org/

Travis Smith of Trivium

This article was originally written for Metal Edge Magazine as part of a monthly column by Gail Worley (under the pen name Jayne Rollins). With the magazines’ dissolution, the article has been added to the content base of The Worley Gig for our readers’ enjoyment.

An Interview with Jimmy DeGrasso of F5

metal edge logo

In a career spanning over twenty years, drummer Jimmy DeGrasso has toured and recorded with some of the biggest acts in classic hard rock and metal, including Ozzy, Megadeth, David Lee Roth and Alice Cooper. So when his former Megadeth rhythm section partner, David Ellefson needed a drummer to record the sophomore album by his band F5, DeGrasso was his only choice. While Jimmy lays down some brutal double bass on The Reckoning he resists being labeled a “metal drummer” and reveals that the direction of his career was somewhat of a lucky accident. “When I moved to LA twenty-five years ago I wanted to be a fusion jazz drummer,” Jimmy admits. “But when I got the gig doing sessions for Ozzy I thought, ‘Oh, cool! I’ll try that too!’ Suddenly I was pigeonholed as a rock drummer, then a metal drummer, a thrash drummer, and now I’m back to being a ‘classic rock’ guy. I always laugh because you know what? I’m a musician. I like to play different things and I just try to keep my options open.”

Metal Edge: Speaking about the evolution of your playing, one interviewer recently remarked that you’ve moved on to what he called “The Morgan Rose Style” of playing. What are your thoughts on that?

Jimmy DeGrasso: That’s cool, because Morgan is a great drummer and a nice guy. But the funny thing is, my work on The Reckoning is more reminiscent of the Suicidal Tendencies record I made in 1994. It was about me stepping back in time and taking the same approach I did then, because that’s what the music dictated. When I played with Megadeth there was really nothing reminiscent of Suicidal Tendencies, and when I play with Alice Cooper there’s nothing similar to either of those bands. And David Lee Roth, that’s a totally different approach. I just want to create the best track and the best song. If the song works, then my job is done.

Metal Edge: I like your tom patterns on “Love is Dead.” What exactly is going on between your toms and your double bass work?

Jimmy DeGrasso: Most of the fills on that particular song were what I call a press quad, which is almost like a triplet, because everything is a swing or a triplet pattern. Most of them are where your hands and your feet counter each other, where you play something with your hands and then match it with your feet and go back and forth – hands feet, hands feet, hands feet. So, it’s like a flam, and then a triplet on the left and right bass drum.

Metal Edge: You co-own and operate a drum shop, San Jose Pro Drums. Has selling many different manufacturers influenced the type of drums you want to play yourself?

Jimmy DeGrasso: Whether you get a DW, Pearl, Tama, Gretsch or whatever, most of the companies make a good quality product and drums do sound different. It’s like the difference between a Fender and a Gibson guitar. There are different tones and sonic qualities. It takes years to understand, but when you hear little nuances here and there, that’s what draws you to an instrument. I’ve been playing Pearl drums for years because they have the certain ring, tone and warmth that I like to hear in a drum. It’s a very balanced sound. I have a lot of different kits for different situations and I often record with a Pearl mahogany kit that I got ten years ago. Pearl is actually the only company that makes a mahogany shell. It’s not a real popular shell, but the people in the know have them because it’s such a good sounding drum.

Metal Edge: Your drums are very prominent in the mix on The Reckoning. Did you have any input on that?

Jimmy DeGrasso: Our producer Ryan Greene is also a drummer and that was all his doing. He mixed it how he thought it was appropriate, but with this type of music the drums are a prominent instrument. I’ve always been a bit put off when, considering the drums are your foundation, some producers tend to mix the drums way back and you can barely hear the toms. I don’t understand that. If you’re going to play it, you’d better be able hear it. I’ve done records where you hear the rough mixes at the end of the day and go, ‘wow this is killer!’ Then it gets mixed, remixed and mastered for radio where it’s all squashed together. The drums are very soft and compressed and you’re like, ‘Man, the rough mixes sound way better than the final mixes!’

Jimmy’s Gear:
Drums: Pearl
Sizes: (2) 18” x 22” Kick Drums, 10”, 12” and 13” Rack Toms, 14” and 16” Floor Toms, 14” x 5 ½” Jimmy DeGrasso Signature Brass Snare.
Cymbals: Sabian
Sticks: Promark Jimmy DeGrasso Model
Heads: Evans

Jimmy DeGrasso

This article was originally written for Metal Edge Magazine as part of a monthly column by Gail Worley (under the pen name Jayne Rollins). With the magazines’ dissolution, the article has been added to the content base of The Worley Gig for our readers’ enjoyment.

Gail in Print: Modern Drummer, January 2009 Issue

The highly innovative Gavin Harrison of hallucination-inducing Prog Rockers Porcupine Tree is on the cover story of the January 2009 issue of Modern Drummer magazine. Inside you’ll also find my brain-dazzling updates on Pat Wilson of Weezer and Sean Davidson of LA metal band, Black List Union.