Tag Archive | KFC

Cey Adams’ Trusted Brands at Rush Arts Gallery

Hot Wheels
All Photos By Gail

Cey Adams, a New York City native, is an icon of Hip Hop and graphic design. Trusted Brands is an exhibition of his new collage works on canvas examining branding in contemporary culture. Adams‘ use of collage and design principles creates rich textures of easily recognizable logos structured along subtle grids, which are becoming comparable to his signature. Adams’ delicate technique and balanced compositions celebrate the history of graffiti, graphic design, Pop Art and Hip Hop.

Coca Cola

Trusted Brands explores icons of brands that have impacted his thinking and ideology from youth. Adams emerged from the downtown graffiti movement and exhibited alongside fellow artists Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring. He appeared in the historic 1982 PBS documentary Style Wars that tracks subway graffiti in New York. He was the Creative Director of Russell SimmonsDef Jam Recordings and co-founded the Drawing Board an in-house visual design firm. He created visual identities, album covers, logos, and the differences here of advertising campaigns for Run DMC, Beastie Boys, LL Cool J, Public Enemy, Notorious B.I.G., Jay-Z and many others.

Union 76

Shell

Cey draws inspiration from 60’s pop art, sign painting, comic books, and popular culture. His work focuses on themes including pop culture, race and gender relations, cultural and community issues. Trusted Brands transforms images and graphics that he grew up with. “These are all brands that my parents trusted and then I ended up trusting. I wanted to do something that really kind of revisits that.”

Pepsi Cap N Crunch

Trusted Brands by Cey Adams will be on Exhibit only through March 28th, 2015 at Rush Arts Gallery, Located at 526 W26th St Suite 311, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Kool Aid and KFC

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Random Thoughts on KFC’s Double Down Chicken Sandwich

Is It Wrong That I Want To Eat This Thing? It Looks So…Tasty

I know I’m late to the party blogging about something made with fried chicken, bacon and cheese, but I think I figured out why KFC has begun to make what is essentially a Redneck version of  Chicken Cordon Bleu. KFC does not actually expect the vast majority of people (or dogs for that matter) to eat this thing. In fact, I would imagine that they do not anticipate much in the way of direct profits. I think they did this to skew our sense of what is acceptable to eat.

If I am a fatty (I said “if”! Yay for Internet anonymity!), or even just an occasional fast food consumer, now I can pull up to KFC and order more liberally without the guilt. Whereas before I would have felt like a monster for ordering a Famous Bowl, a large Coke, a biscuit, and a chocolate lava cake, that now seems sensible compared to the Double Down. So, my $10 worth of artery-clogging junk food which makes my left arm hurt to look at has now been normalized.

Genius.