Tag Archives: NYHS

Eye On Design: Workbox School Desk

Workbox School Desk
All Photos By Gail

A proposed remedy for problems faced by crowded New York City classrooms, the Workbox (2000) is a collapsible elementary school desk featuring a side blackboard for sanctioned graffiti and a private locker to stow clothes, preventing the spread of lice.

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Eye On Design: Tiffany Turtleback Lantern

Tiffany Turtleback Lantern
All Photos By Gail

Tiffany artisans made the irregularly surfaced Turtlebacks, a Tiffany Studio invention, by pressing glass into molds.

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Stewart Studio Graffiti Door

Stewart Studio Graffiti Door
All Photos By Gail

Vision or vandalism? New Yorkers had different reactions to the “tags” scrawled on subway trains in the 1970s. Many saw them as a sign of urban blight. Artist and photographer Jack Stewart saw them as a new American Art Form.

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Eye On Design: Million Dollar Sandals By Stuart Weitzman

Million Dollar Sandals
Photos By Gail

What we now refer to as the Red Carpet debuted at the 1922 premiere of Robin Hood, starring Douglas Fairbanks, the “First King of Hollywood.” Today, the pre-show parade of stars outside the Academy Awards is arguably as important to the fashion industry as the ceremony itself is to film. For the 2002 Oscars, actress Laura Elena Harring (Mulholland Drive) wore a pair of Stuart Weitzman stilettos ornamented with 464 Kwiat diamonds. While the shoes shown here are a 2012 reproduction, the original Million Dollar Sandals inspired the installation of a shoe-level camera on the red carpet, shifting fashion’s gaze decidedly footward. The designer also issued the famous shoes with a more affordable Swarovski crystals option.

Photographed as Part of Walk This Way: Footwear from the Stuart Weitzman Collection of Historic Shoes, on Exhibit Through October 8th, 2018, at the New York Historical Society, Located at 77th Street and CPW in NYC.

Million Dollar Sandals

Eye On Design: Tiffany Wisteria Lamps Designed by Clara Driscoll

Tiffany Wisteria Lamps
Photo By Gail

One of Tiffany Studios‘ most popular models, the Wisteria, was priced as $400 in 1906, placing it among the firm’s most costly lamps. The glass selection for the two lamps (both circa 1901) seen in the above photo created two dramatically different interpretations of the same design. One has a refined color palette ranging from pale blue to azure and cobalt, while the other displays bold contrasts of blue and white clusters.

Wisteria abounded in LC Tiffany’s leaded glass windows and on the grounds of his country estate, Laurelton Hall, and although the vine was a Tiffany favorite, Clara Driscoll’s correspondence identifies her as the designer of the iconic Wisteria lamp, which is composed of nearly 2,000 tiny pieces of glass. Designs for the Trumpet Creeper, Grape, and Apple Blossom, each sold with the same treelike base, followed shortly after the Wisteria.

Photographed in the New York Historical Society on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.