Tag Archive | Lamps

Eye On Design: Pillola Lamps By C. Emanuele Ponzio

Pillola Lamps at Cooper Hewitt
All Photos By Gail

In the 1960s, youth culture asserted itself, changing society’s rhythms of mass production and consumption, and generating a sense of upheaval and freedom. The Pop Art movement emerged, taking inspiration from mass media and the everyday. Bold colors, new material and radical forms characterized the work of artists and designers whose appropriation of the ordinary made brash or ironic statements.

Pillola Lamps at Cooper Hewitt
Note: Tongue Chair in the Background

Italy’s anti-design movement of the mid-1960s and 1970s is fully expressed in the tongue-in-cheek spirit of the Pillola Lamps (1968, designed by C. Emanuele Ponzio, b, 1923). Challenging notices of “good design,” the anti-design movement took its visual cues from pop art’s use of bold colors and banal subject matter. Conceived as a group, the lamps look like oversized pills poured from a giant medicine bottle.

Pillola Lamps at MOMA
Illuminated Pillola Lamps Photographed at MOMA. Non-Illuminated Lamps Photographed at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass at the Queens Museum

Tiffany Assorted Lamps
All Photos By Gail

When you visit the Queens Museum to see the Ramones exhibit, make sure you also stop in to see the Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, which is an on-going, and incredibly visually stunning, not to mention (but you can see I am about to) very educational exhibit of the art glass of Louis C. Tiffany! Did you know that his first name is pronounced Louie, and not Louis? I had no idea, but now I know!

Founded by early Tiffany collectors Egon and Hildegard Neustadt, The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass is a private foundation based in Queens. Since 1995 the foundation has partnered with the Queens Museum to exhibit and present its collection of Tiffany lamps, windows, metalwork, and ephemera, as well as an immense one-of-a-kind archive of Tiffany flat and pressed-glass “jewels” leftover from Tiffany’s nearby Corona, Queens studios, which closed in the late 1930s.

Row of Table Lamps

Before you even start looking at the lamps, check out the way this gallery is designed, where the shadows on the wall that are not those actually thrown by light bending around objects, but rather are painted right on the walls. It is so well done, it may even take you some time to  notice.

Pond Lily Library Lamp
Pond Lily Library Lamp

The Neustadt Collection Gallery has now relocated to the new wing of the Queens Museum, and the collection currently on display is the inaugural exhibition, Shade Garden: Floral Lamps from the Tiffany Studios, as well as a permanent display of other Tiffany designs. This is the best collection of Tiffany glass that I have seen anywhere, outside of the Morse Museum in Winter Park, Florida (which I highly recommend).

Pond Lily Library Lamp Shade Detail
Pond Lily Library Lamp Shade Detail

Shade Garden features 20 lamps exploring Tiffany’s masterful translation of nature into glass. Lamps of all shapes and sizes reveal the extraordinary artistry required to accurately portray complicated blossom shapes and the unruly growth patterns of flowers as well as their nuances of color and texture. Lampshades adorned with profusions of wisteria, peonies, pond lilies, and poppies — some of the most beloved and iconic Tiffany motifs — are included in Shade Garden, which will be on view for two years.

Peacock Lamp
Peacock Lamp, and Shade Detail Below

Peacock Lamp Shade Detail

Dragonfly Shade Detail
Dragonfly Shade Detail

Grapes Shade Detail
Grapes Shade Detail

Supplementing Shade Garden is an educational model demonstrating the labor-intensive process of making a leaded-glass lampshade. It includes original Tiffany Studios, as well as a large photomural of the Tiffany Shade Department, and an extensive selection of original Tiffany sheet glass. A film capturing the process of selecting, cutting and soldering the individual pieces of glass in the lampshade also accompanies the model.

Turtleback Reading Lamp
Turtleback Reading Lamp

Tiffany Globe Lamp
Tiffany Floral Globe Lamp (Also Seen Below)

Tiffany Trio of LampsTiffany Hanging Grape Shades

The Neustadt Tiffany Glass Collection a must-see attraction at the Queens Museum, even if you visit after The Ramones Exhibit closes on July 31, 2016.

Orchid Chandelier

Orchid Chandelier
Photo By Gail

I spotted this ornate chandelier in a restaurant called Santina, which is on Washington Street underneath the Highline, just half a block uptown from The Whitney Museum on Gansevoort Street. It looks pretty fancy with all of these nice chandeliers installed. I would eat there.

Santina Signage



Moss Lamp

Moss Lamp
All Photos By Gail

This Moss Lamp (1999) exemplifies designer Gaetano Pesce’s use of industrial production techniques and materials to produce unique objects. Here, he pours silicone in thread-like trails to achieve a textured and translucent sphere that casts a soft glow through irregular gaps and varied thicknesses. The end result is dictated by the behavior of the material.

Moss Lamp Display

Pendant Lighting from Upcycled Plastic Soda Bottles

Recycled Plastic Bottle Pendent Lamps
All Photos By Gail

I found this innovative and gorgeous Pendant Lighting in the gallery / event space of Repoproom in the Chelsea Gallery District. It was my friend Anne who realized the globes are constructed from clusters from upcycled 2 Liter plastic Soda Bottles! What a great recycling idea!

Recycled Plastic Bottle Pendent Lamp Close Up
Globe Detail

I’m not sure how these lamps were made but I’d bet you could do a little Googling and find step-by-step DIY instructions for a similar project. Because, the Internets.

Recycled Plastic Bottle Lamps

Rock Crystal Lamps that Look Like Skyscrapers

Rock Crystal Lamps
Photographed by Gail in AMNH Gift Shop

The Manhattan Skyline should be so gorgeous, amiright? You can buy these lamps in the gift shop at the Museum of Natural History on the Upper West Side!

Clive Murphy’s Post Neo Proto Demo

Clive Murphy New Geometry
All Photos By Gail (Click on Any Image to Enlarge)

Clive Murphys’s Post Neo Proto Demo exhibit is one that Geoffrey and I literally stumbled onto while in the same West 26th Street building for an entirely different exhibit. But I was immediately drawn into the Magnan Metz Gallery’s street level space because I cannot resist an exhibit that mixes Contemporary art with Modern Furniture Design. So, yeah.

Clive Murphy Plant

Post Neo Proto Demo, Murphy’s third solo show at the gallery, “comments on how ones living space is a representation of a created personal philosophy” – that is certainly true in my apartment! – exploring the relationship between the radical and the domestic.

TV Antennas

Taking the legacy of Modernism and the avant-garde as its point of departure, Murphy deconstructs and reassembles, delicately blending the familiar with uncanny, the purposeful with the dysfunctional.

Clive Murphy Green Floor Lamp

The exhibition includes altered domestic tableaus comprised of sculpture made with modified domestic materials. The result allows the viewer to participate in Murphy’s inversion of the classic furniture showroom by blending the purposeful with dysfunctional.

Clive Murphy Material World

In addition, new works drawn and spray painted on pages from iconic furnishing catalogs mirror the arranged living space tableaus with a tongue-in-cheek disruption of idealized domesticity.

Clive Murphy Tabletop Sculpture

I wish that some of these items were for sale at IKEA, because I would totally love to see them in my apartment. At any rate, I left with few inspired new design ideas of my own.

Clive Murphy Asian Lamp Sculpture

Clive Murphy’s Post Neo Proto Demo Will be on Exhibit Through April 12th, 2014 at Mangan Metz Gallery, Located at 521 West 26th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Clive Murphy Post Neo Proto Demo