Tag Archive | Eye on Design

Eye On Design: Bejeweled Armoured Yashmak By Shaun Leane for Alexander McQueen

Yashmak Bodysuit
All Photos By Gail

“You find beauty in the ugliest places,” maverick fashion designer Alexander McQueen assured jeweler Shaun Leane. Modern jewelry does not always aim to flatter. Some of the most spectacular examples assert mastery over the female body. This is jewelry on the edge; designed to push the limits of glamour, courting danger and even pain.

Yashmak Head Detail

The Yashmak is a veil concealing all of the face except the eyes, which is worn by some Muslim women in public. This metal Yashmak is part of a collection of jewelry that was designed for Alexander McQueen by Leane, who was not only a collaborator of McQueen’s, buts also a good friend.

Yashmak Edge Detail

Considered to be one of the top twenty most spectacular pieces in McQueen’s oeuvre, the Yashmak is created from aluminum plates cast from molds. The plates are linked by chains and inset at the center with red, Cabochon Swarovski crystals. Designed for McQueen’s Spring/Summer 2000 collection, which initially explored the clashing of Middle Eastern and Western cultures, the Yashmak  acted as a symbol of Middle Eastern dress.

Photographed as Part of  Jewelry: The Body Transformed, on Exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC from November 12th, 2018 Through February 24th, 2019.

McQueen Metal Bodysuit

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Eye On Design: Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne

Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne
All Photos By Gail

The Spring 2018 exhibition from The Met’s Costume Institute, entitled Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, ended its five-month run on October 8th, and broke all kinds attendance records, surpassing even that of 2011’s Alexander McQueen exhibition.  Over these past few months, I’ve enjoyed bringing you design posts featuring some of my favorite highlights from the exhibit, seen at both its Met Fifth Avenue and Met Cloisters locations. I still have many photos that have not been publicshed, so I may be bringing you #MetHeavenlyBodies designs well into 2019! You’re welcome!

Wedding Ensemble Right Side

One of my vary favorite outfits, photographed over at the Met Cloisters is this Thom Browne-designed Wedding Ensemble with its cloud-like skirt, from his Spring/Summer 2018 collection. Created from a variety of materials including white mink, white silk organza, ribbons of white nylon tulle, embroidered white silk thread, gold bullion, pearls, crystals, clear glass, and mother-of-pearl, it was quite the show stopper!

Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne

It’s no accident that this piece was installed near the museum’s famous Unicorn tapestries, as you can see in the above photo where a Unicorn Head and Horn are formed with twisted tulle and gold bullion on the garment’s bodice.

Wedding Ensemble
Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne with Unicorn Tapestries In Background

Wedding Ensemble Rear View Detail

And on the back, yes, there they are, the subtle stab wounds that we see in the tapestries.

Wedding Ensemble By Thom Browne

What may be even more striking than this ornate dress is the mannequin’s vibrant red hairpiece by celebrated hair stylist and wig-maker Shay Ashual, who designed all of the wigs for the exhibit. To quote Catherine Addington for Weekly Standard Dot Com, “In Ashual’s most stunning work, red-violet streaks matted to the face of the mannequin wearing a Thom Browne wedding dress conjure blood and beauty at once. Set against The Unicorn in Captivity, a tapestry that has often been interpreted as Passion symbolism, the hairpiece turns an otherwise enigmatic ensemble into the heavenly wedding garment of a martyr.”

Wedding Ensemble

Eye On Design: Scented 3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes
All Photos By Gail

Inside this glass dome are vessels printed from sugar. The dome has an indented opening, inviting museum visitors to take a whiff of the objects inside; and yes, they smelled like Cotton Candy.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

These pieces were designed by architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello in Oakland, California. The team use 3D printing processes to invent forms with unique tactile qualities.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The two pink candy dishes have rough, grainy surfaces. The first dish resembles a stack of bubbles. At the top, half of one bubble serves as a lid.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The second is a footed, rimmed bowl with a cone-shaped lid, which sits displayed separate from its base.

Photographed as Part of the Emerging Objects Exhibit at The Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

Eye On Design: Furniture By Marc Camille Chaimowicz

Room By Marc Camille Chaimowicz
All Photos By Gail

Marc Camille Chaimowicz (b. 1947) is a London-based, cross-disciplinary contemporary artist whose works challenge the categorical divisions between art and design. His recent career retrospect at the Jewish Museum (which was the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in the United States) transformed the entire second floor of the former Warburg family mansion from an exhibit showcase into a series of fantasy tableaus pristinely curated with unique and whimsical home furnishings and décor. This room was my favorite. Let’s take a closer look at the pieces that make up this dream-like living room set.

Give and Take Sofa and Rope Vase

Blue Velvet Give and Take Sofa and Pink Glazed Ceramic Rope Vase.

Maquette for Give and Take Sofa

Maquette for Give and Take Sofa

Stainless Steel Magazine Rack

Stainless Steel Magazine Rack with Diamonds Cut Outs

Pink Rope Vase

Rope Vase

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Your Place or Mine, at the Jewish Museum.

Room 2

Items Shown Left to Right : One Meter Lamp (2016), Glazed Ceramic Rope Vase (2014) Give and Take Velvet Sofa (1994) Stainless Steel Magazine Rack (2014)

Eye On Design: Eatwell Assistive Tableware By Shao Yao

Red and Yellow Bowls
All Photos by Gail

Color plays a powerful role in Eatwell Assistive Tableware (2015). Designer She Yao’s grandmother lived with Alzheimer’s disease. Her cognitive and sensory impairments caused her to eat less that she should. The Eatwell bowl uses the color blue, which does not appear in food, helping people with Alzheimer’s to distinguish food from the dish.

Yellow Place Setting

On the exteriors of the bowls, the colors red and yellow stimulate appetite. All pieces stand out from the table setting to enhance cognition.

Red Bowl

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: Book Covers By Elaine Lustig Cohen

Trio of Book Covers
All Photos By Gail

Over six decades, Elaine Lustig Cohen (19272016) moved among diverse activities, including art, design, and rare-book dealing. She began her career as a graphic designer in the mid-1950s, extending the vocabulary of European Modernism — Constructivism, Dada, and the Bauhaus —  into an American context for publishers, architects and cultural Institutions.

From 1962 to 1967, she helped shape the Jewish Museum’s intuitional identity, directing the design of catalogues, posters, booklets and other printed material for its progressive exhibition program. At the same time, Lustig Cohen developed a hard-edge style as a painter, with a formal language of solid colors, abstract geometric shapes, and minimally visible brushstrokes, her paintings directly relate to her design work and to the movement called Postpainterly Abstraction. Lustig Cohen’s artistic contributions demonstrate that the lineage of Postpainterly Abstraction should been expanded beyond the fine arts to include postwar graphic design.

Three Book Covers

One of Lustig Cohen’s key projects was the design of book jackets for Meridian Publishers. Drawing on her knowledge modern typography and avant-garde design principles, such as asymmetrical composition dramatic scale, and image montage, Lustig Cohen forged a distinctive graphic voice.

Three Book Jackets

For book jackets, she described her process as one of distillation, in which she would identify the central ideas of the text and render then abstractly with bold lettering, expressive forms, and playfully collaged photographic elements.

Photographed in the Jewish Museum in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: Crown of Thorns Headpiece By Alexander McQueen

Crown of Thorns Headpiece
All Photos By Gail

Alexander McQueen collaborated with the jeweler Shaun Leane to create this silver Crown of Thorns Headpiece (1996 – 97) formed from three intertwined briars. The piece was featured in McQueen’s Autumn/Winter 1996-97 collection entitled Dante, after the medieval Italian poet whose Divine Comedy portrayed an allegorical vision of the afterlife.

Crown of Thorns Headpiece

Photographed at the Cloisters as Part of the Exhibit, Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, On View Through October 8th, 2018 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (at both the Fifth Avenue and Cloisters Locations) in NYC.

Crown of Thorns Headpiece

Note: As of 11/5/18 This Piece is Now On Exhibit at The Met Fifth Avenue as Part of the Exhibit Jewelry: The Body Transformed

Crown Of Thorns