Tag Archive | eye on design

Eye On Design: Steuben Glass Vase By Frederick Carder

steuben glass vase photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

This striking, six-pronged Green Glass Vase (circa 1931) is part of a small group of modernist art glass by Frederick Carder for the Steuben Division of Corning Glass Works. Carder was a glass blower, born and trained in England. He preferred traditional forms and elaborate ornament, but like many of his contemporaries active in the late 1920s, he responded to the international interest in abstraction and avant-garde experimentation by incorporating sharp angles, asymmetry, and bright color combinations into some of his designs.

steuben glass vase photo by gail worley
Installation View

Photographed in the Art Institute, Chicago.

Eye On Design: Bench IIa by Max Lamb

bench IIa by max lamb photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

The Bench I I a (2017) by designer Max Lamb is one of the first prototypes made from solid textile board, a material composed of waste cotton.  Lamb created this piece for Really, a Danish company that focuses on upcycling discarded textile waste.

bench IIa by max lamb photo by gail worley
Installation View

Really mills used textiles into small fibers that are then bonded together with a special agent. The dark blue color of this bench comes from the cotton material, which is discarded denim. The bench is at once a functional object and a conversation starter regarding the reuse of waste materials. The museum installation includes a video (iPad screen seen above) in which Lamb discusses the making of the Really collection of furniture.

bench IIa by max lamb photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Art Institute, Chicago.

Eye On Design: Skyscraper Cabinet By Paul T. Frankl

skyscraper cabinet by paul t frankl
Photos By Gail

In 1927, Paul Frankl wrote, “In my own creations for the modern American home, I have kept within the architectural spirit of our time,” citing the New York City skyline as his most powerful design source. Indeed, the architecture of Manhattan is reflected in every detail of Frankl’s Skyscraper Cabinet, including its simplicity, continuity of line, flat surfaces, sharp and clean moldings, quality of restraint, and overall feeling of power. Not even 18-inches deep, Frankl’s cabinet was designed to conserve space in small city apartments. See other examples of Paul Frankl’s Skyscraper-influenced designs Here and Here.

skyscraper cabinet by paul t frankl photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Art Institute, Chicago.

 

Eye On Design: Ettore Sottsass, Cabinet No. 56

ettore sottsass cabinet no 56 photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Ettore Sottsass’ late furniture for Gallery Mourmans liberated the artist from the ordinary constraints of the market and quantity. The collaboration gave him license to pursue the vast poetic and sculptural potential of perhaps his favorite of all design archetypes, the Cabinet.

ettore sottsass cabinet no 56 photo by gail worley

As with Cabinet No. 56 (2003) these pieces read as prototypes, concepts and sculpture. Each cabinet in this series is a study in materials, structure, form, color, and visual and sculptural effects — homages to his friends and design masters.

ettore sottsass cabinet no 56 photo by gail worley

Photographed in The Met Breuer in NYC as part of the 2017 – 2018 Exhibit, Ettore Sottsass: Design Radical.

Eye On Design: Joybird Downloadable Interior Design Coloring Book!

living room coloring book
Color Me Beautiful . . .

Oh man, I can’t even tell you how much I miss being able to go out to see new art, or attend my favorite design shows, such as the Architectural Digest Design Show and ICFF. Maybe you feel as I do, and are looking for new, creative ways to fight lockdown boredom, while also exercising your artistic talent and flair for design. If that is the case, then you will be excited to hear that manufacturers of custom, Mid-century design furniture, Joybird has created a free, downloadable coloring book featuring 8 escape-worthy living spaces for the interior design lover to color as they choose  To start coloring, download the PDFs available at This Link and print them – it’s that easy. Here are a few of the cool room designs included.

bedroom coloring book
The Bedroom

kitchen coloring book
The Kitchen

Joybird would love to see the designs you come up with, so feel free to share your creations on social media with the hashtag #joybirdcolors.

den coloring book
The Den

long chair coloring book
The Study

Eye on Design: Puff and Stuff Chair By Chris Schanck

puff and stuff chair by chris chance photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

What caught my eye immediately on flyers for the 2019 edition of The Salon Art + Design show was the included image of a vibrant Pink version of Chris Schanck’s Puff and Stuff Chair (2019). With it its quilted, glossy velvet upholstery and biomorphic sculptural base comprised of steel, aluminum, polystyrene, polyuria, aluminum foil and resin, the chair manages to look both organic and highly stylized simultaneously. The Pink Puff and Stuff Chair became my number-one-must-see item at the fair, but sadly my dream was not fully realized.

firedman benda booth photo by fail worley
Puff and Stuff Chair Installation View

Friedman Benda, who represent the designer, chose to display Puff and Stuff only in a Sage Green. I was disappointed, sure; but that didn’t mean I wasn’t going to write about the chair. Because, look at how awesome it is.

puff and stuff chair side detail photo by gail worley

It looks like the walls of a futuristic space cave — and please note that no two are alike. These chairs and the accompanying peach-hued pedestal table are inspired by Schanck’s 2018 solo exhibit at Friedman Benda entitled Unhomely, which focused on the designer’s acclaimed sculptural approach.

orange pedestal table detail photo by gail worley

Unhomely featured 15 works with independent, stand-alone narratives woven into an otherworldly landscape. Synthesizing premeditation and spontaneity, Schanck’s highly individualized, low-tech, idiosyncratic technique, Alufoil (in which industrial and discarded materials are sculpted, covered in aluminum foil and then sealed with resin) was conceived in 2011 during his MFA studies. The process begins with Schanck’s imaginative drawings and models, which are then executed by a team of artists and collaborators apprenticed in his Alufoil method.

Installation view photo by gail worley

Hybrids of sculpture and furniture, Schanck’s bold constructions blend biomorphic forms with elaborately crafted symbolism. These assemblages draw from a wide range of influences ranging from Brutalist and Art Deco architecture to ancient Egyptian, Anatolian and Aztec iconography. Skirting the line between refinement and camp, Schanck’s figurative, at times anatomical, creations reference science fiction films and conjure up visions of ancient aliens, hidden cavernous chambers, and monolithic space operas.

2 puff and stuff chairs photo by gail worley

Despite overt references to fantasy and meta-fiction, Schanck’s assemblages are grounded in the reality of humanity’s relentless  inventiveness. “In my work,” the Detroit native admits, “I take inspiration from the people and forms around me and dip them into a futuristic skin.”

Photographed in the booth for Friedman Benda at the Salon Art + Design 2019 in NYC.

Eye on Design: Tiger Chimney By Jean-Marie Fiori

Chimney by Jean Marie Fiori Photo by Gail Worley
Photos By Gail Worley

Jean Marie Fiori is a French sculptor born in Limoges. He graduated from the National School of Fine Arts (École Nationale des Beaux-arts) in Paris, where he is now based. Formerly a painter, Fiori is devoted to sculpture and more specifically, to the representation of animals.  During the years, the artist/designer improved his mastery of bronze and enriched his imaginary bestiary of designed furniture and monumental installations. In 2010,  Fiori was selected by the Chinese Official Committee of World Expo in Shanghai to create a set of urban furniture consisting of five benches. Inspired by traditional Chinese symbols, he reinterpreted turtle, bull, tiger, buffalo and duck. Over time, he developed a language of plastic arts closer to that of the Decorative Arts. He transformed deer into chairs and falcons into tables, with a sense of humor and his own originality specific to his works. This Tiger Chimney / Fire Place in patinated bronze was produced in a signed and numbered edition of 8 plus 4 Artist Proofs. Inquire Here for pricing.

chimney installation view photo by gail worley
Installation View

Photographed at the Salon Art + Design 2019 in NYC.

Eye on Design: Accessible Icon By Tim Ferguson Sauder

accessible icon photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

The original International Symbol of Access (image below) was designed in 1969 by Susanne Koefoed. Enlarged above is the Accessible Icon, a recent redesign that portrays a person in forward motion, propelling through space. Surrounded by small images that depict various iterations, the new symbol represents people in wheelchairs as dynamic, rather than static bodies. The Accessible Icon Project began as a social intervention with the goal of making cities more inclusive. Its symbol is open source and available in a multitude of formats and sizes. This image was designed by Tim Ferguson Sauder, Brian Glenney and Sara Hendren between 2009 and 2011.

wheelchair accessible symbol

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: Floral Appliquéd Evening Dress By House of Chanel

floral appliquéd evening dress by chanel photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

At the end of the 1920s, the prior emphasis on lavish surface embellishment transferred to printed textiles, which were fashioned into a variety of romantic permutations. The elegant ombre-dyed silk chiffon of this evening dress was likely created for Gabrielle Chanel at her own Tissus Chanel factory in Asnières-sur-Seine, France. The delicate manipulation of the textile in this Floral Appliquéd Evening Dress (spring/summer 1935) is evidence of the superior capabilities of the Chanel  couture workrooms

floral appliquéd evening dress by chanel photo by gail worley

The gown’s bias-cut fabric drapes and clings to the figure, gathering into delicately ruched straps at the shoulders and swelling into soft folds around the hem. Individual picot-edged florets are backed with net to create volume and strategically appliquéd throughout the garment to further enhance the printed motifs, resulting in tactile bouquets that gently flutter when the wearer moves.

floral appliquéd evening dress by chanel photo by gail worley

Photographed as part of the exhibit In Pursuit of Fashion: The Sandy Schreier Collection, on view through May 17th, 2020 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Upholstered Chair Hat By Karl Lagerfeld

upholstered chair hat by karl lagerfeld photo by gail worley
Photos by Gail

Karl Lagerfeld (19382019), an avid collector of rare books, art and antiques, conceived of a series of accessories inspired by eighteenth-century French decorative arts for his autumn/winter 1985-86 collection. The fashion designer worked closely with milliner Kirsten Woodward to arrive at this Upholstered Chair Hat, and other witty translations of miniaturized furniture based on Lagerfeld’s sketched interpretations of original objects from reference photos.

upholstered chair hat by karl lagerfeld photo by gail worley

The resulting hats were a playful pastiche of historical references, infused with elements of Surrealism and executed with vivid opulence that was often characteristic of 1980s fashion.

Photographed as part of the exhibit In Pursuit of Fashion: The Sandy Schreier Collection, on view through May 17th, 2020 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.