Tag Archive | Eye on Design

Eye On Design: Million Dollar Sandals By Stuart Weitzman

Million Dollar Sandals
Photos By Gail

What we now refer to as the Red Carpet debuted at the 1922 premiere of Robin Hood, starring Douglas Fairbanks, the “First King of Hollywood.” Today, the pre-show parade of stars outside the Academy Awards is arguable as important to the fashion industry as the ceremony itself it to film. For the 2002 Oscars, actress Laura Elena Harring (Mulholland Drive) wore a pair of Stuart Weitzman stilettos ornamented with 464 Kwiat diamonds. While the shoes shown here are a 2012 reproduction, the original Million Dollar Sandals inspired the installation of a shoe-level camera on the red carpet, shifting fashion’s gaze decidedly footward. The designer also issued the famous shoes with a more affordable Swarovski crystals option.

Photographed as Part of Walk This Way: Footwear from the Stuart Weitzman Collection of Historic Shoes, on Exhibit Through October 8th, 2018, at the New York Historical Society, Located at 77th Street and CPW in NYC.

Million Dollar Sandals

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Eye On Design: Tiffany Wisteria Lamps Designed by Clara Driscoll

Tiffany Wisteria Lamps
Photo By Gail

One of Tiffany Studios‘ most popular models, the Wisteria, was priced as $400 in 1906, placing it among the firm’s most costly lamps. The glass selection for the two lamps (both circa 1901) seen in the above photo created two dramatically different interpretations of the same design. One has a refined color palette ranging from pale blue to azure and cobalt, while the other displays bold contrasts of blue and white clusters.

Wisteria abounded in LC Tiffany’s leaded glass windows and on the grounds of his country estate, Laurelton Hall, and although the vine was a Tiffany favorite, Clara Driscoll’s correspondence identifies her as the designer of the iconic Wisteria lamp, which is composed of nearly 2,000 tiny pieces of glass. Designs for the Trumpet Creeper, Grape, and Apple Blossom, each sold with the same treelike base, followed shortly after the Wisteria.

Photographed in the New York Historical Society on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

Eye On Design: Thigh High, Platform Kinky Boots Designed By Gregg Barnes

Kinky Boots Designed By Gregg Barnes
Photos By Gail

By the end of the 17th Century, high heels were considered women’s shoes. Indeed, so strong was the connection between shoes and gender that a man wearing high heels could be arrested in New York under a law that forbade people from congregating in public while “disguised by unusual or unnatural attire.” First passed in 1845 to suppress masked political protests, this law was later used to justify the arrest of cross-dressing performers and bar patrons. Many similar laws persisted until the late twentieth century, when changing fashions and cultural norms rendered them unenforceable

Kinky Boots Worn By Actor Billy Porter
Kinky Boots Worn By Actor Billy Porter

Today, high-heeled shoes have appeared everywhere, from boardrooms to bedrooms to courtrooms. They have been called many things: Ultra-feminine, aggressive, provocative, misogynistic, glamorous, fetishistic, immobilizing, erotic, empowering, stylish — just about everything but comfortable.

Kinky Boots Designed By Gregg Barnes

Gregg Barnes designed these patent metallic leather high-heeled platform lace-up boots in 2013  for the Broadway musical Kinky Boots, which is based on the true story of a struggling shoe factory that survived by producing high-heeled fetish footwear in men’s sizes.

Photographed as Part of Walk This Way: Footwear from the Stuart Weitzman Collection of Historic Shoes, on Exhibit Through October 8th, 2018, at the New York Historical Society, Located at 77th Street and CPW in NYC.

Eye On Design: Foscarini’s Light Bulb Series By James Wines / SITE

Inversion Room Inside
Immersive Reverse Room Installation at Foscarini Showroom Featuring The Light Bulb Series (All Photos By Gail)

NYCxDESIGN is New York City’s annual showcase of all things Design-related! Must-attend events include a Saturday evening (May 19th) filled with parties hosted by dozens of SoHo showrooms, where you can get caught up on all the latest trends in furniture and lighting while eating and drinking yourself into a stupor. It’s all kinds of crazy fun. We saw a ton of cool stuff this year, but I think we had the best time at one of the evening’s early stops, the showroom of Italian Lighting experts, Foscarini, which is located on Greene Street right in the center of all the hot design action!

Reverse Room Full View

On this evening, Foscarini were celebrating the launch of The Light Bulb Series, by Architect/Designer James Wines in association with SITE— the architecture and environmental arts studio that he founded in New York City in 1970.

Light Bulb Series
The Light Bulb Series on Display in the Foscarini Showroom

The Light Bulb Series is a designer art-house collection consisting of a limited and numbered edition of pieces – based on a reflection of the light bulb as an archetype, with its typical bulb-like shape, produced in a series of surprising provocations, as follows:

White Light

Black Light

Melting Light

Candle Light

Plant Light

James Wines translates this reflection with explorations that revolve around the principal themes that have always guided his architectural research. These are inversion, dissolution, nature, all those statuses of “architectural flaw” which make it possible to rethink reality, giving it shape and then at the same time breaking down its boundaries. Wines’s light bulbs are in turn melted, broken, inverted, turned black, and invaded by nature. A propensity towards experimentation, doing better but also doing differently, which has always animated Foscarini as well.

Plant Light and Black Light

White Melting Candle Light

Reverse Room

The focal point of the party however was Wine’s Reverse Room installation, which he designed together with his daughter Suzan Wines, both of whom were in attendance for the evening.

Reverse Room Table

The endlessly Instagrammable Reverse Room was devised to emphasise the surreal quality of these experimentations: in a dark-walled room, upside down and slanted, with monochrome tables and chairs, the table lamps blink down from the ceiling, whereas the suspension lamps peep out from the floor.

Reverse Room Suspended Bulbs

It is an invitation to think of a world, of design, and therefore of what is possible, where it is always imaginable to shed light differently.

Light Bulb Series Card

Visit Foscarini’s website at This Link for more information on The light Bulb Series and other Foscarini Lighting Designs!

Plant Light and Black Light

Eye On Design: o432 ‘Acupressure’ Lounge Chair By Jean-Frederic Fesseler

0432 Lounge Chair
All Photos By Gail

Combining visually appealing modern design aesthetics with Ergonomics, the well-tried wooden bead mat is the godfather of the o432 Lounge Chair from furniture designer Jean-Frederic Fesseler. Flexible wooden beads make up the seat and backrest, which have an effect similar to that of acupressure and are meant to relax and stimulate.

0432 Lounge Chair Detail
Wooden Bead Detail

The color combinations of its limited edition series are designed by Ruprecht Dreher, a master student of Joseph Beuys. The o432 Long Chair was also awarded a prestigious international Interior Innovation Award.

0432 Lounge Chairs

Photographed at ICFF 2018 At Javits Center, NYC.

Eye On Design: Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier
All Photos By Gail

While he is mainly known as a true icon of the fashion world, designer Jean Paul Gaultier has also spent more then two decades invested with furniture manufacturing. In collaboration with French furniture-maker, Roche Bobois, Gaultier has launched his “sexy and bedroom inspired” furniture collection, and the Roman chariot-inspired Ben Hur armchair belongs to this collection.

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier

The Ben Hur armchair — which looks just like a Modern, Barrel-Design Club Chair when viewed from a straight ahead angle– has an aluminum structure and stylish velvet upholstering that is available in four colors: red (shown here) yellow, blue and green. Like almost every piece from the designer’s collection, this chair has wheels, because Gaultier has made his furniture on the idea of extra mobility. The objective is that people wanting to be able to move each item from one room to another.

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier Left Front

Also, it’s a lot fun, and will certainly make a bold personal statement about its owner is any room of the home.

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier

Suggested Retail Price: $6,500 each. Available from Roche Bobois and other fine retailers.

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier

Photographed at the ICFF 2018 at Javits Center, NYC.

Eye On Design: Exclamation Collection French Art Deco Arm Chair

Exclamation-ized French Art Deco Arm Chair
A Chair Fit For Royalty! (All Photos By Gail)

It took a little bit of hunting but, after a couple of hours on the floor, we found the Oh, Wow! item at this year’s ICFF show at Javits Center: this breathtaking bespoke Art Deco Arm Chair by designer John Landrum Bryant.

John explained to me that by stripping the signed Paris circa 1925 chair that he and his wife had purchased from the Steinitz Gallery in Paris many years ago, he created this one-of-a-kind piece, which belongs in his Exclamation! collection. The first step in the chair’s dramatic transformation was stripping and cleaning its intricate carved wood frame, which was first covered with a vibrant bluish lambskin to preserve every detail, and then a metallic pink finish.

Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Right Front
Upholstery and Finish Details Above and Below
Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Left Front

The chair was partially upholstered from one piece of cowhide, both plain and also embossed with good dots, in an indescribable shade of pink.

Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Right Front

Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Left Side and Back

Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Right Side

With this as the starting point, things really became interesting: lambskin in silver, in green and in pewter, an antique Japanese silk obi, and turquoise python all dance about this incomparable creation.

Dimensions are as follows:

Length: 30″

Width: 30″

Height” 36″

Exclamation-ized French Art Deco Arm Chair

This chair, which is unique and will not be copied, retails for $18,950 ($13,265 to the Trade). For purchase inquires, please visit This Link!

Exclamation-ized French Art Deco Arm Chair