Tag Archive | Eye on Design

Eye On Design: Chaise Lounge LC/4, Collaborative Design

Chaise Lounge LC/4
Photos By Gail

Inspired by bentwood rocking chairs by Michael Thonet, and recumbent doctor’s chairs, the angle of repose on this Chaise Lounge LC/4 (1928)  is adjusted by sliding the chromed steel frame on its stationary base. The LC/4 was a collaborative design of Le Corbusier (Charles-Edouard Jeanneret), Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand, spearheaded by  Perriand, who had designed other furnishings in tubular steel before joining Le Corbusier’s studio. The model was prominently displayed in numerous exhibition settings designed by Perriand, including the 1929 Paris Salon d’Automne and the Internationale Raumausstellung in 1931 in Cologne.
Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Chaise Lounge LC/4 Installation View
Installation View

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Eye On Design: Studded Levi’s Denim Jacket By Billy Shire

Studded Levis Denim Jacket
All Photos By Gail

In 1974, Billy Shire was working on a Studded Denim Jacket to advertise his studding business, and decided to enter  it into the Levi’s Denim Art Contest. His entry, Welfare (1975), which won the competition, is embellished with eleven pounds of rivets, rhinestone rim sets and oversize upholstery tacks typically used on leather and furniture.

Studded Levis Denim Jacket Detail

It also incorporates an ashtray and a hotel desk bell, which chimes while the jacket is being worn.

Studded Levis Denim Jacket Installation View
Installation View with Jacket on Far Right

Studded Levis Denim Jacket Installation View

Shire has created stage costumes and street wear  for Elton John, as well as members of the bands Chicago and The Doobie Brothers

Theses Photographs were Taken at the Exhibit, Counter-Couture: Handmade Fashion in an American Counterculture  on Display Through August 20th, 2017 at the Museum of Arts and Design, Located at 2 Columbus Circle (at 58th Street and 8th Avenue), in NYC.

Studded Levis Denim Jacket Photo

Eye On Design: Daybed By New Tendency

Daybed By New Tendency
All Photos By Gail

When I first saw this minimal-yet-gorgeous modern Daybed, I thought I might choose it as a Pink Thing of the Day, but ultimately its functionality swayed me towards the week’s featured design post. Spotted as part of Chamber Boutique’s latest collection, Berlin-based design practice New Tendency has developed a daybed made from honed stainless steel and hand-selected, pure vegan tanned leather. I’m not sure if the cushion is available in other colors, but I think the pale pink looks just perfect against the silver-toned, brushed metal finish. You could build so many looks around this piece.

Daybed By New Tendency
DayBed Shown Here with Cannit Bin and Shelter

New Tendency applies modernist design principles onto the everyday contemporary objects. In Bauhaus tradition, they create products characterized by conceptual design, clean aesthetics and functional form, all handcrafted in Germany. The collection of furniture and accessories develops under the creative direction of Manuel Goller, and consists of original products developed with associate Sebastian Schonheit, as well as collaborations with selected designers and architects such as Clemens Tissi, and others.

Daybed By New Tendency

Eye On Design: Neon Desk Light (Blue) By Jochen Holz

Neon Desk Lamp
All Photos By Gail

A couple of weeks ago, we made a run by Chamber on West 23rd Street to check out their newest collection of functional, limited edition artworks and home goods. As usual, more than a few items piqued our interest. We especially like this lamp by London-based blown glass artist and designer, Jochen Holz.

Neon Desk Lamp

The Neon Desk Light is a unique, freestanding light sculpture made of free formed borosilicate glass tubing. Each is one of its kind and part of a small edition. Says Holz about this creation, “I am using much bigger tubing diameters and wall thicknesses to create shapes which couldn’t be achieved with conventional neon making.  The forms play with the light emitted by the different rare gases, the undulating tube subtly manipulates the light, softening and intensifying it in turns. There are no coatings or filaments, just the pure light radiating from within the tube. The lights have an estimated lifetime of about 30 to 40 thousand hours.”

This fun modern lamp also comes in Red. Contact the store at info@chambernyc.com for pricing.

Photographed at the Chamber Boutique on 23rd Street, West of the High Line / 10th Avenue.
Neon Desk Lamp

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Eye On Design: Indian Chief Roadmaster Motorcycle

Indian Chief Motorcycle
All Photos By Gail

The Indian Chief Roadmaster was designed as a handsome, comfortable rival to Harley-Davidson’s heavyweight touring bikes as Americans took to the road in the years following World War II. Indian’s top model, the Chief Roadmaster (1948) exuded power and style. Note the Indian Head on the front fender as well as the custom-fringed leatherwork. Now, imagine how it would look flying in the wind as the bike speeds toward the horizon!

Indian Chief Motorcycle
Photographed in the Autry Museum pf the American West in Los Angeles, California.

Eye On Design: Glass Armchair by Shiro Kuramata

Glass Armchair
Photographed By Gail in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum

In the mid-to-late 20th century, an atmosphere of innovation and a desire to question the tenets of modernism led some designers to explore a variety of ways in which to shape space. American Architect and Designer Alexander Hayden Girard utilized color and pattern in textiles, particularly in this colorful abstract, or folk art-inspired work for Herman Miller.

Glass Armchair at Albertz Benda
Photographed at Albertz Benda Gallery

By 1970, Japanese Architect and Interior Designer  Shiro Kuramata (1934 – 1991) was introducing alternative materials such as acrylic and industrial plate glass into his furniture. Utilizing a newly developed adhesive, Kuramata achieved material and visual minimalism with this Glass Armchair (1976). Flat planes of glass are bonded together along their edges, without mounts or screws, to create a functional chair that seems simultaneously visible and invisible. The transparent form invites users to question notions of materiality, utility and comfort.

Eye On Design: Stylaire Kitchen Stepladder

Stylaire Kitchen Stepladder
All Photos By Gail

Utility meets design is this Stylaire Kitchen Stepladder (circa 1950) designed and manufactured by Cosco Home and Office Products. I photographed this piece in the visible storage rooms at the Brooklyn Museum because t reminded me of one just like this that we had in our house when I was growing up (60s – 70s). Nostalgia! Part chair, part step stool, this design was inspired midcentury by the traditional library step-chair, and is still manufactured by Cosco today.

Stylaire Kitchen Stepladder