Tag Archive | Pace Prints

Photos: Shepard Fairey at Pace Prints and Jacob Lewis Gallery

3 Prints
All Photos By Gail

Pace Prints is currently hosting an exhibition of new print editions by Shepard Fairey, running concurrently with Shepard Fairey: On Our Hands at Jacob Lewis Gallery, the artist’s first solo exhibition of paintings in New York City in five years.

Cigarettes

In his new series of prints on handmade paper, Fairey takes on the issue of corporate influence in government and the resulting inaction toward environmental concerns by the powers that be.

Enjoy Paradise

In Enjoy Paradise, a 3-color relief print, what at first appears to be an advertisement for a relaxing beach getaway quickly reveals itself to be a bleak landscape where the water flows like an oil slick, and towers loom forebodingly in the background.

Paint It Black

In his signature black, cream and red color palette, Fairey combines imagery and text in a tongue-in-cheek manner to speak about serious economic and political issues. Paint it Black, pays homage to the history of rock and roll, using Russian constructivist-inspired graphics to depict a hazardous paint can of “Oil Based Policy,” jutting out into the viewers’ space.

Power

Crowd

Although, as you can see by the above photos,  there was a good deal of breathing room on the 3rd floor during the show’s opening reception, it was a different story on the 4th flo0r, where Fairey was present and signing for fans as well as posing for photos. He is very friendly and accommodating.

Shepard and Fans

Here is the artist being mobbed by fans.

Gas Pump Book

The exhibit also contains some cool sculptures, all of which carry the strong message against the USA‘s “War for Oil” policy.  It is very sobering.

Eagle on Gas Pump

Eagle Pearching on a Fist-Enclosed Gas Pump

Eagle on Gas Pump Detail

Detail from Above Sculpture

Soldier

Arab Women

Obey Collection

Print Collection 1

These exhibits are definitely Must See Art for Shepard Fairey Fans!

Sinking Ship

Two Prints

Shepard Fairey’s Prints and Paintings will be on Exhibit Through October 17th, 2015 at Pace Prints (on the third floor) and through October 24th at Jacob Lewis Gallery (on the fourth floor) at 521 West 26th Street.

Street Sign

Shepard Fairey Signage

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Ryan McGinness Figure Drawings at Pace Prints

Ryan McGuiness Figure Drawing Installation View
All Photos By Gail

Pace Prints is currently hosting Ryan McGinness: Figure Drawings, the artist’s second exhibition at the gallery. I can’t say I’m sorry that I missed the opening reception, because how could you possibly get good photos of these works in a gallery full of people?

Ryan McGinness Neon Nude Multi

Figure Drawings is a continuation of the McGinness’s Women series, which he started working on in 2010. Drawing directly from nude models, he approaches these drawings in the same manner in which he creates his signature undulating and layered icons.

Ryan McGinness Neon Nude Red

McGinness begins with sketches, and refines those drawings down into their basic and most essential forms. In the Women series, the artist simultaneously embraces the inherent sensuality of his models through their graceful lines and gentle curves, while allowing his iconic drawings to be less about the individual woman and more about presentations of universal womanhood.

Ryan McGinness Halftone Nude

Entwining the cool glow of various neon lights with his women, composed of flat shapes à la Matisse, the works are at once signage, symbol, and live interaction. With neon, there is no real substitute to seeing these electric drawings in person as photographs cannot fully capture the colorful hazed effect on the figure. This sexy emitted light glows on the entire exhibition, giving a spectacle buzz to the full body of works.

Ryan McGinness Neon Women Parts

 

Ryan McGinness Neon Women Parts

Also included in the exhibition are a series of new fluorescent silkscreened Women Parts, porcelain-baked enamel on steel panels, halftoned models on linen, and mirror polished stainless steel works with etched figures—which resonate with the neon lights, layering images in reflection.

 

Ryan McGinness Neon and Mirrors

Definitely check this one out while you can.

Ryan McGinness Pink Mirror Nude

Ryan McGinness Figure Drawings will be on Exhibit through June 7th, 2014 at Pace Prints, Located at 521 Westr 26th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District

How and Nosm: Way Things Are at Pace Prints

How and Nosm Way Things Are
All Photos By Gail (Click Image to Enlarge for Detail)

Pace Prints is currently hosting Way Things Are, an exhibition of new hand-painted monoprints by identical twin artists Raoul and Davide Perre, better known by the moniker How and Nosm. This is the artists’ inaugural exhibition with Pace Prints. Fans of the duo will immediately recognize their distinctive style and their favored color palette of reds pinks, black and grey.

Here are a few of our favorite pieces from the show:

How and Nosm Way Things Are

How and Nosm Way Things Are

How and Nosm Way Things Are

How and Nosm Way Things Are

How and Nosm Way Things Are
Detail From the Painting Above

How and Nosm: Way Things Are is on Exhibit Through April 5th, 2014 at Pace Prints, Located at 521 West 26th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

How and Nosm Signage

Shepard Fairey’s Harmony & Discord at Pace Prints

Shepard Fairey At Pace Prints Invite

All Photos Courtesy of Juxtapose Dot Com

Thanks to Geoffrey’s incredible talent for scheduling an evening that includes multiple events located across town from each other, we were able to make an extended pit stop at Pace Prints for the opening night of Shepard’s Fairey’s amazing new exhibit, Harmony & Discord, wedged between attending a Kehinde Wiley opening on 29th Street and a lovely evening seeing Brendon Benson perform at the Bowery Ballroom. Timing!

Shepard Fairey is one of my favorite contemporary artists and this latest exhibit is the most exciting collection of his work that I’ve seen so far. Fairey created the works for Harmony & Discord in the Pace Editions studios in New York, which provided him with the opportunity to scale the work to a larger size, so the exhibit includes the largest screenprints he has done to date. If you are familiar with Shepard Fairey’s work you know that he started out as a street artist, creating the global “Obey” sticker campaign and continued his politically-themed art (Fairy’s best-known work is the iconic and much-copied Obama Hope poster) as he moved from the street into the galleries of New York, Los Angeles and Europe.

Shepard Fairey at Pace Prints 1

On view in Harmony & Discord are a number of silkscreens done with collage and spraypaint, as well as handmade paper (his first works with this medium), embossment and relief prints, and large metal plates with screenprint. Relating to the surfaces of his street work, the hand painted multiple (HPM) works in this series have backgrounds of stenciled pulp, collage, screenprint and embossment, allowing the image to pop off of its vintage, layered surface. The Pace Prints exhibition also marks the first time Fairey is presenting metal relief plates as art pieces, layered with silkscreen, furthering spatial extent within the work. The metal plates are so finely detailed, and these were definitely my favorite pieces in the exhibit. You have to see them up close to appreciate how beautiful they are. I also really liked the pieces that were heavily influenced by the Comic Book Art motif of the late pop artist, Roy Lichtenstein.

Shepard Fairey At Pace Prints 2

Shepard was in attendance at Saturday’s opening and he was so nice and attentive to his fans! He will sign anything you have with you, pose for a photo, give you stickers and even take the time to thoroughly and thoughtfully answer any questions you ask him, even though many people were waiting to have five seconds with him. So nice! Thank you Shepard Fairey for your wonderful art and for being such a cool person!

Shepard Fairey and Gail Worley
Photo of Gail & Shepard by Geoffrey Dicker

Harmony & Discord will be on exhibit through June 16th, 2012 at Pace Prints, located at 521 West 26th Street, 3rd & 4th Floors, New York, NY 10001. Gallery Hours are Tuesday -Friday: 10: 00 AM to 6:00 PM and Saturday: 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM