Tag Archive | Neon

Neon Tiger

Neon Tiger
Photo By Gail

Unless I am in some kind of crazy hurry, getting temporarily lost or misdirected in NYC is always a blessing, because it allows me to stumble upon amazing finds like this fantastic Neon Tiger. I spotted this beauty, from the sidewalk, inside a casual menswear boutique called Blue In Green, which is located on Greene Street, one block above Canal, in SoHo. Grrr.

Frieze 2019: A Photo Recap of The Fair’s Best Art!

Yayoi Kusama Narcissus Garden
Yayoi Kusama’s Narcissus Garden Sculpture/Installation Paired With Chris Ofili’s Painting To Take and To Give (All Photo By Gail)

On a very rainy Sunday in NYC, the ideal indoor activity turned out  be a ferry ride over to Randall’s Island for the Frieze Art Fair! Because what’s a little mud on your shoes compared to the joy of browsing for hours through thousands of prohibitively expensive artworks?

Yayoi Kusama Narcissus Garden
It Isn’t an Art Fair Without Yayoi Kusama!

Looking back through the digital archives, it appears that my previously most recent Frieze recap dates all the way back to 2015 — wow — for reasons that take too long to talk about. One thing that is abundantly clear though is that my skills as a photographer have improved greatly in the last four years! Let’s take look around this year’s Frieze Art Fair and check out a selection of my favorite art!

Carlotta

Carlotta (2017) is monumental 3D-effect stiles steel sculpture by Juame Pensa, found at Richard Grey Gallery. That’s an Alex Katz abstract painting at the left.

Colored Mirrored Circles

It didn’t take me long get distract by shiny things, because I neglected to note the artist of this installation of Colored Spherical Shaped Mirrors, which is just fantastic.

Metal Weed

It might look like a weed has sprouted up though a crack in the wall at the booth for the Marlborough Gallery, but that weed is actually a metal sculpture. Clever!

Quartz Eroded Newspaper Machine

Quartz Eroded Newspaper Machine (2019) by Daniel Arsham.

Quartz Eroded Newspaper Machine

Here’s the view of another side: Coffee Cup included! Spotted at Perrotin Gallery.

You Drive Me Crazy.

Two colorful, feathered bears wrestle playfully in this sculpture by Paola Pivi entitled You Drive Me Crazy, also at Perrotin Gallery.

Numbers

You know how it is when you have to wait so long for all of the people to clear out of the shot that your forget to make note of what you were photographing? This is one of those times.

Untitled After John Singleton Copley
Untitled (After John Singleton Copley) By Ewa Juszkiewicz

Mermaid Sculptures By Olivia Erlanger

Mermaid Sculptures by Olivia Erlanger at And Now Gallery sell for $8,000 each!

Back and Forth May Marilyn Lerner
Back and Forth (2016) By Marilyn Lerner at Kate Werble Gallery

Alyson Shotz at Derek Eller Gallery

Alyson Shotz created this iridescent suspended soft sculpture made from interlinked, dichroic-dyed aluminum discs, found at Derek Eller Gallery. Check out two detail views of this work, below.

Alyson Shotz at Derek Eller Gallery

Surface of Discs. Exterior.

Alyson Shotz at Derek Eller Gallery

Surface of Discs, Interior.

Gabriele Beveridge True Bone

Here’s a unique blown-glass work by Gabriele Beveridge called True Bone. It’s so lovely I am compelled to offer a side view from which you can see how the glass ‘weeps’ over the chromed Steele frame, or bone.

Gabriele Beveridge True Bone

Men Who Cannot Cry

Men Who Cannot Cry (2018) Neon Sculpture by Alfredo Jaar.

Mark Thomas Gibson The Snowman

Mark Thomas Gibson, The Snowman (2018) at Fredericks and Freiser.

Seung-Taek Lee
Stainless Steel and Urethane Vinyl Sculptures and Drawings by Seung-Taek Lee at Gallery Hyundai.

Alex Da Corte Orb Weaver Weft
Alex Da Corte, Orb Weaver Weft (2019) at Karma Gallery.

Indigo Illusions
Indigo Illusions (1991) By Betye Saar at Roberts Projects.

Empowered Women
Empowered Women (2019) By Andrea Bowers at Andrew Kreps Gallery

This neon sign switched up its timely message by having the “ed” in “Empowered” flicker off and on. Nice.

Metaphysical Leg Pull By Duggie Fields
Metaphysical Leg Pull (1976) By Duggie Fields, at The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd.

You Should Be Dancing (2018)
You Should Be Dancing (2018) By Jim Lambie

This reflective wall sculpture made from the lenses of sunglasses was also spotted at the both for at The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd.

Mirror Balloons By Jeppe Hein
Mirror Balloons By Jeppe Hein (2019) at 303 Gallery of New York.

Sculptures By Marta Chilindron

Colorful Acrylic Sculptures By Marta Chilindron (Above and Below).

Sculpture By Marta Chilindron

My Life As A Tree
My Life As A Tree By Edouard Duval-Carrie (2019) at Lyle OReitzel Gallery.

Shiatsu
Shiatsu (2019) By Max Hooper Schneider

Now here’s a modern sculpture that has everything! Max Hooper Schneider’s Shiatsu takes a custom acyclic vitrine  — that an observer might easily mistake for an ordinary household aquarium — and creates a surreal habitat filled with hand tools scattered among the lush terrarium plant life and accented with a vintage neon sign! Let’s take a closer look.

Shiatsu Detail

Spectacular! Hooper Schneider’s work is represented by Maureen Paley Gallery of London.

Gate By Tony Cragg

Avid readers of The ‘Gig might recognize this freeform abstract sculpture as the work of sculptor Tony Cragg from This Post, though the one above, entitled Gate (2017) is of a much, much smaller scale!

Sound Suit By Nick Cave

Look Up: It’s one of Nick Cave’s Sound Suits!

Raked Leaves (Apparition)

Raked Leaves (Apparition) (2019) by Patrick Jacobs is a tiny diorama that was embedded into the wall of the booth for Pierogi Gallery of New York.

February (2018) by Devan Shimoyama

Check out this fabulous silk flower and bead-embellished hoodie sculpture, February (2018) by Devan Shimoyama. I would wear it.

Well that about wraps up this year’s Frieze coverage. If you dig the photos in this post please share the love and share the link on your social media! Art!

Pink Thing The Day: Vintage Pink Plasma Sphere!

Pink Plasma Sphere
Photos By Gail

If you happen to live near, or be visiting, the city of Glendale, California — as I was over the Christmas Holidaze — and you also love Neon signs and other types of neon-based artworks, be sure to stop by the Museum of Neon Art. MONA is small museum, just one big room basically, with a rotating collection of vintage neon signs and other neon artworks, as well as temporary exhibits, and its admission price is $10 well-spent for this non-profit venue that also hosts Neon Art Making classes! Towards the rear of the museum gallery is small niche that’s easy to miss if you don’t explore thoroughly (it was pointed out to me by a docent) where you can see vintage plasma tubes and spheres, including the one seen in this post, on which the ubiquitous commercial Plasma Balls that we all owned in the 1980s (I still have mine) were based. Neato.

MONA (Museum of Neon Art) is Located at 216 S. Brand Blvd. (Corner of Caruso) in Glendale, CA 91204

Somos 11 Millones / We Are 11 Million On The High Line

We Are 11 Million
Photo By Gail

Andrea Bowers is a Los Angeles-based artist working in video, drawing, and installation that combines art and activism in order to draw attention to the struggle for social justice. For the High Line, Bowers presents a continuation of her ongoing work supporting the DREAMers, individuals who came to the United States at an early age without documentation, who have assimilated to U.S. culture, and who have been educated in the U.S. School system.

Here’s what the sign looks like at night.

We Are 11 Million

The message is written in Spanish on one side and in English on the other.

Somos 11 Millones

Bowers invited the immigration activist group Movimiento Cosecha to write a slogan in support of DREAMers, realized as a neon sign reading “Somos 11 Millones / We Are 11 Million,” which is the number of undocumented immigrants in the United States.

Part of the Agora Project, Installed on The High Line (Under the Standard Hotel) Through March of 2019.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Bruce Nauman, Human Nature / Life Death

Human Nature / Life Death
All Photos By Gail

Bruce Nauman’s neon sculpture, Human Nature / Life Death (1983) is a circle of words corresponding to the defining contradictions of human existence — life and death, love and hate, pleasure and pain — are trisected by the words “Animal,” “Human” and “Nature.”

Human Nature / Life Death

Human Nature

Animal Nature

In the aggregate, the words form a colorful, illuminated peace symbol. Human Nature / Life Death is anything but serene or amicable, however, and not only because of its content. As the words flash and darken erratically, Nauman’s neon devolves into a jumble of disjointed signs that break the continuity of the composition and jerk the eye across the wall.

Human Nature / Life Death

Photographed in The Met Breuer in Manhattan.

Video Clip of The Week: Djustin, “Dancing”


Hey Bitches, everyone’s Favorite Thing, The Video Clip of The Week, makes a hard comeback for Spring with an awesome tune to get you movin’ and groovin’ on a Sunday morning — and if you don’t quite feel like moving just yet, you have something cool to look at — with Djustin’s neon-infused video for their uber hot synth-pop dance track, appropriately entitled “Dancing”! Because, Dancing!

Djustin is an unstoppable power duo comprised of Sweden’s Johan Angergård and his American partner, Rose Suau, and together they create something truly primal. “Dancing” wastes no time at all getting right to the heart of the club experience, putting the transcendent power of dance floor right in your head. Lyric videos have never looked as spectacular as this visual bombardment  of Hot Pink and Bright Turquoise Neon signage delivering the message directly to your cerebral cortex against a backdrop of mirror-ball rays and tiny reflective shards of glittery stuff, all buoyed by Suau’s seductive vocal hooks reminiscent of  Shannon’s 1983 smash hit, “Let The Music Play.” Resistance is futile.

“Dancing” can be found on Djustin’s upcoming full-length album Voyagers, which will be released on May 5th, 2017. Like them on the FaceBook at This Link! Enjoy!

Djustin Band
Photo By Bengt Rahm

Eye On Design: Neon Desk Light (Blue) By Jochen Holz

Neon Desk Lamp
All Photos By Gail

A couple of weeks ago, we made a run by Chamber on West 23rd Street to check out their newest collection of functional, limited edition artworks and home goods. As usual, more than a few items piqued our interest. We especially like this lamp by London-based blown glass artist and designer, Jochen Holz.

Neon Desk Lamp

The Neon Desk Light is a unique, freestanding light sculpture made of free formed borosilicate glass tubing. Each is one of its kind and part of a small edition. Says Holz about this creation, “I am using much bigger tubing diameters and wall thicknesses to create shapes which couldn’t be achieved with conventional neon making.  The forms play with the light emitted by the different rare gases, the undulating tube subtly manipulates the light, softening and intensifying it in turns. There are no coatings or filaments, just the pure light radiating from within the tube. The lights have an estimated lifetime of about 30 to 40 thousand hours.”

This fun modern lamp also comes in Red. Contact the store at info@chambernyc.com for pricing.

Photographed at the Chamber Boutique on 23rd Street, West of the High Line / 10th Avenue.
Neon Desk Lamp

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Iván Navarro’s Mute Parade at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Impenetrable Room
Impenetrable Room By Iván Navarro All Photos By Gail

Paul Kasmin Gallery’s Tenth Avenue space is currently hosting Mute Parade, an exhibit of light installations by  Chilean-born artist Iván Navarro, for his second solo show with the gallery. Mute Parade transforms multiple gallery rooms into a synesthetic environment continuing Navarro’s ongoing use of light, sound, and language to engage with issues of power, migration, and propaganda.

First Gallery Installation View

Upon entering the gallery, the viewer is faced with a series of new works by the artist including Tuning (2015), a pyramid of six towering drums.

Tuning

Navarro combines the drums with mirrors and the words High, Tone, Tune, Bass, Mute, and Deaf to create a visual representation idea of sound (or noise) while at the same time removing and negating the original function of the instruments. This is a way of “playing a song” without making any sound.

MEBE

None of What You Hear

Center Room Installation View

In the center of the adjacent room, there are two freestanding 6-foot diameter drums that incorporate neon, LED lights, mirrors, and electricity. Circular texts written in light repeat the words KickBack and KnockKnockKnock – giving the appearance of an endless loop. Throughout the exhibition, the new works employ silence and stillness to create an uncanny perception of sound and movement and to explore the relationship between seeing and hearing.

Impenetrable Room

In the last room gallery, the viewer enters a labyrinth of four 6 x 6 foot structures that together make up the Impenetrable Room (2016). This new body of work co-opts the materials and format of portable “road cases,” which are customarily used to transport and protect musical instruments. Refitting the cases with mirrors and neon light, Navarro transforms these static objects into deep spaces that appear to recede towards infinity.

Impenetrable Room

In this installation, undulating lines of green neon diagrammatically echo the propagation of sound waves through a medium. Silent and monolithic, these self-contained rooms resonate with unspoken narrative power.

Read You Loud Unclear

Black and white paper squares are scattered across the floors of both galleries. The words Read You and Loud Unclear, printed on opposite sides of the cards, call attention to the disjunction between the visual and auditory aspects of communication. Informed by the aesthetics and rhythms of military parades, the exhibition contemplates the juxtaposed feelings of celebration and intimidation that martial music is intended to create.

Tuning Alternate View

Iván Navarro’s Mute Parade will be on Exhibit Through December 23rd, 2016 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, located at 293 Tenth Avenue (Corner of 27th Street) in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Impenetrable Room

Eye On Design: Fluorescent Cactus Garden By Nobel Truong

Fluorescent Cactus Garden
All Photos By Gail

Laser cut from fluorescent green and fluorescent red acrylic, the Cactus Garden acts a both a day and night lighting fixture. The sculptures offer a subtle glow when in light thanks to the fluorescent material from which they are cut.

Fluorescent Cactus Garden

An LED wired base can also be fitted to each cactus, illumining the sculptures in UV blacklight. All cactus styles are cut to nest the lamp base, making the design entirely interchangeable.

Fluorescent Cactus Garden Detail 2

This installation was designed and fabricated by Nobel Truong in Los Angeles and photographed at the Architectural Digest Design Show in NYC.

Fluorescent Cactus Garden Detail 3

Neon F-Word

Neon F-Word
Photo By Gail

You must click This Link to find out where I took this photo!