Tag Archive | Drawings

David Hockney’s The Yosemite Suite at Pace Gallery

Yosemite Suite
All Photos By Gail

When I was a small child, growing up in southern California, my parents used to take the family on camping vacations to Yosemite National Park. I probably went there four or five times up to the age of 8 or so. While these vacations are many decades in the past for me now, my very vivid memories of the park and its many tall and fragrant redwood trees, crystal clear shallow streams, majestic mountains, tumbling waterfalls, and other uniquely beautiful natural sights and smells stay with me to this day. Yosemite is breathtaking.

Installation View

British artist David Hockney must feel similarly, because he has created a new series of vivid iPad drawings featuring the wild landscape of Yosemite that you can see and enjoy now at Pace Gallery in Chelsea. When I stood in front of these uncomplicated yet profoundly compelling drawings, I felt like I was back in the park again. Everything looked so familiar to me.

Yosemite Suite

You can almost smell the trees.

Red Trees

Pine Tree

Happy Little Trees.

Mountains

From the late 1800s through most of the 1960s, Yosemite used to have a summertime evening ritual in the park called the Firefall, where visitors could gather to watch a ball of fire get tossed off the side of the one of the mountains, Glacier Point: like a waterfall, only with fire. They stopped doing it because of the danger of a forest fire, and because it got too popular and folks were trampling the meadows to try and see it. It was pretty cool to experience in person though. I’ll never forget it.

MountainsIMG_6836

David Hockney’s The Yosemite Suite will be on Exhibit Through June 18th, 2016 at PACE, Located at 537 West 24th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Signage

Save

Ken Price, Drawings at Matthew Marks Gallery

Where Women Rule
Where Women Rule By Ken Price All Photos By Gail)

Matthew Marks Gallery is currently hosting a retrospective of thirty-four Drawings from the estate of  Ken Price,  most on view for the first time. If you are not familiar with the work of the late ceramic artist and printmaker, this exhibit is an excellent introduction.

Untitled (Geometric Cup and Interior)
Untitled (Geometric Cup and Interior)

“I’ve been drawing since I can remember,” Price has said. “I think sculptors learn to draw so that they can see what they’ve been visualizing.” His earliest works on paper explore forms and colors for his abstract sculptures, as seen in the Specimen drawings of the early 1960s. Price also drew impossible objects, like cups with a leaping frog or a cavorting nude for a handle. In his drawings of the late 1960s and early 1970s, the imaginary spaces inhabited by these objects became more fully realized.

Two Sofas
Two Sofas

Price’s drawings provide a counterpoint to his sculptures while imagining a world they might inhabit. Two Sofas (1991), for example, shows an imaginary domestic interior with a view of anonymous downtown high-rises. A semi-fictional Los Angeles appears in several drawings, complete with clogged freeways and palm-studded skylines.

Blue Interior
Blue Interior

Installation View
Installation View

Nature became the dominant force in the drawings from the early 2000s, which feature erupting volcanoes and turbulent seas inspired by Price’s trips to Hawaii. After his 2002 move to Taos, New Mexico, Price focused more on the high-desert scenery of rocky outcroppings, dramatic sunsets, and isolated trailer homes.

Figurine Cup (Study for Silkscreen)
Figurine Cup (Study for Silkscreen)

He also began depicting his sculptural forms in nature, re-imagining them as monumental figures in the primordial landscape. The effect is both comic and mysterious, like his sculptures themselves — embodying, in the words of Lucy Lippard, “a beautiful and rather horrible strangeness that appeals to both the mind and the senses.”

Ken Price passed away in 2012 at the age of 77.

Ken Price, Drawings will be on Exhibit Through June 25th, at Matthew Marks Gallery, Located at 2016 523 West 24th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Signage

Interior
Interior

Photos of The Shrine In Front of David Bowie’s Apartment Building

12 Feet Deep
Flowers, Photos, Artwork and Gifts from Fans and Mourners Stretch Eight Feet Deep in Front of David Bowie’s Former Home in Downtown NYC (All Photos By Gail)

I’m sure I am not alone when I say that I haven’t really felt centered since I heard the news of David Bowie’s death when I woke up at 6:00 AM on Monday morning. No matter how many bittersweet memories of seeing Bowie in concert back-in-the-day, or engaging personal accounts of ways in which David Bowie profoundly impacted countless lives that I read in my FaceBook news feed — and, trust me, the verbal tributes haven’t stopped coming — this news just doesn’t seem like it could be real. It’s almost like I need to ‘see the body,’ so to speak, for it to really sink in. Because I thought David Bowie was going to live forever. Didn’t we all?

I like to think of myself as being respectful of other’s personal space but, despite being  somewhat mortified at the thought of exploiting David Bowie’s death in any way, or getting in his family’s face when they just want their privacy, the more I thought about it, the more I felt compelled to just go to his house; to make my own pilgrimage to visit the memorial shrine that fans have built over the two short days since he passed, which is growing in front of the building where David Bowie lived with his wife Iman and daughter Lexi. I didn’t know exactly where the building was, but I know downtown pretty well and I recognized a fairly distinctive landmark from seeing many  on-the-scene TV reports, so I was able to figure out where to go.

Let's Dance Graffiti
“Let’s Dance” Graffiti Adds a Bit of Levity to an Otherwise Reverent Shrine Site

A light mist was falling as I walked uptown from the subway station, and the air had that still crispness, indicating that it could just start snowing at any minute. I hoped it would not start snowing just yet. And then I saw the crowd.

Shrine Left Front

My photos are not great because I forgot to turn on my flash for some of them, and also I was trying not to step on, or in front of, anyone else who wanted to get pictures of this very beautiful tribute of love for a man whose music touched almost everyone I know. The collection of beautiful, fragrant flowers, personal David Bowie artwork, toys, gifts, and a small collection of Jesus Candles, is surrounded by metal police barricades, but if you have something you want to add to the shrine, the police will let you walk around and lay it where you feel it should rest. Everyone was very, very cool and respectful.

Cover of AM New York

Up front: The cover story from Tuesday’s issue of AM New York, a free morning daily, generally available as you enter or exit the subway.

Eye Drawing

There is so much artwork left by fans, and I can’t even imagine what has already been covered and buried deep under flowers and mementos.

Bowie Shrine Left

I'm Not Dead

Here’s a sentiment we all wish were true.

Teddy in the Flowers

I wonder who left that little Teddy Bear, and if it held any special message meant for David.

Thank you note and flowers

Posters

British Flag

Bowie’s music played unobtrusively as I stood and took in this scene, and I could hear people sniffling, but a reprieve from the wracked sobbing that I imagine we have all been doing a bit of. It was very peaceful. I think David would have really loved to see such an outpouring of adoration from his fans.

Candles

I wish everyone who loved, and now mourns David tonight could see how beautiful this place is, and feel how much love went into creating it. I didn’t want to intrude on his family’s grief, but I almost felt like I had to go so I could represent for those who are not able to be near this energy.

Bowie Shrine Right

God Speed You David Bowie. We will Miss You Forever.

Taku Obata’s Bust a Move at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Taku Obata TakuspeFAD, Takuspe B-Girl Down Jacket
Figures Left to Right: TakuspeFAD Jersey, TakuspeFAD, and Takuspe B-Girl Down Jacket by Taku Obata (All Photos By Gail)

Jonathan LeVine Gallery is currently hosting Bust a Move, a series of new works by Japanese artist Taku Obata, in his debut solo exhibition in the United States. Bust a Move features Obata’s dynamic wooden sculptures, drawings and lithographs of b-boys, or break-dancers, with a distinctly interpreted fashion style. A b-boy himself, the artist has a precise understanding concerning the forms of the human body and how they move, creating works that are bursting with the kinetic energy found in this urban dance form.

Taku Obata Takuspe (ALTERNATE)
Takuspe (ALTERNATE, Foreground), Takuspe B-Girl Runner (Rear)

The life-size (and larger!) sculptures in Bust a Move are captured in freeze stances, poses that complete every breakdance battle, and are adorned in brightly-colored jumpsuits with accessories sampled from the old-school b-boy style. Surreally elongated hats, glasses and gloves create the illusion of movement, in contrast with the stagnant demeanor of Obata’s subjects. The works have a dominating presence and by portraying modern dance through the ancient technique of Japanese wood-carving, the artist effectively merges popular culture with his cultural roots.

Obata fully immerses viewers in the environment of this subculture through his 3-D works, with the goal of enhancing our awareness and physical senses. In his own words, “I am not simply creating a b-boy, but I aim to create an atmosphere, a cool space with a certain strange and interesting tension.”

Taku Obata Installation View

LeVine is also displaying a collection of Obata’s drawings of b-boys in action, wearing bright, neon colored outfits.

Taku Obata Drawing

Taku Obata Drawing

Taku Obata Drawing
Drawing Detail

Taku Obata’s Bust a Move will be on Exhibit Through December 20th, 2014, at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Taku Obata Bust a Move Signage

Andy Warhol, 1950s Drawings at Anton Kern

Female Portrait
All Photos By Gail

Don’t think for one second that I didn’t fully appreciate the fact that Anton Kern Gallery painted its walls Pepto Bismol Pink for its current exhibit of Andy Warhol Drawings. Because I did.

Andy Warhol: 1950s Drawings brings together 150 never before seen works on paper from the late 1940s through 1960. They show Warhol as a skilled draftsman and great experimenter. Using ink and graphite, he investigated the possibilities of the hand-drawn line, and in the course of this developed his characteristic blotted-line technique, which involved tracing projected photographic images onto paper and blotting the inked figures to create variations on a theme. This exhibition reveals a lesser-known side of Warhol and provides unique insight into the foundation of Pop Art.

Love is a Pie
Love is a Pie

If you only know Warhol through his most popular works such as the mass produced, silk screened Celebrity Portraits and Campbell’s Soup Cans, this exhibit will really show you where the artist came from and reveal how truly talented he was. I mean, the guy could draw a face.

Warhol Male Portrait

This one reminds me of John Lennon.

Warhol Drawings Installation View

You can see by the above photo that every wall is covered with drawings, so you could spend well over an hour here just looking at each one and finding your favorites.

Warhol Peacock

I like this Peacock.

Warhol Looks Like Morrissey

This one looks like Morrissey to me.

Warhol Female Figures

This one is so great.

Lady in the Leaves

The group of drawings currently on view was discovered in the flat files at the Andy Warhol Foundation’s warehouse space in 2011-2012, and marks the third exhibition by the American artist at the Anton Kern Gallery. Very highly recommended.

Andy Warhol 1950s Drawings will be on Exhibit Through December 20th, 2014 at Anton Kern gallery, Located at 532 West 20th Street, In the Chelsea Gallery District.

Andy Warhol 1950s Signage

Match Box Art By Mohamed Larbi Rahhali

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art
All Photos By Gail

These tiny collages, drawings and mixed-media works all represented on Match Boxes are part of the series called Omri (My Life) by Moroccan artist Mohamed Larbi Rahhali.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

Omri is included in Here and Elsewhere, the comprehensive group exhibit currently inhabiting The New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

Here and Elsewhere is a major exhibition of contemporary art from and about the Arab world, and brings together more than forty-five artists from over fifteen countries.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

These photos capture just a fraction of the hundreds of Match Boxes in Mohamed Larbi Rahhali‘s piece, and the work is still ongoing.

Watch for more posts featuring art from Here and Elsewhere on The Gig in the upcoming week.

Here and Elsewhere is on Exhibit Through September 28th, 2014, at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, located at 235 Bowery (at Prince street) in Soho, NYC.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

Adam Green And Friends Hot Chicks at The Hole

Adam Green Hot Chicks Signage
All Photos By Gail

Adam Green used to be part of the “Anti-Folk” duo known as Moldy Peaches, a “Band” whose music was just not that good. Just being honest here. But I can’t hate on Adam Green for his responsibility in making Moldy Peaches a thing, because the guy is just too cool and hilarious to not be crazy about. As a visual and performance artist, Green strikes that perfect balance of being serious without taking himself seriously. His current exhibit, Hot Chicks by Adam Green & Friends is lots of fun. Here are some photos from the show, accompanied by my insightful commentary.

Adam Green Hot Chicks Wall

Right off the bat, I have to give Adam credit for making a lot of drawings for the show.

Adam Green Two Hot Chicks
Two Hot Chicks

The first part of Hot Chicks is comprised of Adam’s interpretations of women, or specifically: juvenile, cubist-inspired “figure” drawings with lots of boobs and weenies in them. The weenies make me think there may be some dudes involved also, but I guess that is open to the viewer’s interpretation. Maybe they are not Weenies but just very long thin Boobs: Discuss.

Adam Green Hot Chicks

This one reminds me of Princess Leia.

Adam Green Hot Chicks Sculpture

I love that he changed it up by throwing in this sculpture, while maintaining the cohesive feel of the show as a theme.

Adam Green Hot Chicks

This one I believe shows the strong influence of Picasso or Mondrian in Adam’s distinctive style.

Adam Green Peen

That looks like a Peen to me, but maybe it is a leg or arm. Please excuse the unintended image of the gallery’s fluorescent strip lights as they reflect off the glass. How gritty.

The second part of the show features fun works by some of Adam’s friends. I am a little bit jealous that he has such cool friends that can at least pretend to make art.

Art By Todd James

Here is a Hot Chick from bona fide artist Todd James, whose work is pretty rad. This was probably my favorite piece in the entire show.

Art By Macaulay Culkin

Collage Art By  Macaulay Culkin

Big Bird By Johnny T. Yerington

Big Bird as a sort of Dominatrix, By Johnny T. Yerington (AKA Adam Green)

Art By Har Mar Superstar

Art By Har Mar Superstar

Art By Alia Shawkat

Art By Alia Shawkat from Arrested Development

Worleygig’com gives this exhibit Two Boobs Up.

Hot Chicks By Adam Green And Friends will be on Exhibit through January 31st, 2014 at The Hole, Located at 312 Bowery (at 2nd Street), NYC. Visit The Hole NYC for Gallery Hours and More Information.

Breaking Bad Coffee Cup Art By Cheeming Boey

Breaking Bad Coffee Cup ArtImage Source

Malaysian artist Cheeming Boey draws intricate and detailed artworks on the exterior of various coffee cups using only a black marker. I especially love this set he did of various characters from Breaking Bad. See more of Boey’s fun art at his daily webcomic I Am Boey.

Souther Salazar’s Souvenirs at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

JLG Souther Salazar Souvenirs
All Photos By Gail

I’m a little bit late to the party writing about this very cool exhibit, due to being busy doing other equally cool things. That said, you have until June 15th to make it to the Jonathan LeVine Gallery to see the Souvenirs solo exhibit from Portland-based artist Souther Salazar.

Souvenirs includes a series of new paintings, drawings, sculptures and installations, and it is very fun and totally family friendly. His art reminds me a bit of artist Jim Houser, whose work I also saw at LeVine very recently; in May of this year.

JLG Salazar Painting

Here’s a little bit of backstory on the inspiration for Souvenirs:

Works in Souvenirs were inspired by The Trading Tortoise, Salazar’s recent collaboration with his wife, Monica Choy. In 2012, the pair created an interactive art installation in the form of a tortoise-shaped trading post, which they took on tour, bartering unique objects and stories at locations in over 30 different cities across the country.

JLG Salazar Tent

During their travels, the artists explored America, exchanging tiny treasures and sharing adventures along the way. This unique community-oriented experience, which connected a diverse group of people through a network of trades, is documented on Trading Tortoise Dot Com.

During Trading Tortoise, Salazar explored the connection between personal memories and collected objects, items that serve as tangible reminders of places, people and events. Organizing his memories of the project into imaginary collections, Salazar created artworks to represent his own visual souvenirs, referencing some of the experiences.

JLG Salazar Truck Drawings

Drawings of trucks, gas pumps and power lines take on anthropomorphic qualities while a series of small sculptures constructed from found objects are presented in curio-like shadow boxes—one contains a series of miniature water towers in varying shapes and sizes, and the other features a group of figures representing some of the people Salazar met, the things they traded and their relationships to those objects.

JLG Salazar Cabinet Close Up 2
Tiny Water Towers Made from Found Objects

JLG Salazar Cabinet Close Up

Souvenirs By Souther Salazar will be on Exhibit Only through June 15th, 2013 at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street, 9th Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

JLG Salazar Cabinet 1

Yoshitomo Nara at Pace Gallery

Yoshitomo Nara Girl Face

Pace Gallery is currently hosting its first exhibition of Japanese artist Yoshitomo Nara, who joined the gallery in 2011. The exhibition features new paintings, bronze sculptures and works on paper.

Yoshitomo Nara Girl Head

I liked his paintings more than the large bronze sculptures. Here are couple of my favorites from Friday night’s opening reception.

Yoshitomo Nara Life Is Hard

This one really resonated with me, as I’m sure it does for many people.

Yoshitomo Nara Sleeping Girl

I like this one as well because the girl could be dead or she could be just sleeping. Probably sleeping.

The Yoshitomo Nara Exhibit will run through Jun 29th, 2013 at Pace Gallery, Located at 534 West 25th Street, NYC in the Chelsea Gallery District. Gallery Hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Yoshitomo Nara Girl with Tree Head

Yoshitomo Nara Girl with Tree Head Sculpture

Yoshitomo Nara Exhibit Signage