Tag Archive | Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Zheng Lu’s Water Dripping – Splashing at Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Sculpture by Zheng Lu
Water Dripping – Splashing By Zheng Lu (All Photos By Gail. Click on Any Image to Enlarge)

The gravity-defying sculpture works of Zheng Lu are deeply influenced by his study of traditional Chinese calligraphy, an art form he practiced growing up in a literary family. Zheng Lu uses language as a pictorial element, inscribing the surface of his stainless-steel sculptures with thousands of Chinese characters derived from texts and poems of historical significance.

Sculpture by Zheng Lu Detail

To create his metal sculptures, Zheng Lu begins with a plaster base. He then laser-cuts character into metal, and in a fashion similar to linking chainmail, the pictographs are connected and heated so that they can be shaped to the support. The resulting works are technically astonishing: their fluid, animated forms are charged with the energy (qi) of the universe, belying their steel composite.

Sculpture by Zheng Lu Detail 1

Zheng Lu was born in Chi Feng, Inner Mongolia, China in 1978. He lives and works in Beijing.

Sculpture by Zheng Lu Detail 2

Zheng Lu’s Water Dripping – Splashing is part of the Bright Eye of the Universe Exhibit and will be up Through October 10th, 2015 at Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Located at 547 West 27th Street, Ground Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Zheng Lu Signage

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Kim Joon’s Somebody at Sundaram Tagore

Somebody-3
Kim Joon, Somebody-3 (All Photos By Gail)

Whenever Korean artist Kim Joon has an exhibit at Sundaram Tagore, you know it’s going to be a good show and his latest, Somebody (which opened on June 12th) is no exception. Somebody presents a series of digital prints that are visually stunning (as is all his work) and full of humor and hidden meaning.

Somebody-4
Somebody-4 (Near Right)

Kim, who is based in Seoul, explores themes of desire, memory, fragility and obsession using digitally rendered tattoos, porcelain, animal skins and human body parts. A master of the computer software 3D Studio Max, Kim successfully juxtaposes traditional Asian motifs, Western Pop references and luxury brand logos.

Somebody-6
Somebody-6

In his new series Somebody, Kim examines the universal desire to transcend the limitations and imperfections of the body. He revisits familiar visual themes, including tattoos, exotic skins and Pop culture imagery, using the body as canvas to introduce bold pattern and vivid color.

Ebony-Tiger
Ebony-Tiger

Somebody-5
Somebody-5

He deconstructs the human form like never before, creating frenetic compositions of fragmented body parts so abstract they require close examination to identify.

Painted Nudes

Digital Print from Kim's 2010 Series, Fragile
Chunhyang on the Limoges, Digital Print from Kim’s 2010 Series, Fragile

Also on exhibit are selected work from Joon’s four previous exhibits at Sundaram Tagore including Bird Land (2009), Fragile (2010), Blue Jean Blues (2012) and Islands (2013).

You can see the exhibit online at This Link, but it really is worth checking out in person.

Kim Joon’s Somebody will be on Exhibit Through July 12th, 2014 at at Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Located at 547 West 27th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District. Gallery Hours are Tuesday – Saturday 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM.

Kim Joon Somebody Signage
Sundaram Tagore Gallery Signage

New Works By Kim Joon Featured in Sundaram Tagore’s Natural Selection

Kim Joon Island Alligator
Kim Joon, Island Alligator (All Photos By Gail)

Korean artist Kim Joon has shifted his artistic direction dramatically since last year’s exhibit at Sundaram Tagore, Blue Jean Blues, in which he explored Pop Culture themes of Iconic Films and Classic Rock Bands in sculptures executed on fine porcelain, and pristine photographic renderings of those sculptures.

Kim Joon Island Aligator Detail
Island Aligator Detail

In his latest series, Island, Joon uses the computer software 3D Studio Max to create gorgeous digital prints that explore the volatile relationship between humanity and nature. This dramatic shift in focus of subject matter was spurred by two recent events in Joon’s life: witnessing the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, which happened close to his home, and a visit to the volcanic island of Jeju, considered one of the most beautiful and mystical islands in Korea.

Kim Joon Island Snake
Island Snake

Kim Joon Island Snake
Island Snake Detail

For this artist, the juxtaposition of these two experiences provoked an examination of the relationship between nature and humanity and the paradox of the fragility and strength of life. Joon’s stunningly rendered images depict a series of islands seemingly created from fragmented human bodies mapped by exotic animal skins, poised to unfurl as they rise from the ocean. According to Joon, the bodies raise the question of whether damaged lives can be repaired if humanity tries to create harmony with nature.

Kim Joon Island Shell
Island Shell

Kim Joon Island Shell Detail
Island Shell Detail

Natural Selection is an exhibition that brings together the work of four radically different artists who share a deep-rooted connection to the natural world. Other artists whose work is represented in this exhibit include Tom Doyle, Hiroshi Senju and Ricardo Mazal.

Natural Selection Featuring New Works By Kim Joon will be on Exhibit Through December 21st, 2013, at Sundaram Tagore Gallery,Located at 547 West 27th Street (street level) in the Chelsea Gallery District, NY.

Natural Selection Signage

Kim Joon Island Mackeral
Island Mackeral and Detail Below

Kim Joon Island Mackeral Detail

Kim Joon’s Blue Jean Blues at Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Sundaram Tagore Gallery Front View

Here’s another exhibit that we checked out on a whim during last Thursday’s very rewarding art crawl, only to have it end up as one of the highlights of the evening: Blue Jean Blues by Korean contemporary artist Kim Joon. For his newest series of digital prints, Kim uses porcelain as his digital medium, putting him at the forefront of the new-media movement.

Playboy
Playboy By Kim Joon

In Blue Jean Blues Kim, who is based in Seoul, Korea, explores themes of desire, memory and youth. Using porcelain, Kim fabricates compositions out of tableware, fragments of idealized nudes and icons of Western pop culture; including musical instruments, cars and guns. Showcasing his fine skill with the computer software 3D Studio Max, Kim coats the white backgrounds and surfaces of objects with pop-culture imagery. He successfully juxtaposes old and new, traditional Asian motifs and new media.

Rebel Without a Cause
Rebel Without a Cause

Reality and fantasy collide as tiny sculptures of blue jeans take on a life of their own and inhabit their virtual surroundings – perching on an oversized guitar in Blue Jean Blues – Jimi Hendrix and a classic car in Blue Jean Blues – Rebel without a Causealluding to society’s desire for material objects as well as nostalgic obsessions and attachments. The cultural symbolism associated with jeans is also the artist’s lament for the fading memory of his social resistance – expressed in earlier work through a fascination with tattoos.


Rocky Horror Picture Show Plate

Rocky Horror Picture Show Lips
Rocky Horror Picture Show  Bowl

My favorite part of this exhibit is a series that the artist calls “Rockers” — each of which features a cast porcelain wrist and hand (sometimes backed by a plate or bowl)  in the act of “throwing metal.”  Each hand is decorated with a band’s name along with member likenesses or song titles made famous by that specific band. Unbelievably cool! Any one of the Rockers series would be a fabulous addition to a collection of contemporary works.

Rockers: Kiss By Kim Joon
Rockers: Kiss

Rockers: Sex Pistols By Kim Joon
Rockers: Sex Pistols

Rockers: Pink Floyd and Jefferson Airplane
Rockers: Pink Floyd and Jefferson Airplane (Click on any Image to Enlarge for Detail)

Kim Joon’s Blue Jean Blues will be on Exhibit Through October 6th, 2012 at Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Located at 547 West 27th Street, Street Level, New York City. Gallery Hours are Tuesday – Saturday 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM.