Tag Archives: Alligator

Street Art By Ian Knife

ian knife tag photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail Worley

The first time I saw the name “Ian Knife” it was gouged into the top of a tree stump on Avenue A that had been carefully carved and painted to resemble the head of an Alligator. Impressive.

alligator by ian knife photo but gail worleyalligator by ian knife photo by gail worley
alligator by ian knife photo by gail

I’m not sure how long the Alligator Stump has been there, but I swear I only noticed it for the first time this past summer, when I was doing more than my fair share of walking in the neighborhood because everything was closed due to the Covid (#CovidLife). I didn’t realize at the time that Ian Knife was the name of the artist; I just assumed it was a dick move by some inconsiderate ass taking delight in tagging the Alligator’s face by carving his name into it. Because that is what people do.

ian knife name tag 3 photo by gail worley
Say His Name

ian knife tag on box truck photo by gail worley

Some time later, I started seeing the tag Knife spray-painted literally fucking everywhere from the East River Park throughout the East Village. Curious, I looked-up Ian Knife on the Google and I found this pretty cool article about his work as a Tree Stump Artist. I’m glad he is getting his name out there because his work is unique and fun.

ian knife tree stump art photo by gail worley

Knife’s tree stump carvings, a few of which are described in the above article, are scattered all over the East Village, where he lives. This one of a ‘Man Behind Bars‘ is on First Avenue between St. Mark’s Place and Ninth Street.

ian knife tree stump art photo by gail worley

If I spot more of Ian’s tree stump carvings I’ll add them to this post! In the meantime, keep your eyes peeled!

ian knife tag photo by gail wortley

ian knife outdoor dining photo by gail worley

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Elephant Statue on Flatbed Truck

Pink Elephant
Photo By Gail

While I’m not crazy about the fact that this post is basically an advertisement for whatever store is now located at the above Madison Avenue address, I could not resist snapping a photo of this awesome Pink Elephant Statue as I passed the shops along Antique Row on South Broadway late one Saturday evening. If you look closely, you’ll also see what looks like a stone or cement Alligator sculpture, which would be fun to own. It just goes to show you that you should always have your camera at the ready when you go out for a stroll in NYC.

Update: I saw this same statue — or one identical to it —  on September 11th, 2016 in front of this antiques store on Bowery just above Houston.

Pink Elephant

New Works By Kim Joon Featured in Sundaram Tagore’s Natural Selection

Kim Joon Island Alligator
Kim Joon, Island Alligator (All Photos By Gail)

Korean artist Kim Joon has shifted his artistic direction dramatically since last year’s exhibit at Sundaram Tagore, Blue Jean Blues, in which he explored Pop Culture themes of Iconic Films and Classic Rock Bands in sculptures executed on fine porcelain, and pristine photographic renderings of those sculptures.

Kim Joon Island Aligator Detail
Island Aligator Detail

In his latest series, Island, Joon uses the computer software 3D Studio Max to create gorgeous digital prints that explore the volatile relationship between humanity and nature. This dramatic shift in focus of subject matter was spurred by two recent events in Joon’s life: witnessing the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, which happened close to his home, and a visit to the volcanic island of Jeju, considered one of the most beautiful and mystical islands in Korea.

Kim Joon Island Snake
Island Snake

Kim Joon Island Snake
Island Snake Detail

For this artist, the juxtaposition of these two experiences provoked an examination of the relationship between nature and humanity and the paradox of the fragility and strength of life. Joon’s stunningly rendered images depict a series of islands seemingly created from fragmented human bodies mapped by exotic animal skins, poised to unfurl as they rise from the ocean. According to Joon, the bodies raise the question of whether damaged lives can be repaired if humanity tries to create harmony with nature.

Kim Joon Island Shell
Island Shell

Kim Joon Island Shell Detail
Island Shell Detail

Natural Selection is an exhibition that brings together the work of four radically different artists who share a deep-rooted connection to the natural world. Other artists whose work is represented in this exhibit include Tom Doyle, Hiroshi Senju and Ricardo Mazal.

Natural Selection Featuring New Works By Kim Joon will be on Exhibit Through December 21st, 2013, at Sundaram Tagore Gallery,Located at 547 West 27th Street (street level) in the Chelsea Gallery District, NY.

Natural Selection Signage

Kim Joon Island Mackeral
Island Mackeral and Detail Below

Kim Joon Island Mackeral Detail