Tag Archive | Porcelain

Modern Art Monday Presents: Jeff Koons, Michael Jackson and Bubbles

Michael Jackson and Bubbles
Photos By Gail

In imagining Michael Jackson (19582009) as a contemporary god of pop culture, Jeff Koons draws on long histories of representing mythic figures in sculpture. In Michael Jackson and and Bubbles (1988), the singer cradles his pet chimpanzee, mimicking a Pieta as perhaps a poignant evolutionary take on the composition of a mother and her child. Koons uses the techniques and conventions of traditional Meissen porcelain — a medium often associated with kitsch — on a grand scale, to underscore the mass appeal of his subject. Similarly, the pronounced use of gold signals excess to the point of banality, even as it reflects the brilliance of the megastar in the manner of an Egyptian pharaoh.

Michael Jackson and Bubbles

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Like Life: Sculpture, Color and The Body, at The Met Breuer, NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Melitta Heritage Series Coffeemaker

Pink Melitta Pour Over Coffee Maker
All Photos By Gail

Oh, how I love a modern product whose design riffs on a retro look! I spotted this adorable (and practical!) Melitta Heritage Series Pour-Over Coffeemaker at the recent IHA Show, and was instantly smitten: not only with its millennial Pink color, but also by the vintage glazed porcelain design! Wow!

Pink Melitta Pour Over Coffee Maker

It makes perfect sense that this design is from the brand’s new Heritage Collection. While Melitta is a well-known brand that many of us have grown up with, I didn’t know anything about the company’s engaging backstory! In 1908, German housewife Melitta Bentz invented the world’s first pour-over coffeemaker when she poked holes in the bottom of a brass cup and lined it with a sheet of her son’s blotting paper (the first coffee filter)! The pour-over method that we take for granted, which results in rich, flavorful handcrafted coffee, came to be because a smart lady came up with an on-the-fly solution to effortlessly make coffee more delicious!

Pink Melitta Pour Over Coffee Maker

Melitta’s Heritage Series Pour-Over Coffeemaker Set includes a porcelain Pour-Over cone and matching 20 once carafe. The design debuted at IHA 2018 and is available in stores now.

Chris Antemann’s Forbidden Fruit at The Museum of Arts and Design

Forbidden Fruit
All Photos By Gail

If the idea of bearing witness to dozens of tiny, semi-clad porcelain figurines that appear to be on the cusp of indulging in a bacchanalian orgy floats your boat, have I a got an art exhibit for you. Chris Antemann’s Forbidden Fruit — up now at the Museum of Arts and Design — celebrates the collaboration between the Oregon-based artist and Meissen, the renowned manufacturer of fine Porcelain.

Forbidden Fruit Detail
Detail from Above Photo

In 2011, Antemann was invited to participate in Meissen’s Art Studio Program, where she worked closely with Meissen’s master artisans to create unique pieces and a series of limited editions that strike a perfect balance between her distinctive style and Meissen’s identity. These pieces are arranged in Forbidden Fruit as a grand installation that reinvents and invigorates the great figurative tradition.

Forbidden Fruit Installation View

Inspired by eighteenth-century porcelain figurines and decorative art, Antemann’s delicate and intricately detailed sculptures are lavishly presented on a central banquet table alongside a selection of stand alone sculptures and a nine-light porcelain chandelier. Her centerpiece, Love Temple (2013), is inspired by Meissen’s great historical model of Johann Joachim Kändler’s monumental Love Temple (1750). Stripping the original design back to its basic forms,  added her own figures, ornamentation, and flowers to her five-foot work, as well as a special finial with three musicians to herald the arrival of guests to the banquet of “forbidden fruit” below.

Love Temple Detail

Forbidden Fruit

Forbidden Fruit

Using the Garden of Eden as her metaphor, Antemann has created a contemporary interpretation of the eighteenth-century banqueting craze by inserting her scantily clad male and female figures.

Forbidden Fruit

Forbidden Fruit

Posed in intimate and playful vignettes of seduction, Antemann’s figures convey narratives of domesticity, social etiquette, and taboos while making formal references to classic Baroque Meissen figurines. The ceramist invents a new narrative on contemporary morality in a setting that evokes the decadence of François Boucher and Jean-Antoine Watteau.

Forbidden Fruit

Chris Antemann’s Forbidden Fruit will be on Exhibit Through February 5, 2017 at the Museum of Arts and Design, Located at 2 Columbus circle (58th Street) in NYC.

Forbidden Fruit

Forbidden Fruit

Forbidden Fruit Installation View

Porca Miseria! Chandelier at MOMA

Porca Miseria! Chandelier Distance
All Photos By Gail

The Porca Miseria! Chandelier is a revolt against the “slickness” of contemporary design and designer  Ingo Maurer’s celebration of slow–motion cinematic explosions. Only 10 of these lamps are produced annually, as four builders and must work on each one for almost 5 days, carefully breaking plates with a hammer or dropping them on the floor to determine the arrangement of the final design. The title, a common Italian interjection similar to “damn,” expressing irritation, surprise, annoyance, or incredulity, evokes both the frustration of breaking a dish and the release that comes from breaking many of them.

Porca Miseria! Chandelier

Porca Miseria! Chandelier

Porca Miseria! was Photographed while on exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art, in the Design Gallery.

New Works By Kim Joon Featured in Sundaram Tagore’s Natural Selection

Kim Joon Island Alligator
Kim Joon, Island Alligator (All Photos By Gail)

Korean artist Kim Joon has shifted his artistic direction dramatically since last year’s exhibit at Sundaram Tagore, Blue Jean Blues, in which he explored Pop Culture themes of Iconic Films and Classic Rock Bands in sculptures executed on fine porcelain, and pristine photographic renderings of those sculptures.

Kim Joon Island Aligator Detail
Island Aligator Detail

In his latest series, Island, Joon uses the computer software 3D Studio Max to create gorgeous digital prints that explore the volatile relationship between humanity and nature. This dramatic shift in focus of subject matter was spurred by two recent events in Joon’s life: witnessing the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, which happened close to his home, and a visit to the volcanic island of Jeju, considered one of the most beautiful and mystical islands in Korea.

Kim Joon Island Snake
Island Snake

Kim Joon Island Snake
Island Snake Detail

For this artist, the juxtaposition of these two experiences provoked an examination of the relationship between nature and humanity and the paradox of the fragility and strength of life. Joon’s stunningly rendered images depict a series of islands seemingly created from fragmented human bodies mapped by exotic animal skins, poised to unfurl as they rise from the ocean. According to Joon, the bodies raise the question of whether damaged lives can be repaired if humanity tries to create harmony with nature.

Kim Joon Island Shell
Island Shell

Kim Joon Island Shell Detail
Island Shell Detail

Natural Selection is an exhibition that brings together the work of four radically different artists who share a deep-rooted connection to the natural world. Other artists whose work is represented in this exhibit include Tom Doyle, Hiroshi Senju and Ricardo Mazal.

Natural Selection Featuring New Works By Kim Joon will be on Exhibit Through December 21st, 2013, at Sundaram Tagore Gallery,Located at 547 West 27th Street (street level) in the Chelsea Gallery District, NY.

Natural Selection Signage

Kim Joon Island Mackeral
Island Mackeral and Detail Below

Kim Joon Island Mackeral Detail

Jeff Koons Banalty Series Comes to Fine Dinnerware!

Koons Bubbles Michael Set
All Photos By Gail

To celebrate their 150th Anniversary, Bernardaud, makers of fine porcelain and other luxury decorative items for the home, has created a collection of tableware designed by filmmakers, photographers and artists including Jean-Michel Alberola, Marco Brambilla, Sophie Calle, Fassianos, Jeff Koons, Michael Lin, David Lynch, Marlene Mocquet, Nabil Nahas, Prune Norry, JR, Sarkis and Julian Schnabel.

Koons Banality Bear Plates

During Saturday’s art crawl, we stumbled upon a boutique that’s opened up in Chelsea, located at 465 West 23rd Street, just east of 10th Avenue, where this design-ware will be on display throughout the summer of 2013. Before we were politely told that no photographs were allowed (of course), we managed to snap a few shots of Jeff Koons Banality Series, based on a selection of his most popular projects.

Koons Banality Series Sign

The Bernardaud Pop Up Store is more of a showroom than a regular retail outlet but we’re guessing you can place orders for the dinnerware at the shop (the lady working there seemed very nice) and have it delivered to your home at a later date. It goes without saying that it likely costs a fortune, but what else is money for, if not to surround yourself with nice things? For more information, and to see designs by the other artists, visit Bernardaud 150.
Bernardaud Signage
West 23rd Street Storefront

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Devils Salt & Pepper Shakers By Jonathan Adler

Devils Salt & Pepper Shaker Set

This wicked set of porcelain salt and pepper shakers in the likeness of Satan himself is available from designer Jonathan Adler‘s online shop for just $48 by clicking on This Link.