Tag Archive | Couture

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Fashions From Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons Art of The In-Between at The Met!

Installation View
All Photos By Gail

Every year , the Metropolitan Museum of Art hosts a fashion exhibit full of mind-blowing, ‘wearable’ works of art. We enjoy making multiple visits during each exhibit’s tenure, which generally lasts into late summer, and taking way too many photos than we will never do anything with. Because too may photos is a thing. and it is how we roll.

Pink Dress with Brace

For spring/summer 2017,  the Costume Institute’s exhibition examines the work of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, founder of Comme des Garçons (French for “Like Boys”), who is known for her avant-garde designs and ability to challenge conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and fashionability. The thematic show features approximately 140 examples of Kawakubo’s womenswear for Comme des Garçons dating from the early 1980s to her most recent collection, many with heads and wigs created and styled by Julien d’Ys. 90% of the designs are just out of control, crazy couture that no one would ever wear anywhere but the runway, or one time only to a gala where you need to be remembered for wearing a dress that comes with its own cage, or something.

2 Pink Dresses

The galleries illustrate the designer’s revolutionary experiments in “in-betweenness”—the space between boundaries. Objects are organized into nine aesthetic expressions of interstitiality in Kawakubo’s work: Absence/Presence, Design/Not Design, Fashion/Anti-Fashion, Model/Multiple, Then/Now, High/Low, Self/Other, Object/Subject, and Clothes/Not Clothes. Kawakubo breaks down the imaginary walls between these dualisms, exposing their artificiality and arbitrariness.

Pink and Blue Dress

If you are intrigued by the Pink Presses in this post, which is how I was able to distill the exhibit for this blog, then you need to check this shit out in person, because it is just insane.

Flowered Dress

18th Century Punk Installation View

18th Century Punk
18th Century Punk,  Autumn/Winter 2016 – 2017

Look: Proof that this ‘dress’ fits on a human body!

18th Century Punk

Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons Art of The In-Between Runs Through September 4th, 2017 at The Met, NYC.

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Eye On Design: YSL Color Block Couture Dress Circa 1965

YSL Couture Color Block Dress
Photos By Gail

Yves Saint Laurent’s fall 1965 collection was inspired by the paintings of Piet Mondrian. While it became one of Saint Laurent’s most famous collections, other designers had introduced similar designs before him. The Montreal Gazette claimed that color-blocked dresses by Michele Roiser had inspired Saint Laurent to “add a few black lines” to his own creations. View some of the collections here: https://teranicouture.com/collection/evening-dresses-2016-and-2017

Installation View

YSL dress seen here with a color block design by Lousi Feraud (circa 1967) on the left.

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Top Ten Favorite Photos from the Manus x Machina Fashion Exhibit at The Met

Manus Machina Signage
All Photos By Gail

There’s only one drawback when The Met allows photography at one of their fashion exhibits, and that is that I have way too many great photos to choose from, and simply cannot distill the show down to a single blog post. So, it’s extremely fortunate — for me, for you —  that Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology, which has been up since May, was extended to September 5th, 2016, or I’d once again be scrambling to throw something together a day before the show ends.

Just to get you up to speed, the Costume Institute’s spring 2016 exhibition explores how fashion designers are reconciling the handmade and the machine-made in the creation of haute couture and avant-garde ready-to-wear. With more than 170 ensembles dating from the early 20th century to the present, the exhibition addresses the founding of the haute couture in the 19th century, when the sewing machine was invented, and the emergence of a distinction between the hand (manus) and the machine (machina) at the onset of mass production. Manus x Machina explores this ongoing dichotomy, in which hand and machine are presented as discordant tools in the creative process, and questions the relationship and distinction between haute couture and ready-to-wear.

I managed to cull ten favorite images — plus one bonus image — for this post. Enjoy!

Shimmering Dresses
Various Designs in Sequined and Metallic Finishes

Alexander McQueen
(Left) Boué Soeurs, Court Presentation Ensemble, 1928. (Right) Designs by Alexander McQueen

Hussein Chalayan Floating DressHussein Chalayan Floating Dress
Hussein Chalayan, Floating Dress

Alexander McQueen
Feathered Cape and Dress By Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen and Iris Van Herpin
Designs by Alexander McQueen and Iris van Herpen

House of Dior
Pleated Skirts by House of Dior

Miyake Design Studio
Miyake Design Studio

Mariano Fortuny
Designs by Mariano Fortuny

Madame Gres and Iris Van Herpin
Designs by Madame Gres (Alix Barton, Rear) and Iris van Herpen (Front)

Commes De Garcons
Designs by Commes De Garçons

And here’s your bonus image:
Three Dresses

Don’t you want to go right now? Better hurry, you’ve got about three more weeks!

Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology, will be on Exhibit at The Met Fifth Avenue in Galleries 955, 961–962 and 964–965 Through September 5th, 2016!

Pink Thing of The Day: Couture Skirt and Top By Giambattista Valli

Couture Skirt and Top By Giambattista Valli
All Photos By Gail

Giambattista Valli (Italian, b. 1966) embodies contemporary couture. His collections blend fantasy with simple, clean lines in garments that are inherently wearable and intensely romantic. Each piece is meticulously crafted, with decadent fabrics and impeccable tailoring. Voluminous, indulgent and chromatically rich, his gowns, such as the feathery tulle ball-gown skirt with piped pajama top (2014) are both extravagant and modern.

Couture Skirt and Top By Giambattista Valli
Installation View

Couture Skirt Fabric Detail
Couture Skirt Fabric Detail

Photographed as part of the Beauty: Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial Exhibit at the Cooper Hewitt Museum in Upper Manhattan