Tag Archive | Designer

Eye On Design: Cabinet De Curiosité By Shiro Kuramata

Cabinet De Curiosite 2
All Photos By Gail

Shiro Kuramata (1934 – 1991) a member of The Memphis Group and among the most innovative designers of the late twentieth century, was fascinated by the visual possibilities of acrylic. The artist stated that his ideal objective was to see objects floating in air. Named for the Wunderkammern owned by Renaissance princes that displayed natural and man-made curiosities, Cabinet De Curiosité (1988) offers the magical impression of suspending its contents in midair. Kuramata explored the phenomenological effects of acrylic — light and lightness, invisibility and reflectivity, weight and weightlessness – and the material has become the poetic signature of his work. Kuramata used the term Neiro, or “sound-color,” to describe the synesthetic effect that acrylic has it both its physical presence and the spectral color-shadows it casts as light passes through it. Its prismatic luminosity changes with light and viewpoint, exploiting the optical effects of the material. Shown here alongside Flower Vase #3 (1989).

Photographed in the Met Breuer in NYC.

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Eye On Design Presents: Paco Rabanne Gold Metal Handbag Circa 1966

Paco Rabanne Gold Metal Handbag
Photo By Gail

Paco Rabanne was first known as an accessories designer and his work was regularly featured in the pages of magazines such as Elle and Harper’s Bazaar. This bag was likely made after the designer has started his clothing line. It shows how his idea of “futuristic armor” was translated into an eye-catching accessory

Photographed in the Museum at FIT

Eye On Design: Piet Hein Eek’s Past and Future Found Glass Chandeliers!

Eek Chandeliers
All Photos By Gail

We saw these gorgeous light fixtures at ICFF and just fell in love with their Rococo look! Not only are they beautiful to look at, but the story behind them is also fantastic! Dutch designer Piet Hein Eek’s work embodies the concepts of transformation and reinvention. Spanning furniture design, architecture and fine art, Eek elevates discarded, quotidian and unorthodox materials into pieces that make a strong case for the Design-as-Art conversation. This is likely why Eek was presented by Paris-based glass lighting manufacturer Veronese with a dream job: to give a second life to their found glass pieces.

Eek Chandelier

The project began when Veronese’s creative director Ruben Jochimek came across a forgotten stockpile of spare glass pieces — all hand blown by skilled Italian artisans of Murano — in the basement of their Parisian showroom. Comprised of over one-thousand pieces, the collection had been building up since 1931. These ornate glass pieces — stored on dusty shelves for nearly a century — included crafted cups, drops, rings and flowers.

Past and Future Collection Signage

Piet Hein Eek took  Veronese’s found glass objects and came up with the Past and Future collection of chandeliers! An eclectic feast of styles and colors, the resulting product blends glass parts from different collections, giving a second life to Veronese’s long-forgotten glass pieces. Upcycling at its finest!

Eek Table Lamp

The lamps are made of 40cm glass tubes, equipped with LED lighting into which the spare parts can be slotted.  Each model is 40cm high and 25/30cm in diameter, creating a suspension composed of three modules. The tubes can also be assembled to create longer chandeliers. Visit Veronese online at This Link!

Eek Chandelier
Photographed at the ICFF 2017 at the Javits Center, NYC

Eye On Design: Oshibana Flower Chair by Annie Evelyn

Oshibana Chair
All Photos By Gail

Annie Evelyn is a furniture maker who creates alternatively upholstered chairs. Joy, laughter and the unexpected are at the heart of her work. Using furniture’s inherent interactive qualities and relationships to the human body, Evelyn sets out to invent new tactile experiences.

Annie Evelyn Booth

Oshibana Chair Detail
Oshibana Chair, Upholstery Detail

The Oshibana chair is covered with handmade paper flowers and silk flowers on a wood and foam base. See more of Evelyn’s work at her Website.

Oshibana Chair 1

Photographed in The Furniture Society Booth at ICFF 2017, Javits Center NYC

Photos From Paris Refashioned: 1957-1968 at The Museum at FIT

Installation View with Ungaro Coat
All Photos By Gail

For reasons that take too long to talk about, I’m late to the game with my post on the exhibit Paris Refashioned: 1957-1968, which closed on April 15th, 2017. But why waste a collection of lovely photos when I could still post them here, in hope that they will entice you to attend the museum’s next exhibit, while you learn more about the history of French fashion!

Installation View
Installation View

I was fortunate to visit the exhibit one frigid Saturday afternoon in February, when there were very few other attendees and the feelings of nostalgia were great, as it reminded me of shopping with my mother when I was a little girl back in the 1960s.

Installation View with Pantsuits
Installation View with Pantsuits

Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968 highlighted one of the most groundbreaking time periods in fashion history. While many books and exhibitions about this era position London as the center of innovative, youth-oriented design, this limited perspective overlooks the significant role that Paris continued to play in the fashion industry. Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968 examined the combined influence of French haute couture, ready-to-wear, and popular culture during this era, with particular emphasis on how fashion was perceived and promoted by the American fashion press. All objects on view were selected from The Museum at FIT’s permanent collection of more than 50,000 objects.

Please enjoy some of our favorite designs from the show!

Evening Suit By Coco Chanel
Evening Suit By Coco Chanel in Gold Silk Satin Brocade, 1960

Christian Dior Hostess Gown
Christian Dior Ready-to-Wear Hostess Gown, Printed Ivory Silk Satin, 1957

Installation View with Red Suit

Emanuel Ungaro Couture Dress
Emanuel Ungaro Couture Dress, Red Double-knit Wool, Polyurethane and PVC, 1967

Emanuel Ungaro Couture Coat
Left Foreground: Emanuel Ungaro Couture Coat. Blue and Grey Printed Wool Fabric By Sonia Knapp, 1968

Jules Lanvin Couture Evening Ensemble
Far Left: Jeanne Lanvin (aka Jules-Francois Crahay)  Couture Evening Ensemble Dress and Hood in Fuschia Silk Chifon and Rhinestones, 1964-65

Pierre Cardin Coat and Pinafore Dress
Left: Pierre Cardin Ready-to-Wear Coat and Pinafore Dress and Belt in Burgundy Leather, 1967

Arlette Nastat Ready-to-Wear Dress

Arlette Nastat Ready-to-Wear Dress Detail
Arlette Nastat Ready-to-Wear Dress in Black and Pink Linen, 1966

Exhibit Signage

Look for more individual pieces from the exhibit to be featured in Wednesday’s weekly Eye On Design column in upcoming weeks!

Andres Courreges Couture Dress 1968
André Courrèges Couture Dress in Black Chiffon, Tan Silk and Black Vinyl, 1968

Eye On Design: Mattia Bonetti’s Liquid Gold Cabinet

Liquid Gold CabinetLiquid Gold Cabinet
All Photos By Gail

The Swiss-born designer Matia Bonetti is known for his irreverent, eye-grabbing, and (often) dazzlingly shiny functional objects. Bonetti enjoys playing with both organic and geometric forms rather than adhering to a consistent style. Created from Gold-plated bronze, cast aluminum, and rock crystal, the Liquid Gold Cabinet combines the two aesthetics, the designer offers, “because it’s quite straight in line, but you have all these ripplings that are more informal. They could be called Baroque, with their guiding and the richness.”

Photographed in the Paul Kasmin Gallery, NYC as part of the Indoor Outdoor Exhibit in 2013.

Liquid Gold Cabinet
Liquid Gold Cabinet Shown Here with the Arctic Raft Side Table to the Left

Eye On Design: Mattia Bonetti, Lucky Side Table or Stool

Lucky Side Table or Stool
(“Get Lucky” (All Photos By Gail)

Swiss designer Mattia Bonetti scores again with Lucky (2013), a stainless steel Di (get a second to make proper pair of dice) which measures 18.62″ H x 18.6″ W x 18.62″ D and can be used as a stool or side table. Available in an edition of 100.

Lucky Side Table or Stool

Photographed in the Paul Kasmin Gallery in NYC.